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Training Book

paulrobertspaulroberts Posts: 4
Can anyone recommend a training book for cycling (or indeed any websites). I'm a tourer but will soon be getting a Bianchi with a view to getting a lot fitter and stronger. I need some info about guidlines, schedules etc.

Any pointers greatly appreciated.

Cheers

Paul

Posts

  • BeaconRuthBeaconRuth Posts: 2,086
    There are lots of ways to learn how to become a better cyclist - can you be more specific about what you mean by 'getting a lot fitter and stronger'? Do you intend to race? If so, what kind of racing?

    In my experience, no one book covers everything in a perfect way for anybody, and a more effective way to pick up advice and useful suggestions is to mix with experienced cyclists - discussions on forums like this are useful but there's no substitute for mixing with cyclists 'in the flesh.' Are you in a club? If not, I strongly recommend joining one - for a relative novice there is far more to be learnt about cycling from the experienced, older guys in a club than any amount of theory in books or on the internet.
  • Hi,

    I think what I mean by 'fitter and stronger' is pushing myself so that I can be competitive firstly with myself and then maybe with others.
    I used to do a lot of running, but due to injuries had to stop. I would like now to see if I can achieve something in the saddle.
    I've done a couple of Audax events and it is the longer distances that appeal, when running, a 10k race would have been a sprint, 10 miles was 'middle distance' and a marathon was, well, a marathon!! So I guess I'm looking at 50+ mile events with the odd 10 miler as a 10K equivalent

    In running parlance I was a good 'club runner' (2hrs 46 mins for a marathon)- I'd like to achieve the same sort of std but on a bike.

    I realise now of course that my question was not specific enough. So, I'd like to get a good level of aerobic fitness with some strength stuff gradually built in. What I don't know is the kind of time/distance/intensity I need to start at to provide a good base to move on.

    There is a club here and fully intend to join up as soon as I can, I suppose that I'm a little nervous about joining the ranks in case I'm a 'dodderer' - I suppose a good club will welcome everybody. Looking back, I can see that being around more experienced athletes was invaluable experience, and thanks for suggesting the idea of a club.

    Regards

    Paul
  • BeaconRuthBeaconRuth Posts: 2,086
    Paul,
    Thanks for the further explanation - what you've said now makes a lot of sense and I should think you have the makings of being just as good a club cyclist as you were a club runner. Certainly, all club cyclists I know would treat any sub 3-hr marathon runner with due respect - it may be a different sport but all serious athletes know what kind of commitment and dedication performances like that entail.
    What I don't know is the kind of time/distance/intensity I need to start at to provide a good base to move on.
    If you've completed a couple of Audaxes, you have a competitive running background and you're undaunted by 50miles, then you're almost certainly capable of holding your own in most cycling clubs. Whereabouts are you based and which club are you thinking of joining? (Usually someone on here can comment about local clubs.) Every club has a slightly different 'flavour' or emphasis - some are more seriously into racing than others, some are better at welcoming newcomers, some try to encompass all branches of the sport whereas others will admit to being mainly focused on touring or road-racing or time-trialling. Most larger clubs have several club rides each week, over different distances and at different speeds - you can only find out which will suit you best by contacting a club or looking at their website.
    There is a club here and fully intend to join up as soon as I can, I suppose that I'm a little nervous about joining the ranks in case I'm a 'dodderer' - I suppose a good club will welcome everybody. Looking back, I can see that being around more experienced athletes was invaluable experience, and thanks for suggesting the idea of a club.
    Don't be nervous - you don't sound like a 'dodderer' to me! Honestly, the vast majority of clubs will welcome you with open arms - you're a proven athlete who obviously knows how to work hard and is keen and serious about converting to cycling because of injury. For example, my club is a very good, traditional cycling club and you might learn a few things from browsing our excellent website - have a look here: http://www.beaconrcc.org.uk/ . There's a lot of advice about joining a club, going on club runs, racing etc which would be relevant to any new cyclist. It might be useful anyway.

