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Aching wrists

sian_csian_c Posts: 101
edited September 2009 in Commuting chat
I'm writing this on behalf of my boyfriend who has recently started cycling to work (about 6 miles each way). It's his first real use of a road bike (got a Trek Portland) and has been complaining of wrist problems. Not only have his wrists been aching on the bike (sometimes working up to his shoulders too), but are also causing him quite a lot of pain off the bike. Was wondering if anybody had any ideas about the cause, or even better, a solution to this problem!?

Thanks :)

Posts

  • Hi there,

    I'm no expert, but I'd guess that his position on the bike means that he's putting too much pressure on his wrists. Only your bum and your legs are really designed for bearing weight.

    There's a cycling God by the name of Sheldon Brown who is usually very good for these questions, I'd recommend his view on the situation:

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/pain.html#wrists

    Hope this helps.
  • will3will3 Posts: 2,173
    Often this is an indication that the handlebars are too low. I've suffered from it myself in the past
    Look up "handlebar palsy" and "ulnar neuropathy"
    As he has a road bike with presumably drops, changing and variying the grip position should help. And padded gloves with gel inserts.

    HTH
  • will3will3 Posts: 2,173
    PS forgot to say, whatever you do don't ignore it as if it gets worse and you get as far as the palsy stage it's no fun at all. (but it is reversable)
  • sian_csian_c Posts: 101
    Thanks for the web link, Undercover Elephant - an excellent piece of info. Helpful for me too! It's sounding like it's a posture issue - something we both need to work on.

    He spent a fair bit of time in the shop when he bought the bike having it set up for him (on a jig), so hopefully that's not too far off. But we will be sure to mention it when he goes back soon for the initial check-up. Until then, we'll try to take on board the advice of Mr Brown & hope that provides some relief.

    Cheers.
  • lf he's in pain off the bike as well as on, then the problem is because there's too much body weight being supported by his wrists, as a result of 2 causes; saddle angled too far forward (tip facing downwards) & seatpost too low...
    l think raising the seatpost & moving the saddle further back along the rails will put more body weight down onto the bike & this riding position will be more efficient in all areas, but the riding position at present must be seriously wrong to cause this much aching for that distance in the saddle...
    lf the bike's got drop bars though, these are never the most comfortable, because the wrists tend to be angled sideways & this ain't what nature intended...
  • arturowan wrote:
    lf the bike's got drop bars though, these are never the most comfortable, because the wrists tend to be angled sideways & this ain't what nature intended...

    That, Sir, is complete bunkum.

    Your forearm bones are in their neutral position when in drops/hoods, that is why, when you are standing normally, your hands face your body. It's actually "normal" handlebars which cause you to be twisting your wrists.

    This is why there's a market for "vertical" mice, like the one on my desk, as they stop RSI in your wrist caused by keeping them twisted all day.

    **Edit** Welcome to the forum, please don't see this as me being unfriendly to a noob, we're nice here. :D
  • Agent57Agent57 Posts: 2,300
    please don't see this as me being unfriendly to a noob, we're nice here. :D

    Heh, calling someone a noob isn't very nice, since "noob" itself is a derogatory term. Maybe you meant "newbie".
    MTB commuter / 531c commuter / CR1 Team 2009 / RockHopper Pro Disc / 10 mile PB: 25:52 (Jun 2014)
  • Agent57 wrote:
    please don't see this as me being unfriendly to a noob, we're nice here. :D

    Heh, calling someone a noob isn't very nice, since "noob" itself is a derogatory term. Maybe you meant "newbie".

    Bum, you're right. I always assumed noob/newbie were the same thing, but it appears I'm wrong. :oops: Poor arturowan, I hope I haven't scared him off. :(
  • arturowan wrote:
    lf the bike's got drop bars though, these are never the most comfortable, because the wrists tend to be angled sideways & this ain't what nature intended...

    That, Sir, is complete bunkum.

    Your forearm bones are in their neutral position when in drops/hoods, that is why, when you are standing normally, your hands face your body. It's actually "normal" handlebars which cause you to be twisting your wrists.

    This is why there's a market for "vertical" mice, like the one on my desk, as they stop RSI in your wrist caused by keeping them twisted all day.

    **Edit** Welcome to the forum, please don't see this as me being unfriendly to a noob, we're nice here. :D

    I agree, I've always been led to believe that drop bars allow a far more natural wrist position but also allow you to vary where yuo place your hands far more than straight bars - you can put them in the hoods, place them in a horizontal position at the top or use the drops. Straight bars mean your hands and wrists are locked into the same position for the entire ride.
    Do not write below this line. Office use only.
  • I used to get some hand pain, mostly just pins and needles from my MTB. Reduced this by fitting ergonomic bar ends: http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/cycle/7/Cane_ ... 220000162/

    These certainly reduced the problem, but did not eliminate it. Another tip would be, when first feeling a problem, stretch the wrist/hand, shake it, lift it up, allow blood flow.

