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the male buttock

Simon L2Simon L2 Posts: 2,908
edited June 2007 in Campaign
...now that I've got your attention.

In furtherance of my mission to wind Spire and Patrick up like tops I alluded to the 'fact' that Rothbrook had a butt that you could open bottles with (actually, Rothers, old mate, it's not that great, but you still owe me a drink).

This brought on a touch of the vapours. There was even mention of sphincters. Now here's a different take on it. Mrs L2 and I went to a party which was pretty much middleaged - in fact the only non-middleaged attendees were the teenaged children brought along so that we could all check out what had happened to those little scraps of flesh we hadn't seen for fifteen years. Mrs L2, a lady in her middle years, wore white jeans with little sparkly things emboidered to the rear. Very fetching, or so one of our oldest friends thought when she (note) said 'S........ you've got the censored of a twenty year old'. Mrs L2 did her best to be offended, but failed miserably.

So - here's my thought. Women compliment each other on their bodies all the time. They take notice. But (setting aside that my paean to the Rothbrook bod was a spoof) (although, come to think of it, he's not bad looking) the same can't be said of men. And yet....some of us spend a good deal of time in the company of other men who are dressed in tight clingy stuff (as in cycling club, Patrick, not the Llangollen Chamber of Commerce). Do you/don't you look at their bums? And do you allow yourself an appreciation of a nicely turned buttock, or, for that matter, a shaved calf? For that matter, do you, on your journeys round art galleries, look at the pictures by Tiziano, or sculptures by Michaelangelo, and admire the male form?

I'm hoping for replies which show some sign of intelligence, but I fear that most of them will come from the forum's ladies. Oh, well...
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Posts

  • Simon, if you're coming out be upfront about it. Don't beat about the bush.

    Nobody ever got laid because they were using Shimano
  • Simon L2Simon L2 Posts: 2,908
    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Smokin Joe</i>

    Simon, if you're coming out be upfront about it. Don't beat about the bush.

    Nobody ever got laid because they were using Shimano
    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    Anthropology students please note - there'll be plenty more like this - but then he is a chap who associates the choice of derailleur with sexual success.
  • Tourist TonyTourist Tony Posts: 8,628
    You were in my house on Saturday morning, Simon. I was wearing shorts.
    Should I have been more careful?

    If I had a stalker, I would hug it and kiss it and call it George...or censored
    If I had a stalker, I would hug it and kiss it and call it George...or censored
    http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/?o=3 ... =3244&v=5K
  • CunobelinCunobelin Posts: 11,792
    Wasn't there one of those "research projects" a couple of weeks ago, it was discussed at work....

    The figures are approximate unles I can find a reference.

    80% of women didn't think they were complimented on their appearance enough by colleagues and friends
    It was also suggested that 65% of women who received such a compliment form a male colleague would consider it "inappropriate" and possibly a form of sexual harassmnet.

    The true figures and article are here

    I know where I stand, if I complimented a female on her looks, body or appearance, it would be reaction of the wife I was worried about rather then the response form thecomplimentee

    <b><i>He that buys land buys many stones.
    He that buys flesh buys many bones.
    He that buys eggs buys many shells,
    But he that buys good beer buys nothing else.</b></i>
    (Unattributed Trad.)
    <b><i>He that buys land buys many stones.
    He that buys flesh buys many bones.
    He that buys eggs buys many shells,
    But he that buys good beer buys nothing else.</b></i>
    (Unattributed Trad.)
  • PizzamanPizzaman Posts: 703
    I generally don't find myself looking at mens' buttocks, having said that, occasionally you come across a pair (bad choice of words?!) that demand attention.

    Ladies and Gentleman, I give you ex- 400m World Champion Michael Johnson. I have never seen him run on TV without thinking 'is that the biggest set of buttocks in the world?' or 'How does that man stay upright?'

    No-one in cyling could ever match the promenance of Johnson's censored .
    Dave
  • <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Pizzaman</i>

    I generally don't find myself looking at mens' buttocks, having said that, occasionally you come across a pair (bad choice of words?!) that demand attention.

    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    This just about sums it up. Most men are profoundly uninterested in other men's bodies - it's only when we see an extreme that we show some sort of interest.
  • NoodleyNoodley Posts: 1,725
    Chris Hoy's thighs are splendid.
  • AllanTAllanT Posts: 156
    Hmm interesting post. I personally never check out another guys censored , but I have to admit to sneakily checking out one or two lady sports people I compete alongside (both cycling and running).

    Not sure if this is about where I come from (live on an Island with a population of 75,000), but everyone appears a bit more open when speaking to other people than in this article. Someone will speak to someone who they don't know and the other party will not feel threatened by it. I often get complimented on my dancing when I'm out clubbing by people I don't know.

