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powermeters

flattythehurdlerflattythehurdler Posts: 2,314
Does anyone know whether irrespective of cost, there are any durable, reliable, lightweight power meters which can EASILY be transferred between bikes?
Ta
Dan
Dan

Posts

  • TitaniumTitanium Posts: 2,056
    Wirelss Powertap, you just change the rear wheel and swap the display over. Takes a minute to do.
  • Does anyone know whether irrespective of cost, there are any durable, reliable, lightweight power meters which can EASILY be transferred between bikes?
    Ta
    Dan

    Yeah, I second powertap - wired or wireless.
    I've had mine working reliably for two years now, with battery changes being the only maintenance.
  • Could you possibly elucidate. Does it have a special rear wheel? I would like to have one on my training bike and my good bike, but especially om my fixie which I commute on. How would this work? Can you supply me with enough of an answer so the lads in the bike shop don't laugh at me when i ask.
    Thanks.
    Good to hear from you titanium BTW. Hope all's well in the states.
    Dan
  • Could you possibly elucidate. Does it have a special rear wheel? I would like to have one on my training bike and my good bike, but especially om my fixie which I commute on. How would this work? Can you supply me with enough of an answer so the lads in the bike shop don't laugh at me when i ask.
    Thanks.
    Good to hear from you titanium BTW. Hope all's well in the states.

    You have the hub built into almost any wheel you want. So you could swap it between your training and racing bike. takes a few seconds.

    unfortunately, the PTs are geared hubs. Some of the older PTs could be converted to fixie, but this can't be done at present.

    marketing alert: don't bother with your LBS for PT. Come to RST we have the best UK prices, the most knowledge about them and have been using power since '93.

    cheers
    ric
    Professional cycle coaching for cyclists of all levels
    www.cyclecoach.com
  • Could you possibly elucidate. Does it have a special rear wheel? I would like to have one on my training bike and my good bike, but especially om my fixie which I commute on. How would this work? Can you supply me with enough of an answer so the lads in the bike shop don't laugh at me when i ask.
    Thanks.
    Good to hear from you titanium BTW. Hope all's well in the states.

    You have the hub built into almost any wheel you want. So you could swap it between your training and racing bike. takes a few seconds.

    unfortunately, the PTs are geared hubs. Some of the older PTs could be converted to fixie, but this can't be done at present.

    marketing alert: don't bother with your LBS for PT. Come to RST we have the best UK prices, the most knowledge about them and have been using power since '93.

    cheers
    ric
    I actually own my LBS (it's a long story, and only a hobby but I LOVE it) :-)
    Dan
  • bahzobbahzob Posts: 2,195
    Another vote for Powertap. Moved it from summer 10 speed Roubaix to winter 8 speed SCR over the weekend. Simple as changing a cassette.

    That said the drawback of the Powertap is that it limits rear wheel choice. If the simple transfer requirement includes TT bikes with a disc rear then its a non-starter.

    If I was thinking about buying a power meter I would wait a few months. Some more options like:
    http://www.bikeradar.com/mtb/news/article/interbike-quarq-power-meter-real-bike-computer-12672

    will be available next year (I think because some of SRMs patents expire but not sure)

    This may bring prices down (including second hand SRMs) and also stimulate some competition on things like ease of moving from bike to bike.
    Martin S. Newbury RC
  • Thanks. Might wait and see what santy brings
    Dan
  • bahzob wrote:
    Another vote for Powertap. Moved it from summer 10 speed Roubaix to winter 8 speed SCR over the weekend. Simple as changing a cassette.

    That said the drawback of the Powertap is that it limits rear wheel choice. If the simple transfer requirement includes TT bikes with a disc rear then its a non-starter.

    If I was thinking about buying a power meter I would wait a few months. Some more options like:
    http://www.bikeradar.com/mtb/news/article/interbike-quarq-power-meter-real-bike-computer-12672

    will be available next year (I think because some of SRMs patents expire but not sure)

    This may bring prices down (including second hand SRMs) and also stimulate some competition on things like ease of moving from bike to bike.

    This is not really true.
    I have just bought some wheel covers(wheelbuilder.com) that are made to fit all sorts of rim/hub combos incl powertap hubs. These are qualty covers - the only thing you dont get is the noise you get from a carbon disc wheel. They are reasonably priced, and ship to UK prompt.
  • This is not really true.
    I have just bought some wheel covers(wheelbuilder.com) that are made to fit all sorts of rim/hub combos incl powertap hubs. These are qualty covers - the only thing you dont get is the noise you get from a carbon disc wheel. They are reasonably priced, and ship to UK prompt.
    Which is OK as long as you don't have to ride under UCI regulations, which prohibit the use of such add on fairings. Riders who are just riding in the TT scene in the UK and the US are OK as they don't follow UCI regs - but if you are targeting an event at national of international level it is likely UCI regs will apply.
  • I just wanna see how much (or litytle) power I'm knocking out on the way to work.
    Dan
  • I just wanna see how much (or litytle) power I'm knocking out on the way to work.

    Yeah, that's how it starts.
    Then you'll wanna push yourself harder.......just a bit......
    Then you're hooked.



    www.powerjunkiesanon.com :D
  • This is not really true.
    I have just bought some wheel covers(wheelbuilder.com) that are made to fit all sorts of rim/hub combos incl powertap hubs. These are qualty covers - the only thing you dont get is the noise you get from a carbon disc wheel. They are reasonably priced, and ship to UK prompt.
    Which is OK as long as you don't have to ride under UCI regulations, which prohibit the use of such add on fairings. Riders who are just riding in the TT scene in the UK and the US are OK as they don't follow UCI regs - but if you are targeting an event at national of international level it is likely UCI regs will apply.

    Are all cyclesport events(RR & TT) in Oz covered by UCI/equivalent Alex?
  • i think they are. and canada as well. not that i'm alex

    ric
    Professional cycle coaching for cyclists of all levels
    www.cyclecoach.com
  • The Australian time trial association doesn't follow UCI regs but all road & track racing and all championships (including TTs) do as they come under the Cycling Australia umbrella (CA and each State Association) - who have adopted the UCI regs wholly. This applies at elite and masters levels. On top of that, juniors also have some local rules restricting equipment further (no deep section rims for example, gear restrictions and so on).

    The UCI regs don't apply in the US in USAC events though (they have their own regs), unless it's a UCI event or a selection trial for UCI events.

    So here, if all I did was ride ATTA events, then I could pretty much ride whatever I like as long as it's safe. But I couldn't then ride that non-UCI reg bike at a State or National TT championship or any other race run by CA accredited cycling clubs.
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