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Interval training using a HRM...

daveclowdaveclow Posts: 164
interval training with a HRM is something i do for my rowing. its widely thought of as the best tactic for bettering your times.
for example, ill do 4 mins easy pace, then 1 minute flat out at 190bpm. then build up the reps over time. its really helped me.

do people do the same on the bike? i guess the main deffernces between cycling and rowing is that when im racing in a boat it only lasts 6-7 minutes or so. however, the stamina required to ride hard on a bike for a long is quite different. would interval training work?

Posts

  • BronzieBronzie Posts: 4,927
    Training with/by heart rate is still pretty widespread, although training with power meters is gaining ground pretty quickly. Certainly for shorter intervals, power measurement is preferrable due to the lag in response inherent in heart rate.

    As long as you know the limitations of training with an HRM, I think you can progress a fair way without resort to the more expensive power measurement.
  • KléberKléber Posts: 6,842
    daveclow: what are you training for. If it's road racing then you can do a variety of intervals to mimic different situations like closing a gap, sprinting etc. If it's for time trials then think about longer intervals, for example two minutes at a time up to so-called 2x20 training.
  • LJARLJAR Posts: 128
    Training with an HRM is a bit of an odd thing in rowing, since using a ergo is essentially using a power meter, so heart rate is always a bit secondary to 500m split time.

    I also come from a background in rowing and the only analogy to it in cycling is a TT really. Road racing, as has already been mentioned, is a much less consistent effort and so intervals are really important.

    Training with HR will do fine for the moment, and if you get into cycling more than a PM may be a good investment.
  • Personally I find interval training boring and difficult done alone.
    I prefer to do it on a track training session or chasing others or trying to stay away from them during training rides.
    I tried a power meter and did not like it one bit.
    Kept looking at it and the display was intermittent, especially on climbs. Ok for downloading data later but not much use to me riding as I would have liked a stable display so I could adjust my effort for correct power putput.
  • Im a big fan of HR based interval training - for me it helps with getting to the peak, staying at a constant level for whatever time, and then making sure there's a big enough drop to make it an interval. All stuff I found it hard to do when working from "perceived effort" (I cant tell the difference between knackered, totally knackered and actually a bit too knackered to be any use)
  • as the others have said yes, it is essentially the same. maybe not as accurate as power meters but HRMs can be a great help in structuring and measuring your training.
  • chill123 wrote:
    as the others have said yes, it is essentially the same. maybe not as accurate as power meters but HRMs can be a great help in structuring and measuring your training.
    HRMs are not inaccurate, they do a good job of accurately measuring your heart rate. They don't however measure your power output, which is what matters.

    HRMs are handy to provide an indication of the intensity at which you are riding (which is the most important element in training), in particular when travelling at aerobic power/effort levels - but are not much use for shorter efforts, e.g. hard efforts of 4-5 min or less. So for general training and fitness development, used well they can be a good aid. Just be aware of their limitations (e.g. cardiac drift, delayed response time, other factors that can influence HR and their lack of efficacy for short hard efforts).

    Where they fall down is in providing an indication of changes in fitness, which of course they cannot do.
  • for example two minutes at a time up to so-called 2x20 training.

    I always thought 2 x20 was two lots of twenty minutes! Am i wrong?
  • BronzieBronzie Posts: 4,927
    beatsystem wrote:
    for example two minutes at a time up to so-called 2x20 training.

    I always thought 2 x20 was two lots of twenty minutes! Am i wrong?
    No, that is correct. Two 20-minute efforts with a 5-minute or so recovery in between.

    My reading of Kleber's post is that intervals can vary from 2 mins up to around 20 minutes depending on what level you are trying to train at. Obviously 2 minute intervals can be at a much higher intensity than 20 minute intervals and you would do more repetitions (ie 8x2-mins).
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