    As regards the body, well I've noticed my censored gets grabbed a lot when I'm out, hopefully it's just people showing their approval.

    Re the effect of lycra was out on my TT bike the other day doing some training, wearing my skinsuit, etc, on the way home had to pass through a group of people as the road was closed. Took my helmet off (no point in wearing it when you're scooting through a crowd, and it gives better visibility, passed into a girl I knew from school, and she remarked that I looked sexy, then one of her mates grabbed my censored !! This was in the middle of the street!!

    On the other hand was cycling to a 1st Aid class, obviously wearing my normal riding attire of lyrca and got asked if I could put something less revealing on in future? I hadn't even thought about the fact it might show a bit more than some people might feel acceptable (just being my normal riding attire, hate riding in baggy stuff).

    Seems to be more acceptable for a woman to compliment a guy, than vice versa, as mentioned most girls feel free to grab my censored without asking, not sure what would happen if the same thing vice versa myself!!! Most girls I know (or even don't know) seem a bit suprised if I compliment them, but don't seem to get defensive about it.
  • redcogsredcogs Posts: 3,232
    in my minds eye i suppose i have an 'ideal' image of what the 'perfect' male form consists of. Skin colour is irrelevant. Very little surplus fat is attached, appropriately muscular yes, but not 'muscle bound' a la Charlie Atlas or the morons who over develop using steriods. Proportions are pretty important, leg to torso length, cranium size, things like that. . But the overall 'image' of a bloke is also pretty crucial, although for this discussion i realise this is more of a cultural factor. Can't stand the 'medallion male'.

    The best contemporary example of a male who might fit my 'ideal' would probably be that chap who fronted the tv series 'Coast' (not the long haired one), who carried a brolly, and exhibited uncommon decency and manners. Another might be David Tennant for shape and size, and also his human qualities.

    <font size="1">please look up to the stars.. </font id="size1"><font size="6"><font color="red">***</font id="red"></font id="size6">
    <font size="1">please look up to the stars.. </font id="size1"><font size="6"><font color="red">***</font id="red"></font id="size6">
  • Simon L2Simon L2 Posts: 2,908
    Allan - interesting - but again your experience is more about male/female appreciation (that's as neutral a word as I can conjure up) than about men's appreciation of each other's bodies.

    Patrick, is (as ever) completely wrong [:D]. Men flock to watch other men play sport <i>in their millions</i>. They idolise Ryan Giggs, John Terry, Thierry Henry, or whoever because of their physical prowess. Are we really to believe that the admiration that attends the accomplishments of a footballer, or a rugby player is entirely divided from an appreciation of their bodies?

    I've had an excellent lunch (mint and pea risotto, since you didn't ask) and I've decided that I might have been a tad unkind to Smokin Joe. It is the case that gay men receive and grant appreciation with a facility that straight men lack - and I have to admit that I both enjoy being greeted by 'Simon, you're looking sooooo good' (with an expert eye giving me the once over) and respect the thought behind 'Simon, darling, you look tired - you've been working too hard'. And, I've got into the habit of returning the compliment. It's pleasant. But....I haven't yet crossed the Rubicon whose far bank has me turning up to a CTC ride and running a hand over the backside of some old stager with the words 'Brian, my, but you're looking trim'.
  • Seriously, I do think that men can admire a male body but most would not admit to it. Even in this more enlightened age there is a fear of being thought of as homosexual, or even a worry that one may have homosexual leaning oneself. Male fashion tends also to be different from that geared to females, which is often designed to show off the curves of the female body with tight fitting jeans and so on. Men's clothing is generally cut in a fairly neutral manner.

    Nobody ever got laid because they were using Shimano
  • PizzamanPizzaman Posts: 703
    To be fair, when I see a sportsman who is really toned, I do wish I had a flat somach, instead of the fledgling beer gut I am trying to fight at the moment. Also, if I think things like that, it tends to be on a health and fitness level mosly, i.e. if a bloke looks really toned I envy the fact that odds are he is much fitter than me. I am not really afraid of being called gay, but I would never say another bloke that he looked good because it would be a bit embarrassing, and the other bloke would think I was taking the mickey. I do mention it to a male friend if I think they have lost weight (especially if they have been trying to), because that is just a nice thing to say, and if a bloke or a woman said that to me I would be pleased!
    Dave
  • Phil RussellPhil Russell Posts: 1,736
    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Smokin Joe</i>

    Don't beat about the <i>bush</i>.

    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    Freudian slip / pun ? Not intended I am sure.

