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Scotland Tour

cjms85cjms85 Posts: 24
edited April 2009 in Tour & expedition
Hi everyone,

I'm planning to do a 5 day tour of Scotland, or at least part of it in early May. I'll probably be setting off from Fort William and working out some kind of circuit root, although at this stage its all very sketchy.

Basically I need some advice as to what equipment I would need for a 5 day tour, as I've never done anything like this before. Also if anyone else is interested their more than welcome to join me, as its always good to have some company on these things.

Obviously I'm goning to need a pania to put things on the back of the bike. Water and food are also vital, although I imagine that much of this can be procured along the way. Compass, maps, phone, high viz, appropriate clothing etc.

I'm thinking of staying at bothies to reduce weight, so that I won't need to take a tent with me but where can i find the locations of bothies? People must have done this sort of thing before, where would you recommend to look for more information?

Any help and advice would be great,


Cheers, Chris

Posts

  • LittleB0bLittleB0b Posts: 416
    There aren't many bothies* near roads (and since you are asking in the road section i'm guessing it's not a MTB tour) - in fact i can't think of any - so it will be tent or SYHA - or some combination there of.

    The advantage of bunkhouses/yha's is drying rooms and cooking facilities, and beding, which means you don't have to carry stove, sleeping bag ect. On the other hand camping is free - and you can just stop where you ike. But if you are having to buy additional waterproof paniers to carry stuff in - the cost of SYHA could be cheaper for a one off.



    *A bothy is usually a hut, with bacic sleeping and communual areas that open and free to anyone - they are usually in remote mountain areas involving a good few hours walk in. Despite rumors you are more likely to be sharing the floor with a old snoring man and his dog than the swedish women's hill walking club.
  • andymillerandymiller Posts: 2,856
    Little B0b's advice sounds good to me, but:

    http://www.mountainbothies.org.uk/

    I thought May was too cold for midges?
  • guyhallguyhall Posts: 1
    Chris,

    Sounds like a great plan! My other half and I have spent a few long weekends and a week long trip touring in Scotland/Hebrides. Sustrans routes where they exist we found pretty good, but I don't think you can't link up a nice circular route only on the national cycle network. where available we generally found them nicer than ones we would have picked of a map ourselves.

    I agree with the earlier comments - you will get wet (but it's worth it!) and i would recommend camping, you can wild camp in most of Scotland, so that makes life a bit easier if you can be bothered to carry the weight of a tent. I think if you are going as far as carying a tent - do think about carrying some of the weight on the front of the bike - we found the bikes a lot more comfortable that way, but the expense of getting all the gear if its just for five days is probably not worth it.

    The other thing I find useful is at least one bag you can get into easily. I find my paniers a bit fiddly to open when i want to stop for a snack / photo, so I use an easier to get into bag strapped onto the rack, my other half has a bar bag with map case on which is great.

    padded cycling shorts of some sort are worth getting if you don't have them already - they made life a lot more comfortable, as are gloves of some sort.

    enjoy the trip!
  • pneumaticpneumatic Posts: 1,989
    LittleB0b wrote:
    *A bothy is usually a hut, with bacic sleeping and communual areas that open and free to anyone - they are usually in remote mountain areas involving a good few hours walk in. Despite rumors you are more likely to be sharing the floor with a old snoring man and his dog than the swedish women's hill walking club.

    Not the ones I go to 8) . Nothing but Scandanavian girl guides asking whether it is ok to bank up the fire so it is hot enough for a sauna :shock:

    Damn, I just woke up :( :oops:


    Fast and Bulbous
    Peregrinations
    Eddingtons: 80 (Metric); 60 (Imperial)

  • snorrisnorri Posts: 2,981
    PhilipD wrote:
    You don't "need" a compass
    A compass should be considered an essential part of your kit if you intend staying in bothies, to suggest otherwise is highly irresponsible.
  • BodhbhBodhbh Posts: 117
    snorri wrote:
    A compass should be considered an essential part of your kit if you intend staying in bothies, to suggest otherwise is highly irresponsible.
    Agree. I often curse if I forget to bring one on an exploration of the local area nm touring. It's one the few things I want in immediate reach while riding for sanity checking the direction etc. Must weight all of 20 or 30grams, for the utility.
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