Smart Meter? Yay or Nay?

British Gas keep hassling me to fit a Smart Meter. I regularly read it myself and update the account.

Should I go ahead or keep with the Old-Skool meters? Both Gas and Leccy?


Sometimes. Maybe. Possibly.

Comments

  • mully79
    mully79 Posts: 904
    I’m not sure what you get out of it.
    British Gas did a horrendous job of fitting my smart meter in the last house. It told me nothing I didn’t know before and saved zero money.

    Added smart meter functionality means a supplier can cut off your gas/electricity without gaining access to your property.

    Suppliers will have to pay a fine if they don’t install enough smart meters hence the pressure.

    However, If it allows access to a tariff that’s unavailable without a smart meter which would save you a lot of money then it’s worth considering.
  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 41,471
    I hate the way they try to pass them off as 'saving you money'. Unless you are leaving things on unnecessarily I don't see how they do. It is far more about making life easier for the company which is why they keep pushing you to get one installed. It takes about 5 minutes a month to take a meter reading and upload it to the supplier.
  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 26,251
    mully79 said:

    I’m not sure what you get out of it.
    British Gas did a horrendous job of fitting my smart meter in the last house. It told me nothing I didn’t know before and saved zero money.

    Added smart meter functionality means a supplier can cut off your gas/electricity without gaining access to your property.

    Suppliers will have to pay a fine if they don’t install enough smart meters hence the pressure.

    However, If it allows access to a tariff that’s unavailable without a smart meter which would save you a lot of money then it’s worth considering.

    This is the only reason to get one. My gas one packed in years ago and apart from 5 minutes a month to give a reading I have lost nothing. Saved money on meter electricity. 🤣
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • briantrumpet
    briantrumpet Posts: 18,588
    I got one for the 'lectric, and that's quite interesting to see daily usage (and it did persuade me to change the timer on a heater), but gas, no.
  • capt_slog
    capt_slog Posts: 3,958
    I've resisted because of the hidden nasties (and I thought they might condemn my fuse board!)

    The hidden nasties...

    They can cut you off remotely as mentioned above.
    Also they could charge you different rates for different times of the day. It's sure to come one day.

    I'm going to have to get one because that will be the only way that I can get day and night rate electric. At present the signal which switches from day to night rates comes down the mains cable (I think it's a radio signal). They are going to discontinue this system next year, and it will be the smart meter that then makes the change over.


    The older I get, the better I was.

  • rjsterry
    rjsterry Posts: 28,226
    edited August 2023
    capt_slog said:

    I've resisted because of the hidden nasties (and I thought they might condemn my fuse board!)

    The hidden nasties...

    They can cut you off remotely as mentioned above.
    Also they could charge you different rates for different times of the day. It's sure to come one day.

    I'm going to have to get one because that will be the only way that I can get day and night rate electric. At present the signal which switches from day to night rates comes down the mains cable (I think it's a radio signal). They are going to discontinue this system next year, and it will be the smart meter that then makes the change over.

    Economy 7 has been around since at least my childhood. Better rates for times of low demand is a good thing.

    As BT says, daily and weekly use data throws up some interesting insights. You can also start calculating what savings you can realistically make with, say, better insulation, using your own data.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Part of the anti-growth coalition
  • photonic69
    photonic69 Posts: 2,586
    I think I'll stick at the moment. I think any savings I could possibly eek out of it would be more than offset by redecorating the mess that the bodgit installers would create.
    Home is already insulated as much as realistically possible with new widows and doors, underfloor and loft insulation, new boiler etc.


    Sometimes. Maybe. Possibly.

  • capt_slog
    capt_slog Posts: 3,958
    rjsterry said:

    capt_slog said:

    I've resisted because of the hidden nasties (and I thought they might condemn my fuse board!)

    The hidden nasties...

    They can cut you off remotely as mentioned above.
    Also they could charge you different rates for different times of the day. It's sure to come one day.

    I'm going to have to get one because that will be the only way that I can get day and night rate electric. At present the signal which switches from day to night rates comes down the mains cable (I think it's a radio signal). They are going to discontinue this system next year, and it will be the smart meter that then makes the change over.

    Economy 7 has been around since at least my childhood. Better rates for times of low demand is a good thing.

