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knee pain

leebroad1leebroad1 Posts: 10
edited August 2009 in Road beginners
Hi all i am looking for a bit of advice. I have been riding for about 3 months and have a focus cayo 105 but have recently changed the seat as it was not very comfortable. However i have also just started getting knee pain at the front of my right knee when going up inclines or put under pressure. Would the seat make a difference and are there any other things i could try. I appreciate all advice, cheers...............

Lee

Posts

  • Try raising the seat a little. The new seat may have you a little lower than the old one.
  • Tino4444Tino4444 Posts: 281
    leebroad1 wrote:
    Hi all i am looking for a bit of advice. I have been riding for about 3 months and have a focus cayo 105 but have recently changed the seat as it was not very comfortable. However i have also just started getting knee pain at the front of my right knee when going up inclines or put under pressure. Would the seat make a difference and are there any other things i could try. I appreciate all advice, cheers...............

    Lee

    Hi Lee,

    It could be casued by a number of things:

    1. Is your seat set at the correct height? If its too high or too low then this could cause you some pain in your knee.
    2. Are you wearing spds? are they set up correctly? If not set in the right location this could also cause you some discomfort in your knees?
    3. Have you been cycling hard and/or over training? I sometimes get a slight niggle in my knee after going out for fast paced cycle.

    I hope this helps.

    Tino.
    Speciallized Allez 09...great bike shame about the wheels!!
  • leebroad1leebroad1 Posts: 10
    thanks for your swift replies, I have noted that the new seat is located about 3/4 inch more forward than the previous seat, could fore and aft of seat play a role?
    I have look pedals with red cleats but have not changed the position recently.

    cheers
  • Tino4444Tino4444 Posts: 281
    leebroad1 wrote:
    thanks for your swift replies, I have noted that the new seat is located about 3/4 inch more forward than the previous seat, could fore and aft of seat play a role?
    I have look pedals with red cleats but have not changed the position recently.

    cheers

    I would say it is more likely to be the height of the seat. If you have only been riding for 3 months then it could have taken until now for you to start with the pain.

    When your foot is clipped into the pedal and is at its lowest cycling position does your knee have a slight bend in it? If should have a slight bend (nearly straight) at the lowest point. Too much of a bend in the leg could place your knee under stress especially when pedalling harder up hills.

    Tino.
    Speciallized Allez 09...great bike shame about the wheels!!
  • leebroad1leebroad1 Posts: 10
    will have a play with the seat height and see if this cures the problem, thanks..........
  • WappygixerWappygixer Posts: 1,396
    Get one of these http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/GONIOMETER-RULER-Measures-Degree-of-Spinal-Movement-47_W0QQcmdZViewItemQQ_trksidZp3286Q2em63Q2el1177QQhashZitem53dac36047QQitemZ360152522823QQptZLHQ5fDefaultDomainQ5f0QQsalenotsupported

    You can use it to set your knee angle.25-30 dergrees is meant to give the best return.
    Its a mor eaccurate way than the heal on the pedal way.
    Sit on your bike with your shoes clipped in and your pedal crank inline with your seat tube and then measure.
    I recently started using this method after a few months on knee pain and playing with cleat positions, changed it on Friday and no issues then or on Saturday.
  • PhilbyPhilby Posts: 328
    Might also be worth going to a physio and getting some exercises to strengthen the muscles that affect the knee - which are not necessarily in your knee.

    I had similar problems a few years ago from running - after numerous visits to various medics, I was recommended doing exercises around strengthening the gluteal muscles (in your bum) which are often underdeveloped in cyclists. There are also a couple of muscles in your outer thigh (Iliotibial Band is one) which may also need some physio - see http://www.thestretchinghandbook.com/ar ... e-pain.php for more info.
  • You mention that your new saddle is sitting more forward than your old one. Moving the saddle back or forward will change your effective seat height. By moving the saddle forward then you are lowering the seat height as you're moving the saddle closer to the crank; when moving the seat further back you're increasing the distance from crank to seat, so effectively increasing seat height. I know it's only a matter of mm's but a small movement can make a big difference.

    As your previous saddle position seemed to be fine, I'd make that a good starting position and go from there. Alternatively, if you're otherwise satisfied with the saddle position, then try raising the saddle a (very) little to regain height lost from your current more forward position.

    Jam butties, officially endorsed by the Diddymen Olympic Squad
  • just to mention also that following changing my saddle i did get a lot of cramp/pain in my buttock muscles (glutes) during the rides prior to knee pain. The old seat (standard cayo seat)appeared to fan up towards the back and have a up and down contour for yoy to sit, whereas the new seat (selle italia prolink) tends to be flat so you have no defined area to perch. Do you think the change in saddle is problem or the postitioning of seat.

    cheers
  • Have to agee with Philby...gluteal muscles are very important.

    However, as you haven't been cycling all that long it's probably down to the new seat position being too low. Move the seat back to the middle of the rails if it's further forward than it used to be and maybe raise it a little.

    I believe that frontal knee pain is caused by your seat being too low?! i think!
    pain is temporary..... but it does hurt!
  • cheeheecheehee Posts: 427
    Mookie Blaylock was a point guard for the Atlanta Hawks and 9th all time in NBA for steals.

    Chee'pedant'hee
  • According to Baker's 'Bicycling Medicine' Front of knee pain could be caused by:

      Seat too low Seat too forward Climbing too much Big gears, low cadence Cranks too long I seem to have solved my similar problem by adjusting on these lines and especially changing cranks from 175 to 170
    [/list]
  • dbodendboden Posts: 349
    I was just looking at the 109% method????
    Surely if the top of saddle to pedal axle is adjusted to 109% of your inseam measurement.
    then it will be longer than your straightened leg measurement.

    How can this be?
    What am I missing?
  • andrewjosephandrewjoseph Posts: 2,165
    dboden wrote:
    I was just looking at the 109% method????
    Surely if the top of saddle to pedal axle is adjusted to 109% of your inseam measurement.
    then it will be longer than your straightened leg measurement.

    How can this be?
    What am I missing?

    The 109% is your inside leg with feet flat and no shoes, to a point tight up in your crotch.

    it used to be (and still is in some places) suggested that you point your toes down slightly when riding, this increases leg length (in respect to pedaling). you alo have the height of shoe, plus cleat plus pedalto consider.

    I've read that keeping the feet as flat as possible when pedalling helps power transfer, it also keeps you centre of gravity lower on the bike
    --
    Burls Ti Tourer for Tarmac, Saracen aluminium full suss for trails
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