Buying a lower tier bike and replacing parts over time

Hi, looking to get people's thoughts on this. Example being giant propel advanced 1, like the colour more, replace wheels straight away and then other parts over time. Original weight is quite heavy but will gradually get it down.

Comments

  • First.Aspect
    First.Aspect Posts: 15,300

    It'll end up more expensive overall.

  • daniel_b
    daniel_b Posts: 11,662
    edited June 7

    I've done similar to this, as for me the colour is a key part of why I own and ride a bike.


    If it's not a colour scheme I like (With the exception of it being a utility bike), I either won't ride it, or I'll have to pay a fortune to get it repainted.


    My approach was to buy the bike and as it was coming into winter, basically chuck a sheet over it and forget about it - in the interim I ordered a set of handbuilt wheels from Spokesman, and ordered a replacement groupset and integrated bars on the C2W scheme.

    Then I paid my lbs to remove the original groupset, and fit the new one, plus wheels and bars - I am fairly mechanically competent having built up two bikes in the past from frame and parts, but critically those were rim brake and had external cabling, where as this had hydraulics and a pretty complex setup at the front end to fully integrate all of the cables.

    I'd asked them to remove the 'new' original parts, and put them in the boxes from the new groupset, and I then sold it on ebay I think it was, or possibly fb marketplace, I forget now.


    Economically I suspect your approach probably makes more sense though, especially if you know you are going to cover a decent amount of miles on it, and wear them out sooner - with my bike, it's my 'best' bike and I know the mileage is not going to be that great, so it would have taken me some time to start wearing ultegra bits out, to the point where they needed replacing.

    Felt F70 05 (Turbo)
    Marin Palisades Trail 91 and 06
    Scott CR1 SL 12
    Cannondale Synapse Adventure 15 & 16 Di2
    Scott Foil 18
  • ugo.santalucia
    ugo.santalucia Posts: 28,301

    not necessarily.

    Parts can be bought when on sale and some upgrades can be purchased from China.

    I tend to buy a bike for the frame, typically because I can buy it with CTW and save 40% whereas I cannot buy a frame that way. The parts it comes with are typically sxite regardless of the level and they re never quire the ones that I want.

    left the forum March 2023
  • daniel_b
    daniel_b Posts: 11,662

    Mine worked out cheaper than the off the shelf version from the manufacturer, and it was lighter.

    The other bonus with it, is if you hand pick all the parts and finishing bits you REALLY want, you end up with a unique bike, that's hopefully as close to your perfect machine as you can get.

    Felt F70 05 (Turbo)
    Marin Palisades Trail 91 and 06
    Scott CR1 SL 12
    Cannondale Synapse Adventure 15 & 16 Di2
    Scott Foil 18
  • super_davo
    super_davo Posts: 1,186

    Yeah it would work out more expensive if you paid full retail price on the upgrades and bought the second you were able to afford but in all probability you won't. You'll wait for deals or replace consumables with something better or simply when something looks shiny and interesting that may not have been around or affordable when you bought the bike.

    I say go for it.. it will be way more exciting than buying something "perfect" from the off and then having it age slowly.

  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 26,251

    I went the opposite way. A top frame with budget components which were replaced over time. Still using that frame 16 years later so justified imo.

    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • davebradswmb
    davebradswmb Posts: 480

    I have done much the same, though going down the secondhand route to start with. The original bike was 9 speed Campagnolo Veloce on a Bianchi aluminium frame. The wheels were upgraded (secondhand) and then the groupset to new 11 speed Chorus, the 9 speed parts being transferred to my commuter/winter bike. I went down the secondhand route again and bought an Orbea Orca cheap for the (damaged and repaired) carbon frame, sold off the virtually new Ultegra parts and transferred the groupset and wheels from the old bike. I needed a new stem to get the reach and drop right and I invested in a carbon seatpost because I wanted to. Finally I invested in a new Time Alpe D'Huez frame, swapped all the parts over and got rid of the Orbea frame. I now have exactly the bike that I want, to replace it with all new parts would cost me £4,500 but at no point have I had to put my hand in my pocket for more than the £1,000 apart from the frame. My commuter/winter bike has also benefitted from ebay upgrades, it has now got a full 9 speed Record groupset which must be 20 years old by now and still working sweetly.

  • photonic69
    photonic69 Posts: 2,586

    I bought a Giant Defy with Sora groupset. It was the very lowest base model. Ran it for a few years and really liked the bike so I treated it and me to a 105 groupset, new bars, seat post and saddle and wheels all of which I bought for bargain prices in sales over a 6 month period. It's now my best bike but hardly ride it! Mostly cos the saddle is shite and hurts my arse. (upgraded saddle was a nice Pro-Logo but it developed a nasty creak after 13 months so I chucked a cheapo on it)


    Sometimes. Maybe. Possibly.