    As BT says, daily and weekly use data throws up some interesting insights. You can also start calculating what savings you can realistically make with, say, better insulation, using your own data.
    It certainly been around since mine ( I can still remember the advert!) and we had it then. My dad invested in storage heaters and cursed the buggers ever after. He somehow thought they stored electricity, and you could use that the next day to heat your home. Ah well. Of course if it wasn't cold the next day, you had all that excess heat to get rid of.

    I've had economy 7 for years too, and it is its continued use that will force the smart meter into Chez Slog.

    BTW, although I've moved a couple of times, I'm now in the same house where I was born, and in the same bedroom. :)



    The older I get, the better I was.

  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 26,251
    capt_slog said:


    ...
    BTW, although I've moved a couple of times, I'm now in the same house where I was born, and in the same bedroom. :)

    That's weird imo. If I moved back to my childhood home I'd be in my parents room.
    Don't the parents always get the best room?
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • rjsterry
    rjsterry Posts: 28,226
    capt_slog said:

    rjsterry said:

    capt_slog said:

    I've resisted because of the hidden nasties (and I thought they might condemn my fuse board!)

    The hidden nasties...

    They can cut you off remotely as mentioned above.
    Also they could charge you different rates for different times of the day. It's sure to come one day.

    I'm going to have to get one because that will be the only way that I can get day and night rate electric. At present the signal which switches from day to night rates comes down the mains cable (I think it's a radio signal). They are going to discontinue this system next year, and it will be the smart meter that then makes the change over.

    Economy 7 has been around since at least my childhood. Better rates for times of low demand is a good thing.

    As BT says, daily and weekly use data throws up some interesting insights. You can also start calculating what savings you can realistically make with, say, better insulation, using your own data.
    It certainly been around since mine ( I can still remember the advert!) and we had it then. My dad invested in storage heaters and cursed the buggers ever after. He somehow thought they stored electricity, and you could use that the next day to heat your home. Ah well. Of course if it wasn't cold the next day, you had all that excess heat to get rid of.

    I've had economy 7 for years too, and it is its continued use that will force the smart meter into Chez Slog.

    BTW, although I've moved a couple of times, I'm now in the same house where I was born, and in the same bedroom. :)

    Ah storage heaters... (shudder)
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Part of the anti-growth coalition
  • capt_slog
    capt_slog Posts: 3,958
    pblakeney said:

    capt_slog said:


    ...
    BTW, although I've moved a couple of times, I'm now in the same house where I was born, and in the same bedroom. :)

    That's weird imo. If I moved back to my childhood home I'd be in my parents room.
    Don't the parents always get the best room?
    This is an imperfect medium :smiley:

    I meant "the same room I was born in", not the bedroom I had as a youngster.


    The older I get, the better I was.

  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 26,251
    capt_slog said:

    pblakeney said:

    capt_slog said:


    ...
    BTW, although I've moved a couple of times, I'm now in the same house where I was born, and in the same bedroom. :)

    That's weird imo. If I moved back to my childhood home I'd be in my parents room.
    Don't the parents always get the best room?
    This is an imperfect medium :smiley:

    I meant "the same room I was born in", not the bedroom I had as a youngster.
    :D:):D
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • Wheelspinner
    Wheelspinner Posts: 6,595

    I think I'll stick at the moment. I think any savings I could possibly eek out of it would be more than offset by redecorating the mess that the bodgit installers would create.
    Home is already insulated as much as realistically possible with new widows and doors, underfloor and loft insulation, new boiler etc.



    Is there something special about the insulating properties of new ones?
    Open One+ BMC TE29 Seven 622SL On One Scandal Cervelo RS
  • On a sunny day with my solar panels enjoying their best life, my analogue meter actually goes into reverse. An electrician told me a few years ago to avoid getting a smart meter for as long as possible since they won't go backwards. I wonder if this was an anomaly of the first generation or a feature of all smart meters?

    Obviously, I'm not keen to ask my supplier; I already spend enough of my time fending off requests to have a smart meter fitted.
    ================================
    Cake is just weakness entering the body
  • rjsterry
    rjsterry Posts: 28,226

    On a sunny day with my solar panels enjoying their best life, my analogue meter actually goes into reverse. An electrician told me a few years ago to avoid getting a smart meter for as long as possible since they won't go backwards. I wonder if this was an anomaly of the first generation or a feature of all smart meters?

    Obviously, I'm not keen to ask my supplier; I already spend enough of my time fending off requests to have a smart meter fitted.

