Zabel admits

Matchstick ManMatchstick Man Posts: 565
edited May 2007 in Pro race
BONN, Germany, May 24, 2007 (AFP) - One of the top cyclists of

the past 15 years, Erik Zabel of Germany, admitted on Thursday that he had taken the banned blood booster EPO while competing for German team Telekom in 1996.

"I took EPO in 1996 but I stopped taking it after a week because

of secondary effects," a visibly emotional Zabel told a press conference.

Zabel, a 36-year-old sprinter, was a silver medallist in the

2006 world championships and has finished top of the points classification in the Tour de France six times.

jr/gj/ak


AFP
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  • Cyclo2000Cyclo2000 Posts: 1,923
    oh dear

    Usquequaque in Ventus
    Get into yourself to get yourself out of your self. Then try to lose yourself.
    Usquequaque in Ventus
    Just once I would like to be called "Sir", without someone adding "You\'re making a scene".
  • sylvanussylvanus Posts: 1,125
    Why "oh dear"? Every confession moves us one step towards a fairer sport - we're gradually getting there.
  • So, should he face a 2 year ban?
  • methodmethod Posts: 784
    I suppose he should, it saddens me though.
  • This is great for the sport that he's come clean. He's by far the biggest name to do so.

    It also backs up the assertion of the soigneur that he tried it once and it didn't work for him.

    TdG
  • It sounds like there's a bit of a truth and reconciliation commission going on in Germany at the moment.

    In theory Zabel should get a two year ban. I'd hope, however, that the UCI see some sense and encourage others to admit to past mistakes. Let's get it out in the open whilst making sure that there has to be an end to this culture of doping that afflicts the sport.
  • You said "UCI" and "Sense" in the same sentence.

    If he doesn't face a ban, where does that leave everyone else? Why should Basso face a ban?
  • squiredcpsquiredcp Posts: 964
    Does that mean he will be banned, effective immediately?
  • quote:Originally posted by iainf72

    You said "UCI" and "Sense" in the same sentence.

    If he doesn't face a ban, where does that leave everyone else? Why should Basso face a ban?




    He shouldn't, but he should be stripped of his Giro though. Everyone should be encouraged to come clean and start with a new slate.

    With this whole Telekom thing, I'm beginning to feel the first glimmer of hope that I've had for this sport for a long time.

    TdG
  • quote:Originally posted by iainf72

    If he doesn't face a ban, where does that leave everyone else? Why should Basso face a ban?
    Is trying EPO for a week akin to spending tens of thousands of Euros consulting with an expert in blood doping?

    Strictly speaking they should both be banned but I think Basso's crime is more serious than Zabel's. Plus there is a statute of limitations so a doping confession for something that happened over ten years ago, at a time when there was no test for EPO, compared to using doping to win a race last season seem different to me.
  • andrewgturnbullandrewgturnbull Posts: 3,861
    Hi there.

    Sensible move by Zabel.

    He's 37 - so now (or the end of this season) would be a good time to retire and move into management.

    Now that he's got his confession off his chest he can slip nicely into a job as assistant DS at T-Mobile knowing that he's done the right thing and set an example for all the young riders under his wing.

    Then he can invite them all round to his own bicycle museum and show off his green jersey from the '96 tour.

    Cheers, Andy

    http://www.stirlingtri.co.uk
  • Zabel and virenque both did it in 96. So did Riis?

    Mleh Mleh Mleh
  • quote:Originally posted by andyp
    Strictly speaking they should both be banned but I think Basso's crime is more serious than Zabel's. Plus there is a statute of limitations so a doping confession for something that happened over ten years ago, at a time when there was no test for EPO, compared to using doping to win a race last season seem different to me.


    Of course we're assuming Erik is telling the truth. All these "weak momemnts" and "only did it once" and "I only attempted doping" - hmmmm.

    The only choice is to ban him. Unless there is a statute of limitations of course.
  • WittgensteinWittgenstein Posts: 158
    "I took it for just a week"...yeah right!
  • andrewgturnbullandrewgturnbull Posts: 3,861
    quote:Originally posted by Steve Austin

    Zabel and virenque both did it in 96. So did Riis?



    Hi there.

    No then, why would it benefit T-Mobile to admit to doping in 1996 in particular?

    I wonder what effect this might have on the credibility of a rival team owner?

    Cheers, Andy

    http://www.stirlingtri.co.uk
  • I did wonder when i saw he didn't turn up for the Tour of Catalonia yesterday.....

