Forum home Road cycling forum Road beginners

First ride on road bike and have backache

charlie29charlie29 Posts: 15
edited October 2014 in Road beginners
I had my first ride on my first road bike today and whilst I got on really well with it generally and enjoyed it a lot, I think my handlebars need adjusting. :? I've got really bad backache and found it a stretch to reach the front of the handlebars (where the breaks are). :( I think the handlebars seem very low, but then I've only ever ridden a hybrid before.

I'd appreciate any advice! :) Thank you.

Posts

  • Dippydog3Dippydog3 Posts: 414
    Here are a few options.

    Get a proper bike fit.

    If that's too expensive blag someone at the LBS to do it for your for nothing.

    If thats not possible post a picture of yourself side on riding and let the feathers fly!

    Read a book about bike fitting and do it yourself.

    If you have an ipad buy the Bike Fast Fit app and then sort it reslly easily.

    Once you are fitted then thats it. Rule five.
  • mcnultycopmcnultycop Posts: 2,143
    Did you buy it from a shop? Are you happy they sold you the right size?
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,196
    charlie29 wrote:
    I had my first ride on my first road bike today and whilst I got on really well with it generally and enjoyed it a lot, I think my handlebars need adjusting. :? I've got really bad backache and found it a stretch to reach the front of the handlebars (where the breaks are). :( I think the handlebars seem very low, but then I've only ever ridden a hybrid before.

    I'd appreciate any advice! :) Thank you.

    It's different to a hybrid, quite obviously. If you are still uncomfortable after several hours worth of riding, then think again.

    (brakes, btw - not 'breaks')
  • Thanks everyone for the advice.

    Thank you Imposter for highlighting the typo - that helped :?
  • gethincerigethinceri Posts: 1,159
    Imposter wrote:
    charlie29 wrote:
    I had my first ride on my first road bike today and whilst I got on really well with it generally and enjoyed it a lot, I think my handlebars need adjusting. :? I've got really bad backache and found it a stretch to reach the front of the handlebars (where the breaks are). :( I think the handlebars seem very low, but then I've only ever ridden a hybrid before.

    I'd appreciate any advice! :) Thank you.

    It's different to a hybrid, quite obviously. If you are still uncomfortable after several hours worth of riding, then think again.

    (brakes, btw - not 'breaks')

    (Different from, btw - not 'different to')
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,196
    gethinceri wrote:
    (Different from, btw - not 'different to')

    It's a good try - but you need to do some more googling...
  • gethincerigethinceri Posts: 1,159
    Nope, can't be bothered, if someone's petty enough to point out an error with a comment which includes an error I'm petty enough to point it out.
    It's the only try I need because I'm right.
    FACT.
    Whatever.
    And all the other internet bs.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,196
    edited October 2014
    gethinceri wrote:
    Nope, can't be bothered, if someone's petty enough to point out an error with a comment which includes an error I'm petty enough to point it out.
    It's the only try I need because I'm right.
    FACT.
    Whatever.
    And all the other internet bs.

    If you're going to be arrogant, at least try to be right. 'Break' v 'brake' is worth pointing out. The rest is irrelevant. Typing 'FACT' in capitals does not make you correct unfortunately. I'm surprised it has to come to this, but seeing as you can't be bothered to google, I'll do it for you:

    http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/words ... than-or-to
    http://alt-usage-english.org/excerpts/fxdiffer.html
    http://www.writing-skills.com/60-second ... romtothan/

    There's loads more like that. If you can be bothered to read them, you will see that 'from' and 'to' are more a matter of preference than than precision - so either is correct. On that note, I will shut up. Hopefully, you will too...
  • kajjalkajjal Posts: 3,380
    Have a read on bike setup and take into account some people have their bars level with their saddle for a more relaxed position and others prefer their bars a few inches lower for a more agressive position. If needed you can flip you stem into the upright position.
  • cattytowncattytown Posts: 647
    If it was your first ride, you may just need a little time to adapt to the position - it is quite different from a hybrid.

    Paul.
    Giant Defy 2
    Large bloke getting smaller :-)
  • BozmanBozman Posts: 2,570
    cattytown wrote:
    If it was your first ride, you may just need a little time to adapt to the position - it is quite different from a hybrid.

    Paul.

    +1

    As above, plus I'd use one of the online bike fit sites like competitive cyclist just to make sure that you're roughly in the right place.