  • First.Aspect
    First.Aspect Posts: 15,300

    This. Kind of.

    Got a Cervelo disc off eBay, and an unridden Cannondale 6-13, both of which have received upgrades as stuff wore out.

    Now I've realised that peak bike was a while ago and everything since has been about aero and electronics, the hobby has got an awfully lot cheaper, because I can buy things from people who haven't figured that out yet.

  • MidlandsGrimpeur2
    MidlandsGrimpeur2 Posts: 1,538

    The only caveat I would highlight is that the whilst you are replacing with newer stuff, the frame will still get worn. I have had bikes where it gets to a point the frame is so battered there is no point chucking nice upgrades on it. You end up sticking cheaper and heavier stuff on it and kind of end up back at square one!

    Although, if you are fairly low mileage and the frame stays in good condition, this is far less of an issue.

  • First.Aspect
    First.Aspect Posts: 15,300

    Can someone tell me what wears out on a carbon or a titanium frame? The paint?

  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 26,251
    edited June 10

    I'm curious too. In the absence of serious crashes quality steel lasts decades. Mine lasted 15 years before a respray and even at that someone pre-spray thought it looked brand new from normal viewing distance.

    Summary - Buy the frame you want and fit it with the best you can afford. Even if cheap it can be upgraded later.

    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • MidlandsGrimpeur2
    MidlandsGrimpeur2 Posts: 1,538

    Yes, paint, lacquer, scuff marks and chips (I have worn through the lacquer to the carbon on some bikes). When you ride 20,000km a year you will find that fairly soon bikes just look pretty knackered. When this happens, the cost of having a bike resprayed and pretty much rebuilt doesn't really seem cost effective so I tend to replace the whole bike.

  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 26,251

    I guess it depends on how you care for a bike. 14 years old, @ 70k kms, pre-respray.


    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • MidlandsGrimpeur2
    MidlandsGrimpeur2 Posts: 1,538

    70,000km? Come off it PB, you've barely ridden 7000km on that, it looks brand new 😉

  • davebradswmb
    davebradswmb Posts: 480

    In not sure that stacks up. You'll usually be replacing components as they wear out so when you decide the frame has had it you may still have parts with many miles in them, in which case getting the frame resprayed is a lot cheaper than buying a bike. I would always strip down and rebuild my own bike, I don't trust anyone else with it so that's a cost only in time, and it's likely to be in the order of 8 hours work in total. It also assumes that you're happy with an off-the-peg build.

  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 26,251

    As I said, "from a normal viewing distance". 😉

    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • MidlandsGrimpeur2
    MidlandsGrimpeur2 Posts: 1,538

    You are right, it is a bit of a judgment call, and you can end up with perfectly viable bits on the bike, depending on wear rates and when you decide to call it a day with a particular bike. For example, my last winter bike was a Caad12. Purchased it in 2019 with sram force mechanical and a red quarq pm. As the force parts wore out I replaced them with some blingy red 22 bits. After winter of 2022/23 the crankset was pretty beat up, Brake calipers were knackered, the FD was bent due to a dropped chain getting stuck and the right shifter was completely broken. The frame itself was pretty marked up and had a few little dings here and there from minor crashes. I decided there was a bit of life left in it so I stuck some 105 shifters, FD and calipers on there. Used it for a few more months but by that time the chain rings needed replacing, rear wheel brake track had worn through and various other bits were shot (BB, Seized seatpost). I decided at that point to replace the whole bike, there was life left in some of the components and the frame is still viable, but it just made no sense to keep chucking money at it.

    As I said above, the biggest factor will be how much you ride and what conditions you ride in. 15 hours a week for 50 weeks of the year in all conditions pretty quickly wears components out and will leave bike frames looking pretty tired within 2 or 3 years (and components regularly being replaced), regardless of how well they are maintained.

    I suspect though that this is probably not a major concern for the OP!

  • Richktm
    Richktm Posts: 2

    Thanks for all the replies. It will be mostly ridden late spring to early autumn and then put away. So it should last longer.

  • Munsford0
    Munsford0 Posts: 632

    Which this year looks like being about a fortnight...

  • pmannion9
    pmannion9 Posts: 283

    What did you replace the CAAD with out of interest for a winter bike? I want a pretty light bike that i will leave mudguards on all year but not sure where to look ..

  • MidlandsGrimpeur2
    MidlandsGrimpeur2 Posts: 1,538

    Scott Addict 20. Very impressed with it, weighs just over 8kg in a size XS for me. Comes kitted out with full 105 di2 for about £2800 at full retail. You can fit mudguards too.

  • pmannion9
    pmannion9 Posts: 283

    Lovely looking bike - will check out the mudguard and tyre width compatibility - thanks