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What stats would you want for Turbo Training

birdy247birdy247 Posts: 454
Making a turbo training website, which some people have already given me some useful feedback.

http://www.turbotraining.co.uk

At the end of the plan, you can enter your distance, so you can monitor your progress for a particular plan.

Also shown is your distance compared to the average distance clocked, and where you rank on that plan.

Other stats shown is total distance turbod, total turboing time, average turbo distance, average turbo time and how your stats compare to others using the site.

Can anyone think of any other realistic stats they would find useful?

Posts

  • BronzieBronzie Posts: 4,927
    Isn't it rather meaningless to compare performance on a turbo trainer without knowing the resistance that everyone is riding at? The only meaningful way of doing this would be to compare power output data using a calibrated power meter wouldn't it or maybe by comparing how quickly the wheel stops turning from various speeds?
  • birdy247birdy247 Posts: 454
    Granted, but i still thinks its useful on an individual basis so you can see if your distance are improving. I see your point with it being hard to compare.

    I have done one thing on the site where you select your make/model of turbo trainer and set resistance to lowest then cycle as far as you can in 10 mins.
  • eheh Posts: 4,854
    total distance turbod, total turboing time, average turbo distance, average turbo time

    I can't see why any of those are of any use at all. Turbos shouldn't be used for distance work, they should be used for short, sharp hard interval sessions or recovery sessions.

    Also I wouldn't bother trying to compare any data with anyone elses, as it tells you pretty much f**k all about your ability as a cyclist, even power.

    Using the turbo it really isn't that hard to determine if you were fitter than say last month, and then go race which will show how good you are.
  • Turbos shouldn't be used for distance work
    As a coach, I'd disagree
  • eheh Posts: 4,854
    Turbos shouldn't be used for distance work
    As a coach, I'd disagree

    Remind me to never use you as a coach! But seriously unless the conditions outside are absolutly awful then just get out there. I can see no benefits from doing mind (ball?) numbing distance turbo work where your HR is likely to go through the roof due to cooling issues and and there is no wind resistance, gradients etc. Worse it breeds a quality of rider who can't even romove their hands to drink without wobbling all over the place.

    On the turbo: Intervals good, distance bad.

  • Remind me to never use you as a coach!

    no need to remind me. I only work with people with an open mind to training, without bizarre opinions on what is or isn't good.
    your HR is likely to go through the roof due to cooling issues
    use a fan
    and and there is no wind resistance, gradients etc
    use the resistance on your turbo.
    Worse it breeds a quality of rider who can't even romove their hands to drink without wobbling all over the place
    it does? I'd love to see some evidence for this.
  • eheh Posts: 4,854
    your HR is likely to go through the roof due to cooling issues
    use a fan
    A bloody big one may just work.
    and and there is no wind resistance, gradients etc
    use the resistance on your turbo.
    If wind resistance, gradient, quality of road surface were constant then fine, but they aren't. One way to combat some of these is to change position and yet you don't get that understanding from just clicking up the resistance on the turbo.
    Worse it breeds a quality of rider who can't even romove their hands to drink without wobbling all over the place
    it does? I'd love to see some evidence for this.
    Never met a triathlete :wink:

    Personally I'd like to see some evidence that doing distance work on a turbo has any benefits, then you may convince me. Until then I'll go outside and ride thanks and come bakc mentally and physically better than anyone slogging away for hours on end on the turbo.
  • grantusgrantus Posts: 690
    Jeez, people are so quick to criticise!

    I think the site's really good mate! Thanks!

    I've posted a link to it on my club's forum
  • eh wrote:
    Turbos shouldn't be used for distance work
    As a coach, I'd disagree

    Remind me to never use you as a coach! But seriously unless the conditions outside are absolutly awful then just get out there. I can see no benefits from doing mind (ball?) numbing distance turbo work where your HR is likely to go through the roof due to cooling issues and and there is no wind resistance, gradients etc. Worse it breeds a quality of rider who can't even romove their hands to drink without wobbling all over the place.

    On the turbo: Intervals good, distance bad.
    Doing the work: good
    Not doing the work: bad

    Clearly people are not going to gain skills from a turbo ride but cycling is a pretty low skill sport (compared to many, like say golf, cricket, football) so the primary purpose for training is to elicit the physiological adapatations required to go faster, further.

    Training on a turbo is an excellent substitute to outdoor riding and in many cases a far more efficient method, especially when time is limited, conditions don't permit riding outdoors or for other reasons, such as injury, rehab etc. As you point out, it helps to have a good set up, especially effective cooling*.

    There is nothing to say one shouldn't do longer efforts on a turbo. What matters most is that one does the work, not so much where one does the work. It is quite easy to vary the intensity and mimic the physiological demands. Of course there are subtle differences, particularly neuromuscular, which depends a bit on the type of trainer you use.

    I just had an email from a former client (we are good friends now days) who is a former elite road/track rider. They just did a 5-hour ride on their trainer :shock: But for them, riding outdoors in 6 feet of snow just isn't an option and they really love doing work indoors.

    Personally I couldn't go that long. I did 90-min last night and I could probably manage 2 hours if I had to. But yes, intervals are perfect for indoor work. and day before I did my 2x20-min TT efforts.

    * and on this, here is a discussion about the differences in indoor vs outdoor power:
    http://alex-cycle.blogspot.com/2009/01/ ... ining.html
  • time remaining until the sun comes out in my location
  • NIce site, I think I wll be back for more
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