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Longer ride kit

lost_in_thoughtlost_in_thought Posts: 10,563
edited May 2009 in Commuting chat
Now, having a new bike is making me do a lot more weekend and evening riding... and I'm suddenly aware that I am lacking a couple of things that I ought to be carrying...

For example, I carry a spare tube and 3 tyre levers, but no means to get air into said tube. Nice one, [email protected]

Also, it seems that whenever I stop I get pretty cold pretty quickly. Now, the obvious is not to stop, but I like to do so every so often, for lunch maybe. So why not wear more? Because I warm up again very quickly once I'm moving and I don't like being too hot.

So, any recommendations for

1) A pump of some kind that's pretty foolproof and small
2) Some kind of warm micro-fleecy thing that compacts down to about a cricket ball size?

Also, anything else I should be carrying? I also have allen keys, phone/money/cc/keys, and a waterproof. And, if I remember it, a little ratcheting screwdriver.

Ta very much like!
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Posts

  • tardingtontardington Posts: 1,379
    I've got a nice haglofs windblocker thing that goes quite small? Don't think fleece's squash down that much, because of the air inside them... I suppose leg warmers would help, if you were sure no one would see you. 8)

    Doesn't blackburn do a titchy tiny pump?
  • DonDaddyDDonDaddyD Posts: 12,689
    Where will you be carrying all of this on the Maxima?

    Great thread!!!!

    You and I are in the same boat. Though, I'm gonna have to start buying more cycle clothing, socks I need socks...
    Food Chain number = 4

    A true scalp is not only overtaking someone but leaving them stopped at a set of lights. As you, who have clearly beaten the lights, pummels nothing but the open air ahead. ~ 'DondaddyD'. Player of the Unspoken Game
  • UnderscoreUnderscore Posts: 730
    I carry one of these for tyre inflation duties:
    mosa-mini-inflator.jpg

    Only used on my MTB so far, but did the job well enough for < £7.

    The only other thing that I carry on long rides, other than what you've mentioned, is a "missing link" in case the chain breaks - my multi-tool thingy includes a chain tool. Not had to use it yet but, as an ex-boy scout, ...

    _
  • spasypaddyspasypaddy Posts: 5,179
    pump, get a bontrager air rush tool
    http://www.mikevaughancycles.co.uk/prod ... 2034&rs=gb
    Pump and a CO2 thingy in one. Also comes with a nice mount to put it on the bottle stays, mount holds two (which it comes with) co2 cartridges and the pump

    No idea what to recommend as to a fleece that packs down that small! Maybe have a look at the montagne stuff
  • tardingtontardington Posts: 1,379
    Sorry DDD I saw these in my LBS the other day -you just reminded me 8)
    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/cycle/7/SockG ... 360021453/
  • lost_in_thoughtlost_in_thought Posts: 10,563
    DonDaddyD wrote:
    Where will you be carrying all of this on the Maxima?

    Great thread!!!!

    You and I are in the same boat. Though, I'm gonna have to start buying more cycle clothing, socks I need socks...

    See my response to your thread!

    Also, have made an edit - I realise a fleece won't go down to a cricket ball size, I really meant a microfleece type thing...
  • greg66_tri_v2.0greg66_tri_v2.0 Posts: 7,172
    For example, I carry a spare tube and 3 tyre levers, but no means to get air into said tube. Nice one, [email protected]

    :D:D:D:D

    Copied from DDD's similar thread:
    One of these will take two inners (Conti Race Lights will go in easier than non-lights), two tyre levers, a set of allen keys, two threaded CO2 cannisters, the thing here that's screwed onto the CO2 cannister, and two house keys.

    Phone, food & money go in the jersey pockets. Phone (iphone) has a latex case so doesn't slip on fabric, and CC/notes can go in the case.

    A lot of people are sniffy about the CO2 option - they think that it won't work, and they need a pump. That CO2 adaptor is fantastic. Works every time.

    If I hit three punctures in a ride, that's the cue for the cash/CC to get me home.

    In Canada, I'll take a pump and repair kit if I'm riding somewhere there's no phone signal and no people around for miles. South of England isn't like that.
    Swim. Bike. Run. Yeah. That's what I used to do.

    Bike 1
    Bike 2-A
  • Clever PunClever Pun Posts: 6,778
    edited May 2009
    you want a gillet for when you get cold, pack down super small and will keep you warm...