    Cheers, Phil[:D]
  • Simon L2Simon L2 Posts: 2,908
    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Smokin Joe</i>
    Men's clothing is generally cut in a fairly neutral manner.
    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    I take your point, but I'm not sure you're right. Men's clothing tends to accentuate the slimness of our hips, and often gives our shoulders a bit of a puff.

    Take a look at George Bush's walk (sorry, Phil, but we just can't let the bush thing lie fallow). He walks like an ape. It's a caricature of a walk, a bizarre show of masculinity which bears no relationship to the ordinary middle-aged body that's doing the walking. Blair does it too, but with a slightly boyish twist. Now I know it's a stretch to suggest that Bush's election owed anything to his physical attributes, but don't you think that the mock Van-Damme (and think about that one!) posture might be part of the game. Don't you think that American Football with those padded shoulders and codpieces stuffed in stretchy stuff might, just might, be part of a peculiar fetishizing of the male body that, as far as one can judge, appeals directly to straight men?

    All of which is a shame. Because men are good to look at, <u>simply, for themselves</u>, and not for the kind of martial overlay that fashion or some sports overlay on them. At their best they're a splendid testament to nature's economy. And cyclists, refined, pared, seemingly untiring ([:I]) are, collectively, as splendid as any.
  • AsterixcpAsterixcp Posts: 6,251
    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by redcogs</i>


    The best contemporary example of a male who might fit my 'ideal' would probably be that chap who fronted the tv series 'Coast' (not the long haired one), who carried a brolly, and exhibited uncommon decency and manners.

    <font size="1">please look up to the stars.. </font id="size1"><font size="6"><font color="red">***</font id="red"></font id="size6">
    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    Nicholas Crane. After reading one of his books 20 years ago I decided to try cycle touring. I'm still trying but that's not his fault[;)]

    Pour vivre heureux, vivons le v‚lo..
    Pour vivre heureux, vivons le v‚lo..
  • redcogsredcogs Posts: 3,232
    Aye, thats the one Asterix.. a star.


    <font size="1">please look up to the stars.. </font id="size1"><font size="6"><font color="red">***</font id="red"></font id="size6">
    <font size="1">please look up to the stars.. </font id="size1"><font size="6"><font color="red">***</font id="red"></font id="size6">
  • <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Simon L2</i>

    Allan - interesting - but again your experience is more about male/female appreciation (that's as neutral a word as I can conjure up) than about men's appreciation of each other's bodies.

    Patrick, is (as ever) completely wrong [:D]. Men flock to watch other men play sport <i>in their millions</i>. They idolise Ryan Giggs, John Terry, Thierry Henry, or whoever because of their physical prowess. Are we really to believe that the admiration that attends the accomplishments of a footballer, or a rugby player is entirely divided from an appreciation of their bodies?<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    Er....well, yes. A glorious run from Ryan Giggs is a joy to watch, but it's the run, not his body that I enjoy watching. A very good female friend of mine likes watching rugby with a gay friend because if she watches rugby with her boyfriend (ex top class himself) he's only interested in the game and the moves and not in the blokes bodies.

    The only sports in which the bodies become relevant is in gymnastics and some of the diving events where the ability to hold a certain position makes the body shape an integral part of it.
  • Dr_NickcpDr_Nickcp Posts: 53
    Pretty much all sport has an element of homoeroticism. Essentially nobody is completely gay or straight, and playing or watching sport (along with fighting) is a socially acceptable way of acting on these sublimated desires.

    On the other hand I imagine it is perfectly possible for a straight man to admire the male form on a purely aesthetic, non-sexual level. (Being of the non-straight persuasion I can't claim any direct experience about this).
  • marky2484marky2484 Posts: 160
    Well....at the risk of exposing myself to a great deal of ridicule....I do very occasionally see a really fit/good looking bloke ( not always the same one you understand) and think to myself that he looks pretty good. It hasn't got to the stage where I check guys out like I do women.....Would probably be hesitant about telling said blokes tho' - many men are terrified of seeming gay...which is a bit of a shame really.[:)]

    If I had a baby elephant, I'd be asking my girlfriend some SERIOUS questions.....
    If I had a baby elephant, I\'d be asking my girlfriend some SERIOUS questions.....
  • CecyCecy Posts: 166
    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Dr_Nick</i>

    Pretty much all sport has an element of homoeroticism. Essentially nobody is completely gay or straight, and playing or watching sport (along with fighting) is a socially acceptable way of acting on these sublimated desires.