    Now switched to tricross with drops have not had the problem at all, although not had a very long ride on it yet.
    "Encyclopaedia is a fetish for very small bicycles"
  • lf drop bars are so ergonomic, then why...
    1 - are MTB's (l.e. flat bars) so overwhelmingly popular now, &
    2 - those who still ride drop bars always ride holding the upper bar (l.e: THE FLAT PART...) &
    3 - when l ride my MTB 100km non-stop, l never get wrist/back pain, when l ride my drop bar bike several km l get wrist pain & back pain...
    FACT - drop bars are for competitive (aerodynamic) cycling for professionals who, like racing drivers, are paid to suffer for their sport.
    MTB's have taken over the market because they are FUNDAMENTALLY THE MORE ERGONOMIC DESIGN - ONLY A FEW diehard ANORAKS (I.e: THE CTC) are still arguing that mtb's are a fad that will be over soon...
  • Think you may just lit a blue touch paper there, arturowan...

    NOT SURE the RANDOM shouting helps your argument or the FACT thing... when what follows is such a piece of subjective commentary...
  • Hi Arturowan, good to see you back. Even if you came back shouty ;)
    arturowan wrote:
    lf drop bars are so ergonomic, then why...
    1 - are MTB's (l.e. flat bars) so overwhelmingly popular now, &
    Fashions change. Why do the yoof of today have their trousers nearing the lower part of their airse? Who knows? I'm too old, I don't understand, as my three year old told me. I would say that over very bumpy ground, such as mountain trails, flat bars are more stable.
    arturowan wrote:
    2 - those who still ride drop bars always ride holding the upper bar (l.e: THE FLAT PART...) &
    Actually, almost all of them I see stay in the hoods position all the time, with their wrists neutral. They do this, because fashion dictates that they have their bars too low, like a yoof's trousers, and they can't stay in drops.
    arturowan wrote:
    3 - when l ride my MTB 100km non-stop, l never get wrist/back pain, when l ride my drop bar bike several km l get wrist pain & back pain...
    Then your bike setup is wrong on the roadie, or you have very poor flexibility/bad core strength.
    arturowan wrote:
    FACT - drop bars are for competitive (aerodynamic) cycling for professionals who, like racing drivers, are paid to suffer for their sport.
    MTB's have taken over the market because they are FUNDAMENTALLY THE MORE ERGONOMIC DESIGN - ONLY A FEW diehard ANORAKS (I.e: THE CTC) are still arguing that mtb's are a fad that will be over soon...
    Bit of a tirade this one; I'm not sure that racing drivers suffer for their sport THAT much. Must be dreadful living in Monaco and dating Pussycat Dolls. I'm sure MTB is here to stay, they're great for what they're great at. I just like my road bike more for the road.
  • Joints generally need enzymes from food primarily raw fruits and vegetables.But we dont eat enough so an ideal solution is Juice Plus+ - 17 raw live (enzymatic) encapsulated fruits and veg.
    For info go to www.juiceplus.co.uk/+sj840237.
    If it's good enough for Kristian House (National Road Champion..)....
    and it certainly keeps me ache free and in good health.
    www.juiceplus.co.uk/+sj840237
    If we don't look after this body where else do we expect to live?
  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 20,049
    must not must not post what's came to mind ....

    arhhhhh!

    :roll:
    Rule #5 // Harden The censored Up.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.
    Rule #12 // The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.
    Rule #42 // A bike race shall never be preceded with a swim and/or followed by a run.
  • will3will3 Posts: 2,173
    arturowan wrote:
    lf drop bars are so ergonomic, then why...
    1 - are MTB's (l.e. flat bars) so overwhelmingly popular now, &...

    fashion
    arturowan wrote:
    2 - those who still ride drop bars always ride holding the upper bar (l.e: THE FLAT PART...) &...

    they don't
    arturowan wrote:
    3 - when l ride my MTB 100km non-stop, l never get wrist/back pain, when l ride my drop bar bike several km l get wrist pain & back pain......

    probably due to the reach or difference in height betweent the bars and saddle being wrong
    arturowan wrote:
    FACT - drop bars are for competitive (aerodynamic) cycling for professionals who, like racing drivers, are paid to suffer for their sport.
    MTB's have taken over the market because they are FUNDAMENTALLY THE MORE ERGONOMIC DESIGN - ONLY A FEW diehard ANORAKS (I.e: THE CTC) are still arguing that mtb's are a fad that will be over soon...