    :lol:

    I've got a pump canister combo it's pretty much the size of the canister but if you run out you can still use the pump it might take all day to get the right pressure but it'll get you home if you're really unlucky
    Purveyor of sonic doom

    Very Hairy Roadie - FCN 4
    Fixed Pista- FCN 5
    Beared Bromptonite - FCN 14
  • always_tyredalways_tyred Posts: 4,965
    The best you can do in terms of temp regulation is to carry things like arm warmers and a compactable gilet (most of them). This will act as a wind break at least. This sort of kit gives you half a chance of dressing just about warm enough for the cafe stop, but in such a way that you can take some things off / ventilate during the ride.

    There are a multitude of pumps avaialble. In general, the smaller they are, the less well they work. If possible, get a dual action - one that pumps when you push and pull - this will give you the chance of getting enough air into the tyre to enable you to ride with just about enough air. Some will advise CO2 cannisters. Fine, never used them, but once they are gone they are gone.

    I used to carry a valve extender that converted from presta to schraeder, so I could reinflate properly at a petrol station. They don't like you doing this, but its an option if the pump out of sight.

    Beware mini pumps (which are usually mounted behind a bottle cage) scratching your frame. Use electrical tape descretely positioned, in the same way as you do for brake cables (unless internally routed, obviously).
  • Stuey01Stuey01 Posts: 1,273
    Get a pump that is capable of getting your tyres up over 100PSI without taking all day and the strength of 10 men, regardless of the size.
    Not climber, not sprinter, not rouleur
  • cjcpcjcp Posts: 13,345
    2/3 spare tubes
    Tyre levers
    Money/CC
    Mobile
    Chain tool and a couple of spare links
    Allen key set
    Two water bottles

    As for clothing, it depends on how much you feel the cold. I'm a big girl and wear base layers or compression top in all but the warmest of British weather because I don't like to risk getting a chill.

    If it's going to be a warm day, but you have an early start, arm warmers and a gilet are a good bet. Obviously invest in good kit if you're going to be riding the distances.
    FCN 2-4.

    "What happens when the hammer goes down, kids?"
    "It stays down, Daddy."
    "Exactly."
  • lost_in_thoughtlost_in_thought Posts: 10,563
    Now then, this CO2 versus pump thing....

    CO2

    I like the idea that it will inflate a tyre to pressure quickly, but how do you know what pressure one cartridge will get you to? Is there a risk of over-pressurising? Can you regulate the flow of CO2? How fool-proof is it? I am quite the fool, you know.

    Pump

    I find it hard to believe that one small enough to be carried without a frame mount (and I'm not using a frame mount) will actually inflate a tyre to 100psi in less than about 40 minutes. Am I being unfair?

    As for the windproof, good shout but I already carry a LS water/windproof (montane velo) that blocks the wind but does naff all for warmth... hence my wish for a micro-fleecy thing.

    EDIT: Gilet... fleecy or windproof thing? Fleecy gilet might do the trick... I'm just not convinced that arm-warmers will actually warm me up - it's not my arms that get cold!
  • spasypaddyspasypaddy Posts: 5,179
    co2 is a piece of cake, attach the nozzle to valve, screw in co2 cartridge as quickly as possible. Tyre inflates. Each cartridge will inflate one tyre to 120-130psi.

    When you get home you then deflate and reflate with a track pump as CO2 will escape quicker and leave you with softer tyres after about 2 or 3 days
  • bigmatbigmat Posts: 5,132
    +1 for gilet and armwarmers.

    For pumps, I have a mini pump that I must have carried for several thousand miles without needing and had more or less decided that it would probably be useless if I ever did need to use it in anger. I then had a rear blowout in the queue for last year's Dragon Ride. And - miracle of miracles - it actually did the job very well. Not 100psi probably, but enough air to get me to the first food / mechanical stop. Not sure what brand it is, but I think there was a "Bianchi" branded one on offer at Geoffrey Butler quite recently. I'm sure there are many similar pumps out there that will do the job.
  • bratboybratboy Posts: 82
    what do I carry on longer rides is pretty much the same as on shorter ones as the same problems can arise, as I found out on Friday's commute home (3miles into 12miles) when the chainlink rivet started to come out and the chain was jumping around all over the place. My old mutlitool has a chaintool on it that was needed to remove the bent rivet and the broken link, then I replace the link with a powerlink - 10mins for the complete job, but getting the bent rivet out was quite tough.