    Good luck - and keep in touch with this forum!
  • ColinJColinJ Posts: 2,218
    Hi Paul - try taking a look at The Cyclist's Training Bible.
  • nolfnolf Posts: 2,016
    A good training book-

    Serious Cycling- Burke PhD

    That will tell you how to get involved in cycling competitively.

    But for a start-

    Join a club

    If you've done lots of touring you probably have a good endurance base, so maybe use this summer to start tweaking.

    Do some intervals and fast rides (club rides are good for this).

    Get a heart rate monitor and try maxing out your heart rate, once thats done
    spend 2 minutes at 90-95% of max heart rate, then rest until your heart rate goes back down to 75% of max. Repeat this 4/5 times in the middle of a ride with a long warm up and cool down at each end.

    Club rides will teach you speed and bike handling skills in a group, that should last you for most of the summer.

    Winter endurance training- long slow rides- more group riding stuff.

    Next year get a BC silver (or Gold) membership and buy a racing license.
    Then enter as many races as possible to learn how to do it properly.
    "I hold it true, what'er befall;
    I feel it, when I sorrow most;
    'Tis better to have loved and lost;
    Than never to have loved at all."

    Alfred Tennyson
  • Thanks all for the help and advice.

    I'll join the local club then!! My local one is Mid Shropshire Wheelers based in Shrewsbury.

    Thanks 'nolf' (!?) for the tips about some stuff to get going (although I'm still waiting for my nice new Bianchi). Already got a HRM, so up to speed there.

    What do you mean by 'long and slow' - 3-4 hrs at 75 ish %?

    Thanks again for your help.

    Cheers
    Paul
  • nolfnolf Posts: 2,016
    Thanks all for the help and advice.

    I'll join the local club then!! My local one is Mid Shropshire Wheelers based in Shrewsbury.

    Thanks 'nolf' (!?) for the tips about some stuff to get going (although I'm still waiting for my nice new Bianchi). Already got a HRM, so up to speed there.

    What do you mean by 'long and slow' - 3-4 hrs at 75 ish %?

    Thanks again for your help.

    Cheers
    Paul

    Long and slow should be the basis of your winter rides (and in my schedule I do 1 mid week in the summer)

    I was referring to your heart rate when I said 75%- try to keep your average heart rate over the course of the ride at 75% of maximum heart rate.

    3 or 4 hours at this lower heart rate will provide the basis of your training for the coming year. It improves your muscular endurance and how efficiently you use your energy reserves- will make you better at shifting fat (if necessary) and lengthen how long you can go for on your body's stored energy.

    Essential as a base for next years speed work.
    Then later on in the year bring in faster rides at higher heart rates to strengthen the cardiovascular system, and do intervals or fast rides to up the speeds you can maintain.
    "I hold it true, what'er befall;
    I feel it, when I sorrow most;
    'Tis better to have loved and lost;
    Than never to have loved at all."

    Alfred Tennyson
  • mac220mac220 Posts: 53
    If you're going for some training advice head over to

    http://www.cyclingforums.com

    In the cyling training and power training forums there are some excellenth threads from the some well informed people for example Andy Coggan who provides training advice to US cycling, and yes he actually posts over there.

    There's another definition for LSD training which is Long Steady Distance, which i think is more suited to the type of training. This type of training is not slowly plodding along. It should be at a pace which requires concentration and effort to maintain.

    Anyway check out the thread 'its killing me but......' in the cycling training section. there's a whole load of really good advice in there and you can see the effect it has had for the guy who followed the advice i,e, he's moved his threhold power (60minutes) from something like 120watts to 250.

    Good Luck and keep us up to date with how it all goes. also here's a overview of the different types of training sessions, one of the really usefull sections is the description of the adaptations you get from different types of training,

    http://www.sykkeltrening.no/forum/dokumenter/powerbased_training.pdf
  • Very interesting reading Mac220... the pdf link you added at end of your post. When I've finished my current training plan and had my week off, I'll get my power ratings (5s, 1min, 5min and FT) and try some power training.
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