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Effect of bike weight of climbing

tommy_tommytommy_tommy Posts: 91
During the winter months I have slightly modified my diet and training ( only medium to high intensity training). As a result, I reduced my body weight from 10st 12 lbs which is the weight I raced at the end of last season to 10 st 5lbs today. At 5 ft 10" I do not plan to drop any more body weight so I have turned my attention to the weight of my bike. At the moment, it weighs in at 21.5Lbs, I notice that the average 1000 quid road bike weighs in around 19lb. However, the cost of upgrades to reduce my bike by 2.5lbs is fairly significant. i.e new fork, new seat post, saddle. I was curious as to how much difference this reduction would make on a typical UK sportive climb. I found this site http://www.analyticcycling.com/ and I inputted my bike weight versus a test bike with a 1 Kg weight reduction . On a 10% gradient of 1 mile riding at about 230 watts the saving is a measly 6 seconds. If I reduce the power output the time saving reduces (Is this correct) . If this calculation is correct, I think I will keep my cash in my wallet.

Does this calculation appear correct. Would consider this to be a fair estimation on the time saved for a 1 Kg drop in bike weight.

Posts

  • redddraggonredddraggon Posts: 10,862
    An 8kg bike is a good weight, and the time gain by loosing weight on the bike is only worth it if the wheels and frame are stiff - not much more annoying while climbing is the brake blocks rubbing on the rim.

    Also that 6 secs could easily be lost in the descent if the bike doesn't have handling that suits you....
    I like bikes...

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  • softladsoftlad Posts: 3,513
    makes sense. although a good set of lightweight wheels & tyres would make the biggest impact, because the weight lost there is rotating weight, not dead weight...
  • chrisw12chrisw12 Posts: 1,246
    If you want to loose weight then get creative. There are cheap light bits out there it's a case of shopping around and looking/learning from the internet.

    Also have a look at your kit and what you carry on the bike. Do you really need to carry that multi tool, the pump, the whatever. How heavy are your shoes, do you need socks? Is the Lidels special top you bought holding sweat and making you heavy?

    These were all questions I asked myself. Might seem a bit extreme, but two thoughts: add up all the little bits and you might make a big saving. I also realised that I was looking at fancy expensive parts to save weight where as taking less food out with me was having the same weight effect.
  • MettanMettan Posts: 2,103
    softlad wrote:
    makes sense. although a good set of lightweight wheels & tyres would make the biggest impact, because the weight lost there is rotating weight, not dead weight...

    + 1 Agreed.

    Get some lighter-weight wheels Tom (look at rim weight in particular). Due to budget, I'm on a 10kg bike (Ribble) - next purchase is hopefully going to be either the RS80 rear or a pair of RS80's - (380g rims). I've got WH-5600's on at the mo.
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