    On the other hand I imagine it is perfectly possible for a straight man to admire the male form on a purely aesthetic, non-sexual level. (Being of the non-straight persuasion I can't claim any direct experience about this).
    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    Ah, but do you ever find yourself admiring the female form on a purely aesthetic, non-sexual level?

    cc
    cc
  • Dr_NickcpDr_Nickcp Posts: 53
    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Cecy</i>

    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Dr_Nick</i>

    Pretty much all sport has an element of homoeroticism. Essentially nobody is completely gay or straight, and playing or watching sport (along with fighting) is a socially acceptable way of acting on these sublimated desires.

    On the other hand I imagine it is perfectly possible for a straight man to admire the male form on a purely aesthetic, non-sexual level. (Being of the non-straight persuasion I can't claim any direct experience about this).
    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    Ah, but do you ever find yourself admiring the female form on a purely aesthetic, non-sexual level?

    cc
    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    I think so, yes. I can see a woman and think she looks good without there being any sexual attraction. I think it is also possible to look at the gender that you are attracted to in a non-sexual way as well; not all encounters are sexually based (obviously).

    The point is, if anybody, of any gender or any orientation, wants to admire a nice pair of buttocks, that's ok.
  • <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Cecy</i>

    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Dr_Nick</i>

    Pretty much all sport has an element of homoeroticism. Essentially nobody is completely gay or straight, and playing or watching sport (along with fighting) is a socially acceptable way of acting on these sublimated desires.

    On the other hand I imagine it is perfectly possible for a straight man to admire the male form on a purely aesthetic, non-sexual level. (Being of the non-straight persuasion I can't claim any direct experience about this).
    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    Ah, but do you ever find yourself admiring the female form on a purely aesthetic, non-sexual level?

    cc
    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    Not very often. [:I]
  • CecyCecy Posts: 166
    Okay, say you're looking at a person, whatever their sex and whatever your sexuality, and you are thinking "what a beautiful body". How do you decide whether that is a purely aesthetic thought or not?

    cc
    cc
  • spirespire Posts: 4,077
    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Smokin Joe</i>

    Simon, if you're coming out be upfront about it. Don't beat about the bush.


    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    True, beating about the bush ([:D][;)]) is surely a very heterosexual thing! [:I]
  • Simon L2Simon L2 Posts: 2,908
    well I never!
  • papercorn2000papercorn2000 Posts: 4,517
    Nobody has ever admired Michaelangelo's David and said "Hm, nice chisel-work from the Florentine boy!"

    Mind, I'm not taking any bets.

    God told me to skin you alive.
    http://www.ekroadclub.co.uk/
    God told me to skin you alive.
    http://www.ekroadclub.co.uk/
  • Fab FoodieFab Foodie Posts: 5,155
    Simon L2, interesting subject!

    I don't have any problem admiring other men's bodies, or acknowledging that other men are good looking etc. Whether I would mention it to them is another matter, I guess it depends on how well I knew them and in what context. If somebody thought me gay for having an opinion on such a matter, well so what. I'm pretty comfortable with my sexuality, wife and 3 kids (no...not overcompensating!).
    I work with a predominantly female colleagues and to be able to have a sincere opinion about a male physique/looks can be quite a benefit.

    So to answer your question, yes I can admire the male form, and no, I don't feel the need to keep it a secret.

    The pessimists of this world are rarely disappointed....
    Fab's TCR1

    The pessimists of this world are rarely disappointed....
    Fab's TCR1
  • There are two reasons for admiring the body of someone of the same sex, one would be envy where you wished you had the looks and/or physical prowess of that particular person, and the other would obviously be that you find the person sexually attractive to one degree or another. And probably a large grey area in between.

    Nobody ever got laid because they were using Shimano
  • simoncpsimoncp Posts: 3,260
    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote">Originally posted by Simon L2

    Women compliment each other on their bodies all the time.

    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    Do they? In my experience they compliment each other on their clothes before bitching about body and clothes when a woman is not present. Womens magazines often run photos of celebrity women caught off guard - no make up, cellulite, bad choice of clothes etc. Women do look at each other much more than men, but it seems to me that is because they want to assess the competition, and many women seem to take delight in the unattractiveness of other women. Men don't seem to do this about other men, but perhaps this is because football, beer, women and other hobbies take up all the available conversation time.
  • NoodleyNoodley Posts: 1,725
    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Smokin Joe</i>

    There are <b>two reasons </b>for admiring the body of someone of the same sex, one would be <b>envy</b> where you wished you had the looks and/or physical prowess of that particular person, and the other would obviously be that you find the person <b>sexually attractive </b>to one degree or another. And probably a large grey area in between.

    Nobody ever got laid because they were using Shimano
    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    You are obviously not as attractive as I am - I look at other men and pity them. [:D][:D]
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