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Hill training.

mrchrispymrchrispy Posts: 310
There is a nice long straight hill on a ride I do that climbs 120meters over a mile, I'm thinking of using this for some training, whats the best approach?

climbing is my weakness so I was planning on just doing 5 up and downs the first time couple of times to build my strength and then I though i'd start trying it in higher gears and basically just do as many reps as I could until i felt sick :)

would I get more benifit doing some kinda interval training (ie, hard for 30 secs, recover, repeat)?

btw - its Smithills Dean Road near Bolton if anyone knows it.

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  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    mrchrispy wrote:
    There is a nice long straight hill on a ride I do that climbs 120meters over a mile, I'm thinking of using this for some training, whats the best approach?

    climbing is my weakness so I was planning on just doing 5 up and downs the first time couple of times to build my strength and then I though i'd start trying it in higher gears and basically just do as many reps as I could until i felt sick :)

    would I get more benifit doing some kinda interval training (ie, hard for 30 secs, recover, repeat)?

    btw - its Smithills Dean Road near Bolton if anyone knows it.

    From the top...

    Heh heh.

    You get better at climbing by doing hills.

    1 mile in length will be great to do hill repeats on...

    Just ride up it as many times as you can using downhill as recovery.

    Pace them though so you are going up the last time in the same time as the first.

    But to be honest, I know jack sh*t because I'm rubbish.
  • mrchrispymrchrispy Posts: 310
    just reading, those links, thanks.
    I need to get over there and generate some pain.
    but I'll do it on the QT as Ii have a 2 friends I need to match on the climbs, at least to start with, the aim is to destroy them. Muhahahahahaaa.
  • andy162andy162 Posts: 634
    Hill repeats are excellent weapons for attacking those pesky hills.
    Bury youself completely on some ascents & then ride at 90% for others.
    Push a bigger gear than you would normally and try to increase your speed gradually all the way up.

    If your mind is set on battering your mates on the climbs....it's time to open the hurt box and get stuck in.

    Andy
  • Another trick is to ride a hill much longer than you will ever encounter in normal riding ... this tricks the body to accept the exertion and you will be able to ride much further on the edge of your HR max. Once you survive the much longer hill then your body is always relieved that the effort required is less, Its a trick lance armstrong's coach taught him - that and getting him to sprint (without telling him how long the sprint was going to last)
    Will google link .... once I find it but here are some other tips
    "It’s something we’ve all asked ourselves at the foot of yet another seemingly endless climb – should we sit or should we stand-up? And yet surprisingly few people know the answer.

    You’ll have noticed that some riders prefer to keep their bottoms diligently on their saddles, churning away at the pedals, their relaxed upper bodies making it look far easier than it feels.

    Other riders prefer to stand up and power their way up the slopes, their bikes leaping forward with every pedal stroke.

    Knowing when to sit and when to stand could potentially propel you up our next hill more quickly and easily.

    For many people, it all boils down to personal preference – however there is some logic you can apply to climbing that might prove useful next time you’re at the bottom of a big ascent.

    Standing up
    Pro: You work a wider range of muscle fibres, easing the pressure on any one muscle

    Pro: You can ride at a higher maximum power, allowing you to battle up the steepest sections of a climb

    Con: You use up more energy because you are supporting your body weight on your legs rather than your saddle

    Con: You use more energy because you are working your upper body

    Con: While standing you create slightly more drag, which can slow you down

    Sitting down
    Pro: While sitting, your upper body is relaxed, so you don’t waste any energy

    Pro: You also conserve energy as the saddle takes your weight, not your legs

    Pro: With your body low, you’ll create less drag than you would standing up

    Con: Your legs can feel sore from repeatedly using the same muscles on the climb

    Conclusion
    Staying seated is generally better for climbing, because it uses less energy. If it’s a long or steep climb, you should alternate between periods of sitting and shorter bursts of standing up.

    The short periods of standing will give some welcome relief to your legs and provide a much needed boost of power on the steep sections.

    When you’re climbing in the saddle, focus on spinning your legs in an easy gear, keeping your upper body relaxed.

    Think about maintaining a smooth, fluid pedal stroke and keep your hands resting lightly on the handle bars."
  • andy162andy162 Posts: 634
    True about staying relaxed with a light grip on the bars...Eddy Merckx said you should hold the bars with the same pressure as you would a ballerina's waist...ahhh

    Bet that was just the thought going thru his mind as he battled up rutted cols in 40c heat ...."ballerina's waist....ballerina's waist..."

    Andy
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