    I don't get folk telling beginners to go for a bike fit, Joe Bloggs might spend £300 on a bike and then he's expected to spend another £150 on a bike fit, madness.
  • diamonddogdiamonddog Posts: 3,402
    As mentioned by Bozman the Competitive Cyclist site will give you various options for set to suit your riding style.
    If you cannot get something close to being a comfortable set up then as others have mentioned perhaps the bike is too big for you.
  • Mikey23Mikey23 Posts: 5,306
    core muscles might not be as strong as they might and the unaccustomed position may be causing ache. Might be nothing wrong and you just need to see if it persists
  • PhilbyPhilby Posts: 328
    Perhaps consider doing some exercises that will help increase your flexibility and core strength - yoga or pilates are ideal for this.
  • craigus89craigus89 Posts: 887
    Stretch out before you ride for 5 - 10 mins next time.

    When I was starting late last year I had aches and pains all over for the first few weeks, neck, back, shoulders... they did go though.
  • BobbinogsBobbinogs Posts: 4,841
    craigus89 wrote:
    Stretch out before you ride for 5 - 10 mins next time.

    When I was starting late last year I had aches and pains all over for the first few weeks, neck, back, shoulders... they did go though.

    err, I would urge caution before embarking on pre-activity stretching. There are some stretches you should only really attempt after exercise and most other stretches will need the person to be warmed up with the correct dynamic routine.

    It might be worth a visit to a Sports physio who can help diagnose the problem and help with the right pre/post activity routine. A good physio will charge for the session but it will be less than the price of a carbon bottle cage, with more benefits.
  • Schoie81Schoie81 Posts: 749
    I still consider myself a 'beginner' myself, but I agree with what Imposter said near the top - after one ride its too early to say there is a problem. You don't say how long the ride was - if you went out and after a mile your back was hurting and you had to give up, then yes, maybe you've a problem that needs sorting. On the other hand, if you went out on a road bike for the first time, riding in a position new to your body and did 30miles and you've got back ache afterwards, you need time to get used to it.

    I came to road bikes from MTBs and it took me probably a month or more to get used to the riding position, and longer than that to build some core strength which took some of the weight off my forearms and wrists and stopped them aching. If I were you, I would keep riding regularly for a couple of weeks or so, and if you still think you've got problems, or if it gets worse, then look at changing things.
    "I look pretty young, but I'm just back-dated"
  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 19,847
    Mikey23 wrote:
    core muscles might not be as strong as they might and the unaccustomed position may be causing ache. Might be nothing wrong and you just need to see if it persists

    my bet would be this, core muscle strength and the new position, stick with it, keep the mileage reasonable and don't ignore pain, if it gets worse or doesn't go away stop. If you have any neck shoulder or knee problems the stop and look for a bike fit, otherwise I'd say give it a few weeks.

    oh and take it easy don't try and rush into hard efforts on a new set up too soon.
    Rule #5 // Harden The censored Up.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.
    Rule #12 // The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.
    Rule #42 // A bike race shall never be preceded with a swim and/or followed by a run.
  • styxdstyxd Posts: 3,234
    do you really need core strength to ride a bike?
  • Thanks everyone for the advice!

    It should be the right size, I went to the shop (which is quite a long way from my home) to see it and they confirmed my size. I actually ordered it online then and it was delivered, so I've had to set saddle/handlebars etc up myself.

    My core strength should be ok, I have been running (and racing) for years and always work on that.

    I didn't ride it for long, far shorter than my usual cycle on the hybrid. It felt uncomfortable in the lower back quite soon into the ride and got worse, so I had to go home early. :(

    I wonder whether I might try flipping the stem and/or trying a shorter stem - it's a unisex bike and I am female....

    Thanks again.
  • diamonddogdiamonddog Posts: 3,402
    Bike shop staff do not always know much about bike fit or bikes and are just trying to get a sale unfortunately, although this might not be the case with you.
    If you could give some idea ie a photo of the bike, size and set up along with a bit about yourself height etc it could be useful for the forum members to offer any advice re set up and bike size.
  • craigus89craigus89 Posts: 887
    Bobbinogs wrote:
    craigus89 wrote:
    Stretch out before you ride for 5 - 10 mins next time.

    When I was starting late last year I had aches and pains all over for the first few weeks, neck, back, shoulders... they did go though.

    err, I would urge caution before embarking on pre-activity stretching. There are some stretches you should only really attempt after exercise and most other stretches will need the person to be warmed up with the correct dynamic routine.

    It might be worth a visit to a Sports physio who can help diagnose the problem and help with the right pre/post activity routine. A good physio will charge for the session but it will be less than the price of a carbon bottle cage, with more benefits.

    If you can't stretch out without hurting yourself, I would question how you have survived generaly life so long. It isn't difficult.

    And a physio is a bit extreme after only one ride.
Sign In or Register to comment.