    your opinion is not fact
    FACT
  • will3will3 Posts: 2,173
    PS sell your road bike if you don't like it
    FACT
  • will3will3 Posts: 2,173
    PPS I get more wrist ache on my MTB and tandem (flatbar)
    FACT
  • will3will3 Posts: 2,173
    Agent57 wrote:
    please don't see this as me being unfriendly to a noob, we're nice here. :D

    Heh, calling someone a noob isn't very nice, since "noob" itself is a derogatory term. Maybe you meant "newbie".

    what if the person in question has been a member since 2006 (3years)
  • itboffin wrote:
    must not must not post what's came to mind ....

    arhhhhh!

    :roll:

    Stand aside. I'll do this one.

    Now then, young lady. Your boyfriend.

    Has he been looking washed out a lot recently? Tired? Perhaps his eyesight isn't what it used to be.

    A bit less willing after hours, if you will? Or, dare I ask, have you let yourself go a bit? Ever so slightly? You know, that can happen to the best of us eventually.

    Sounds like you two need to spend some quality time together. Walking in the countryside, maybe. Watching trains go into tunnels. Big fountains. Some fireworks displays, now the season is upon us.

    I'm sure with the right changes in approach, everything will be right as rain before you know it.


    <Phnar phnar, gnurk gnurk>
    Swim. Bike. Run. Yeah. That's what I used to do.

    Bike 1
    Bike 2-A
  • I can't believe I missed that opportunity. :lol:
  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 20,049
    Greg66 wrote:
    itboffin wrote:
    must not must not post what's came to mind ....

    arhhhhh!

    :roll:

    Stand aside. I'll do this one.

    Now then, young lady. Your boyfriend.

    Has he been looking washed out a lot recently? Tired? Perhaps his eyesight isn't what it used to be.

    A bit less willing after hours, if you will? Or, dare I ask, have you let yourself go a bit? Ever so slightly? You know, that can happen to the best of us eventually.

    Sounds like you two need to spend some quality time together. Walking in the countryside, maybe. Watching trains go into tunnels. Big fountains. Some fireworks displays, now the season is upon us.

    I'm sure with the right changes in approach, everything will be right as rain before you know it.


    <Phnar phnar, gnurk gnurk>

    very well put sir i can see all that counselling has paid off :P

    psssst your hi-viz fetish has been rumbled
    Rule #5 // Harden The censored Up.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.
    Rule #12 // The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.
    Rule #42 // A bike race shall never be preceded with a swim and/or followed by a run.
  • sian_csian_c Posts: 101
    Greg66 wrote:
    Stand aside. I'll do this one.

    Now then, young lady. Your boyfriend.

    Has he been looking washed out a lot recently? Tired? Perhaps his eyesight isn't what it used to be.

    A bit less willing after hours, if you will? Or, dare I ask, have you let yourself go a bit? Ever so slightly? You know, that can happen to the best of us eventually.

    Sounds like you two need to spend some quality time together. Walking in the countryside, maybe. Watching trains go into tunnels. Big fountains. Some fireworks displays, now the season is upon us.

    I'm sure with the right changes in approach, everything will be right as rain before you know it.


    <Phnar phnar, gnurk gnurk>

    Almost a week!! I'm impressed :lol:
  • itboffin wrote:
    Greg66 wrote:
    itboffin wrote:
    must not must not post what's came to mind ....

    arhhhhh!

    :roll:

    Stand aside. I'll do this one.

    Now then, young lady. Your boyfriend.

    Has he been looking washed out a lot recently? Tired? Perhaps his eyesight isn't what it used to be.

    A bit less willing after hours, if you will? Or, dare I ask, have you let yourself go a bit? Ever so slightly? You know, that can happen to the best of us eventually.

    Sounds like you two need to spend some quality time together. Walking in the countryside, maybe. Watching trains go into tunnels. Big fountains. Some fireworks displays, now the season is upon us.

    I'm sure with the right changes in approach, everything will be right as rain before you know it.


    <Phnar phnar, gnurk gnurk>

    very well put sir i can see all that counselling has paid off :P

    psssst your hi-viz fetish has been rumbled

    Counsellors hateit if you sit there watching pron on your iphone while they're talking.

    Allegedly.

    I wouldn't know. :wink:
    Swim. Bike. Run. Yeah. That's what I used to do.

    Bike 1
    Bike 2-A
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