    I usually carry:

    in a small seat pack -
    powerlink
    multitool - inc all standard allen keys, spoke wrench, chaintool, some box spanners (14 tools in a palm sized tool) and it has a bottle opener too :lol:
    2 tyre levers (steel)
    Spare inner tube,
    glueless patches (or puncture repair kit)
    insultaing tape
    a zip tie or two
    emergency 20p

    in jersey pockets -
    mobile phone
    money for cake stop
    longish, not too heavy cable lock (more for deterant than anything else, I used to have a retractable one with a motion sensitive alarm)
    food (usually fruit bars and gels, dependant on ride length)
    waterproof race jacket (one that packs really small), unless the weather is settled

    on the bike -
    water bottles (usually two for long rides, and stop to refill)
    frame fit pump (that's full size so it takes less strokes to get good psi)

    If I'm racing TT or tri then I use CO2 instead of frame pump, strip out the insulating tape and zip ties from my seat pack, and just have food in the jersey pockets. If racing anything else, then it's usally nothing and a case of "game over".

    My experience with CO2 has been a little indifferent, probably due to rushing during races. You have to be aware that the gas comes out very fast and very cold. So cold infact that it can freeze the valve and if you are really unlucky it can snap or brake off. Also the best CO2 adaptors have a trigger to be able to regulate the flow of gas.

    I have a mate who uses a new double shot mini pump (not sure of the make) that fits in his jersey pocket and you can get over 100psi without too much difficulty.

    For warmth of the bike, put your waterproof on if you think you are going to start to get cold then it'll keep some of the warmth in.

    Hope that's of some help ;)
    SC61.10a: FCN 3, with clip-on guards for winter
    Uncle John: FCN ?? knobblies, or 'fat' slicks n guards

    If you haven't tried these things, you should.
    These things are fun, and fun is good.
  • greg66_tri_v2.0greg66_tri_v2.0 Posts: 7,172
    Now then, this CO2 versus pump thing....

    CO2

    I like the idea that it will inflate a tyre to pressure quickly, but how do you know what pressure one cartridge will get you to? Is there a risk of over-pressurising? Can you regulate the flow of CO2? How fool-proof is it? I am quite the fool, you know.

    JG and Christophe watched me use mine on Sunday. Ask them for an impartial view.

    FWIW: it's utterly foolproof. Takes about 1.5 seconds, so not much opportunity to regulate the flow. The worst that will happen to you is cold fingers. Pressure seems to be self regulating - despite the tyre being hard-as, there's always some more CO2 in the cannister when you unscrew it after use.
    Swim. Bike. Run. Yeah. That's what I used to do.

    Bike 1
    Bike 2-A
  • greg66_tri_v2.0greg66_tri_v2.0 Posts: 7,172
    cjcp wrote:
    2/3 spare tubes
    Tyre levers
    Money/CC
    Mobile
    Chain tool and a couple of spare links
    Allen key set
    Two water bottles

    Pump? Or yet to find out that's missing from the list? :wink:
    Swim. Bike. Run. Yeah. That's what I used to do.

    Bike 1
    Bike 2-A
  • cjcpcjcp Posts: 13,345
    bratboy wrote:
    what do I carry on longer rides is pretty much the same as on shorter ones as the same problems can arise, as I found out on Friday's commute home (3miles into 12miles) when the chainlink rivet started to come out and the chain was jumping around all over the place. My old mutlitool has a chaintool on it that was needed to remove the bent rivet and the broken link, then I replace the link with a powerlink - 10mins for the complete job, but getting the bent rivet out was quite tough.

    I usually carry:

    in a small seat pack -
    powerlink
    multitool - inc all standard allen keys, spoke wrench, chaintool, some box spanners (14 tools in a palm sized tool) and it has a bottle opener too :lol:
    2 tyre levers (steel)
    Spare inner tube,
    glueless patches (or puncture repair kit)
    insultaing tape
    a zip tie or two
    emergency 20p

    in jersey pockets -
    mobile phone
    money for cake stop
    longish, not too heavy cable lock (more for deterant than anything else, I used to have a retractable one with a motion sensitive alarm)
    food (usually fruit bars and gels, dependant on ride length)
    waterproof race jacket (one that packs really small), unless the weather is settled

    on the bike -
    water bottles (usually two for long rides, and stop to refill)
    frame fit pump (that's full size so it takes less strokes to get good psi)

    If I'm racing TT or tri then I use CO2 instead of frame pump, strip out the insulating tape and zip ties from my seat pack, and just have food in the jersey pockets. If racing anything else, then it's usally nothing and a case of "game over".

    Were you a sherpa in a previous life? :)

    +1 for the insulating tape and zip ties. I carry those too.
    FCN 2-4.

