Forum home Road cycling forum Training, fitness and health

% effort in Team Time Trials

jpembrokejpembroke Posts: 2,569
edited September 2007 in Training, fitness and health
Just out of interest, what is the difference in effort exerted by the trailing riders in a Team TT? Does the 2nd rider in line exert more effort than the 3rd, 4th etc or is it the same? i.e. does it get easier the further back you are? Just curious.
I'm only concerned with looking concerned

Posts

  • The few I have ridden have all been 100% from everyone all the time :lol:

    That might just be because we are all rubbish!
  • The few I have ridden have all been 100% from everyone all the time :lol:

    That might just be because we are all rubbish!

    I have found it harder when following than when leading!
  • ricadusricadus Posts: 2,379
    The worst bit is when you have drifted back to the rear of the forward line and have to get back on at full speed.

    I've only done two 6-man TTTs and the first was fantastic because everyone was about the same level and co-operated and communicated throughout. Result: we caught the team in front as they/we approached the finish.

    The second one was completely unbalanced by a couple of super-strong Dutch and German riders who were more focussed on their own places on the GC than by working together. Result: half the team were dropped, myself included. Still, I got their time though...
  • jpembroke wrote:
    Just out of interest, what is the difference in effort exerted by the trailing riders in a Team TT? Does the 2nd rider in line exert more effort than the 3rd, 4th etc or is it the same? i.e. does it get easier the further back you are? Just curious.
    It has been studied:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entre ... ds=2318782

    Essentially there is no diference between 2nd and 4th spot. In perfect conditions and riders riding within an inch or so of the wheel in front it may possible to detect some differences but in real world conditions (as shown by the study quoted) there is limited difference.

    Added to that, the main differences are likely down to the skill of drafting. Some are better at it than others.

    Riding behind a larger group however it does get easier.
  • Hi there.

    It depends a lot on the size of the riders! Me, I'll ride on the big guy's wheel every time.

    Seriously though if you have a range of sizes and abilities it's worth putting the weaker riders behind the bigger ones, so they get more shelter.

    Other obvious things - everyone should ride at the same speed, weaker riders just take shorter pulls. Nobody should miss a turn, even if they go through and straight off again, they need to go take their turn.

    Use a single line if it's only 4 riders, double lines don't usually work unless there's at least 6 riders - but then double lines are usually faster, as the jump to get back on is easier.

    The most important thing is not to speed up when you hit the front - you need to keep a constant pace in the forward-moving line. It is then up to the front rider to peel off, not for the 2nd rider to come around him. A TTT is not a chaingang!

    Cheers, Andy
  • Forgot the most import bit of team time-trialling:

    Figure out who the weakest rider in the team is - and make sure it's not you!
  • The trouble with putting weaker riders behind stronger ones is that they tend to drift off the back. So the best tactic say for a 4-up TT is Strong-Weak-Weak -Strong so that the man at the "back" can pull through and fill the gap if the third (or 2nd) man starts to fade. This certainly worked when I was coaching a club team for the BCF 100k nationals.
  • Forgot the most import bit of team time-trialling:

    Figure out who the weakest rider in the team is - and make sure it's not you!
    That depends on how many riders you need at the finish. In a 4 man TTT when time is taken on the third rider, being the 2nd weakest rider can be worse....
  • It all depends on the make up of the team. The stronger/strongest rider should do more on the front than the others. If they do not then you will lose time.

    I once rode the South Eastern RC 2 Up TTT which was about 35 miles over a sporting course. My team rider hit the front twice, Once after 100 yards at the start and the second time 100 yards frm the finish. He told me afterwards that every time he came alongside me to pass he could sense his speed dropping. He wasn't sure whether or not I could keep that pace going for the whole ride so rationalised that is was better to keep on my wheel and save his energy to keep up with me on the climbs. Wise decision.


    By the way we won the event.
  • chrisw12chrisw12 Posts: 1,246
    It can also be very difficult to work out who the strongest rider is. For example on my usuasl team, I have the fastest 25 time by about a minute but I don't cope well with on-off efforts, so by numbers I'm the strongest but actually I'm the weakest.
Sign In or Register to comment.