    Jocksyboy
  • cswebbocswebbo Posts: 220
    As ianf72 says, I cannot believe that there are still people here that believe this 'i only did it the once', 'i intended to dope but did not' excuses!
    They have not volunteered this info, they are being forced to do it as a result of a book written by Jef D'Hont.
    No different to David Millar and his coming clean excuses............caught red-handed by the police.

    If they are still racing,2 year ban. If not banned from working in cycling for 2 years.

    There are still A LOT OF EX-PRO'S working in Pro-Tour Teams who have skeletons in their cupboards. Expect a lot more confessions along the lies of above.
  • squiredcpsquiredcp Posts: 964
    In the book that has led to all these confessions didn't it say that Zabel tried drugs briefly and didn't like them? Thus I tend towards believing his confession. It is also good that others are admitting to using substances for a number of years, rather than just the "moment of weakness" excuse.

    I'm not a great one for remembering facts, but it will be interesting to see the periods that people admit to. A number of current pros could be brought into the mix as former T-mobile talent - some already tainted, some not... Sevilla, Savoldelli, Kloden, Vino, etc.
  • The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • methodmethod Posts: 784
    So how long do you think before Riis steps down?
  • quote:Originally posted by method

    So how long do you think before Riis steps down?
    Why should he? Whilst not confessing he has, in recent years at least, never denied doping.

    I don't understand why a few people on this forum do not allow for people to change. In 1996 it was, it would seem, the norm to take EPO in the Tour. What needs to happen now is get to a position where it's the norm to not take EPO in the Tour, or any other race. Riis has seen how the wind has changed and brought in a strict anti-doping regime to his team. He should be applauded for that, not condemned.
  • methodmethod Posts: 784
    I'm not suggesting he should step down, but with the recent bout of Telekom riders comming clean about 1996, do you think he will have pressure from CSC?
  • hevipedalhevipedal Posts: 2,475
    It's still my opinion we need an amnesty to clear the past and stop the cupboard scraping and get a clean fresh start.

    Hevipedal
    Phrase of the week - I've got a bike. You can ride it if you like.
    It's got a basket, a bell that rings and
    Things to make it look good.
    I'd give it to you if I could, but I borrowed it.

    51yrs old and Proud of it - Made it to 87kg 2 more to go for the target.
    Pedal to Paris Sept 2007
    Hevipedal
    It's not only people that are irrational; 1.4142135623730950488016887242096980785696718753769480731766797379907324784621
  • RadsmanRadsman Posts: 122
    think amnesty is a great idea but only if they have effective method for stopping future doping. It is quite clear that bans aren't working as a deterrent. I believe in-depth regular testing is the way to go and if things look funny, keep them out of races. If it happens repeatedly, well then, the team will probably consider dropping them.
  • afx237viafx237vi Posts: 12,630
    My copy of Hell on Wheels is now soiled.
  • quote:Originally posted by afx237vi

    My copy of Hell on Wheels is now soiled.


    [?][?] I didn't really have you down as the naive type, afx.

    Anyway, you can always offer it up as a prize for PTP[:D]
  • vermootencpvermootencp Posts: 1,298
    quote:Originally posted by afx237vi

    My copy of Hell on Wheels is now soiled.

    And Anquetil's wins should be erased from history?

    And now for some rambling thoughts. Short-term this looks bad, long-term it's good for the sport. Cycling's way ahead of other sports, just as it has been with other factors such as diet, management techniques and sponsorship. This will cause a small or even big revolution in the way things are done. People aren't going to stop riding their bikes.


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "I'll do what I can to help y'all. But the game's out there, and it's play or get played. That simple."
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "I\'ll do what I can to help y\'all. But the game\'s out there, and it\'s play or get played. That simple."
  • cswebbocswebbo Posts: 220
    Riis has managed to dodge this issue for 10+ years now. This is the worst case senario now. Virtually his whole team and back up staff have now confessed in the last 1-2 weeks.
    I thought last years Operation Puerto/Tour de Farce was bad enough, but this year is heading the same way.
    Looks like i might be taping over my 1990's collection of cycling videos.
  • vermootencpvermootencp Posts: 1,298
    Also: why the hell are people surprised? This happened > 10 years ago, everyone knew that everyone did it, there were no tests.... C'mon now.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "I'll do what I can to help y'all. But the game's out there, and it's play or get played. That simple."
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "I\'ll do what I can to help y\'all. But the game\'s out there, and it\'s play or get played. That simple."
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