    "What happens when the hammer goes down, kids?"
    "It stays down, Daddy."
    "Exactly."
  • always_tyredalways_tyred Posts: 4,965
    Now then, this CO2 versus pump thing....

    CO2

    I like the idea that it will inflate a tyre to pressure quickly, but how do you know what pressure one cartridge will get you to? Is there a risk of over-pressurising? Can you regulate the flow of CO2? How fool-proof is it? I am quite the fool, you know.

    Pump

    I find it hard to believe that one small enough to be carried without a frame mount (and I'm not using a frame mount) will actually inflate a tyre to 100psi in less than about 40 minutes. Am I being unfair?

    As for the windproof, good shout but I already carry a LS water/windproof (montane velo) that blocks the wind but does naff all for warmth... hence my wish for a micro-fleecy thing.

    EDIT: Gilet... fleecy or windproof thing? Fleecy gilet might do the trick... I'm just not convinced that arm-warmers will actually warm me up - it's not my arms that get cold!
    Gilet: If its fleecy it won't be small. There is no magic piece of clothing that does the trick. Light layers at least offer you the option of fine tuning.

    My conceptual problem with CO2 inflators is that its so easy to pinch a tube whilst mounting the tyre, or miss whatever it was that caused the puncture in the first place, such that you discharge the cannister into a leaking tube.

    There is a lot of talk of 100psi. You can get home on about 50psi, you can carry on almost unfettered at about 70psi. 100psi may actually not be best on UK roads anyway.

    No hand pump will easily get you to 100psi in my experience, even frame pumps. Effort is always required. Time is not too much of an issue with 23c's and below. Mtb tyres, yes, but road tyres less so.

    So, I could see an argument for carrying 1 or 2 CO2 cannisters, providing you have a backup pump. In that case, you would only have the pump for the worst case scenario, in which case anything that gets you home will suffice.

    NB: You could probably tape a small pump to the outside of your saddle bag.
  • cjcpcjcp Posts: 13,345
    Greg66 wrote:
    cjcp wrote:
    2/3 spare tubes
    Tyre levers
    Money/CC
    Mobile
    Chain tool and a couple of spare links
    Allen key set
    Two water bottles

    Pump? Or yet to find out that's missing from the list? :wink:

    Boom boom, tsh. :P
    FCN 2-4.

    "What happens when the hammer goes down, kids?"
    "It stays down, Daddy."
    "Exactly."
  • il_principeil_principe Posts: 9,152
    Now then, this CO2 versus pump thing....

    CO2

    I like the idea that it will inflate a tyre to pressure quickly, but how do you know what pressure one cartridge will get you to? Is there a risk of over-pressurising? Can you regulate the flow of CO2? How fool-proof is it? I am quite the fool, you know.

    Pump

    I find it hard to believe that one small enough to be carried without a frame mount (and I'm not using a frame mount) will actually inflate a tyre to 100psi in less than about 40 minutes. Am I being unfair?

    I carry both. A tiny topeak pump and Co2.
    2015 Canyon Aeroad CF SLX
    2020 Canyon Ultimate CF SLX
    2020 Canyon Inflite SL 7
    On the Strand
    Crown Stables
  • schlepcyclingschlepcycling Posts: 1,611
    I have one of these pumps http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/cycle/7/SKS_Airchamp_CO2_Pro_Pump/5110000249/ it has a little trigger to control the airflow and can get my road by tyres easily to 110psi and my mountain bike tyres to about 40psi. There's loads of other available all equally good I'd wager and I get my spare cartridges in bulk from here http://www.tyreinflators.co.uk/

    As for keeping warm +1 for armwarmers and a gilet
    'Hello to Jason Isaacs'
  • bratboybratboy Posts: 82
    You get CO2 cannisters in differnet sizes so you can get different pressure depending on what tyre you are inflating and what size cannister you use. You can also get some nice holder/valve combos from Innovations innovations%20ultraflate%20plus%2005.jpg
    SC61.10a: FCN 3, with clip-on guards for winter
    Uncle John: FCN ?? knobblies, or 'fat' slicks n guards

    If you haven't tried these things, you should.
    These things are fun, and fun is good.
  • vorsprungvorsprung Posts: 1,953
    I tend to carry tools, 2 tubes, a pump, a spare baselayer, a couple of energy bars, mobile and a coat. I have the opposite problem to you. I tend to carry a ton of stuff about.