    There are feed in tariffs and other special arrangements for small generators. You won't earn the same per kWh as you pay (which is what I think your reversing meter is effectively doing) but I have a feeling you may not be abiding by the terms of your supply agreement if you are feeding in to the grid unofficially. Might be worth checking.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Part of the anti-growth coalition
  • capt_slog
    capt_slog Posts: 3,958
    rjsterry said:

    On a sunny day with my solar panels enjoying their best life, my analogue meter actually goes into reverse. An electrician told me a few years ago to avoid getting a smart meter for as long as possible since they won't go backwards. I wonder if this was an anomaly of the first generation or a feature of all smart meters?

    Obviously, I'm not keen to ask my supplier; I already spend enough of my time fending off requests to have a smart meter fitted.

    There are feed in tariffs and other special arrangements for small generators. You won't earn the same per kWh as you pay (which is what I think your reversing meter is effectively doing) but I have a feeling you may not be abiding by the terms of your supply agreement if you are feeding in to the grid unofficially. Might be worth checking.
    Yup. That doesn't sound right at all.



    The older I get, the better I was.

  • TheBigBean
    TheBigBean Posts: 20,943

    On a sunny day with my solar panels enjoying their best life, my analogue meter actually goes into reverse. An electrician told me a few years ago to avoid getting a smart meter for as long as possible since they won't go backwards. I wonder if this was an anomaly of the first generation or a feature of all smart meters?

    Obviously, I'm not keen to ask my supplier; I already spend enough of my time fending off requests to have a smart meter fitted.

    Do you still get the deemed export payments as well (50% of the solar generated)?

    You can get a meter with a backstop which is not smart, but doesn't go backwards. If you get a smart meter you won't receive the 50% deemed export, but instead will receive the actual amount you export. I think in many cases this will be less.
  • photonic69
    photonic69 Posts: 2,586

    I think I'll stick at the moment. I think any savings I could possibly eek out of it would be more than offset by redecorating the mess that the bodgit installers would create.
    Home is already insulated as much as realistically possible with new widows and doors, underfloor and loft insulation, new boiler etc.



    Is there something special about the insulating properties of new ones?
    Yup. For a start they are better than the single glazed, aluminium framed, draughty ones they replaced!!!


    Sometimes. Maybe. Possibly.

  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 41,471

    I think I'll stick at the moment. I think any savings I could possibly eek out of it would be more than offset by redecorating the mess that the bodgit installers would create.
    Home is already insulated as much as realistically possible with new widows and doors, underfloor and loft insulation, new boiler etc.



    Is there something special about the insulating properties of new ones?
    Yup. For a start they are better than the single glazed, aluminium framed, draughty ones they replaced!!!
    I think you need to look again at the bit highlighted in his quote!
  • photonic69
    photonic69 Posts: 2,586
    Pross said:

    I think I'll stick at the moment. I think any savings I could possibly eek out of it would be more than offset by redecorating the mess that the bodgit installers would create.
    Home is already insulated as much as realistically possible with new widows and doors, underfloor and loft insulation, new boiler etc.



    Is there something special about the insulating properties of new ones?
    Yup. For a start they are better than the single glazed, aluminium framed, draughty ones they replaced!!!
    I think you need to look again at the bit highlighted in his quote!
    Haha! Yes. They are cost effective, gagging for it and usually come with a hefty life insurance payout pot as a bonus!


    Sometimes. Maybe. Possibly.

  • lesfirth
    lesfirth Posts: 1,382
    oxoman said:

    The new smart meters know when electricity is imported via solar, turbine etc.

    I am a qualified electrical engineer and I could not see how your smart meter could do this. After some googling I am still unable to verify the accuracy of this statement.
    Perhaps the OP can enlighten me.

  • lesfirth
    lesfirth Posts: 1,382
    oxoman said:

    Snap. Qualified Spark here. If you go through the settings on Some smart meters you will find your normal usage data and tariff rates but you will also find an import reading for solar panels etc. How accurate it is I know not but it is an option. They have to be able to record the imported somehow. They don't fit extra meters just to read whatever is generated through the solar panels and inverters.
    A quick Google tells you that the newer meters are Bi Directional meters read power consumed and fed back into the grid. The one thing I don't like about smart meters is they have built in a remote disconnection facility should you owe them to much.

    Apologies. I thought you were suggesting that the smart meter could tell where the electricity being supplied from the grid had come from!