    My current coat is too big to fit in a small saddle pack/jersey pocket so I'm getting one of these

    http://www.spacycles.co.uk/products.php ... 78s66p1077

    Alledgelly it packs down to the size of an apple and is somewhat water proof + breathable
    Once I get this I will be trying to only take the bare minimum with me on longer rides
  • prawnyprawny Posts: 5,426
    The Leyzene road drive pump is meant to be a good little pump, it's what i'm saving for,

    lezyne-road-drive-pp-med.jpg

    don't you want one of these though?

    blackburn%20carbon%20frame%20pump.jpg

    I know it's a frame pump but mmmm carbon 8)

    To stay warm in the beer garden get a gilet of some dicription.
    Saracen Tenet 3 - 2015 - Dead - Replaced with a Hack Frame
    Voodoo Bizango - 2014 - Dead - Hit by a car
    Vitus Sentier VRS - 2017
  • bratboybratboy Posts: 82
    They do indeed pack down to the size of an apple - my local runners shop has them and I very nearly bought one and matching trousers for the Helvelyn Tri where the rules state you must carry a complete set of waterproof clothing for the fell run up Helvelyn, but borrowed some similar stuff instead.

    If you are lookiing for CO2 or pumps then why not check out the reviews section, they have hand pumps tested up to 125psi :wink:
    http://www.bikeradar.com/beginners/gear/category/tools/cycling-tools/frame-fit-pumps/product/frame-pump-23199
    SC61.10a: FCN 3, with clip-on guards for winter
    Uncle John: FCN ?? knobblies, or 'fat' slicks n guards

    If you haven't tried these things, you should.
    These things are fun, and fun is good.
  • gabriel959gabriel959 Posts: 4,227
    If I were you I will get a lezyne pump, the only mini-pump you will ever need – even I managed to pump my 700x23 Mich Carbons to 90psi without too much effort. They are good looking too and won’t look fugly on your frame. Have a look at Bikeradar’s reviews – they are the best rated one above SKS, Topeak, you name it. CO2 is all well and good but too risky as you only have one go (may be two!) and once gone its gone.

    As for warming up – if you need something cheap, that looks ok and does the job, is there anything better than Mountaine Featherlite Velo? Cheap (£30), wind resistant, packs really small (good for one of your back pockets), it will basically save you in more than one occasion.
    x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x
    Commuting / Winter rides - Jamis Renegade Expert
    Pootling / Offroad - All-City Macho Man Disc
    Fast rides Cannondale SuperSix Ultegra
  • gtvlussogtvlusso Posts: 5,112
    In my small saddle bag: - Tube, levers, multitool, cash + CC + Mobile + duck tape +

    Crank Bros pump taped to frame

    2 x filled water bottles

    energy bars, banana's and flapjack in the back of my cycling jersey.

    3/4 length bib shorts
    cycling jersey (long or short sleeve depending on weather)
    PBK arm warmers
    mitts
    trainer liner socks
    Sidi cycling shoes.
    Lid!

    Thats about it!
  • il_principeil_principe Posts: 9,152
    This is the bees knees in terms of Co2. No need for any holders, just screw in the canister and go. I second the tyreinflators website as being the best source of canisters. Also get one of these: http://www.tyreinflators.co.uk/cls-tyre-inflators/mosa-charger-comfort-grip-disposable-/prod_124.html

    No need to dispose of it each time though, I've had mine for donkeys. Remember that the cartridge will get very very cold in use so best to have a sleeve over it!

    I carry on of these as a backup pump. Fits in a jersey pocket:

    http://www.rutlandcycling.com/6059/Topeak-Rocket-Micro-Carbon-Pump.html?referrer=froogle1&utm_source=google&utm_medium=froogle&utm_campaign=pid6059
    2015 Canyon Aeroad CF SLX
    2020 Canyon Ultimate CF SLX
    2020 Canyon Inflite SL 7
    On the Strand
    Crown Stables
  • FeltupFeltup Posts: 1,340
    I have a second wind CO2 / mini pump http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/cycle/7/Innovations_Second_Wind_Mini_Road_Pump/5360029350/ on the bike and carry one cannister. If I get more than one puncture then I can use the pump which is much better than I expected. I also carry 1 or 2 tubes and a set of patches. A pair of pedros tyre levers. Missing link and a chain tool which has a screwdriver and allen key built in to the handle plus a smaller allen key to cover the main bolts that come loose i.e. headset.

    If I need anything more than that it is phone or credit card or the tenner to get me home.
    Short hairy legged roadie FCN 4 or 5 in my baggies.

    Felt F55 - 2007
    Specialized Singlecross - 2008
    Marin Rift Zone - 1998
    Peugeot Tourmalet - 1983 - taken more hits than Mohammed Ali
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