Starter basic repair kit

Morning all, a colleague of mine has just confessed that a) she doesn't know how to fix the aftermath of a fairy visit, and b) she doesn't have the kit to do it :o
Any recommendations for a basic starter kit? Would need (say) tyre levers, scabs/etc, multi-tool.

It's just a hill. Get over it.

Comments

  • Munsford0
    Munsford0 Posts: 632
    At a minimum all you need out on the road are tyre levers, a replacement tube and a pump. And know how to use them. Incl checking the tyre for the cause of the puncture and being able to get the tyre back on without pinching the tube. Then hope you don't get a second puncture.

    Fixing punctured tubes back home just need patches and glue
  • singleton
    singleton Posts: 2,523
    edited June 2023
    As above, roadside repair would be to simply replace the tube and worry about fixing it later.
    Only addition to the above kit is an Allen key of the necessary size if the bike has through-axles.
  • kingstongraham
    kingstongraham Posts: 26,800
    edited June 2023
    Munsford0 said:

    At a minimum all you need out on the road are tyre levers, a replacement tube and a pump. And know how to use them. Incl checking the tyre for the cause of the puncture and being able to get the tyre back on without pinching the tube. Then hope you don't get a second puncture.

    Fixing punctured tubes back home just need patches and glue

    This is all I make sure I definitely carry on the commute. The highlighted is important - in my experience when you get a second puncture and then have to nurse it home inflating every five minutes in the rain it's a bit annoying.
  • N0bodyOfTheGoat
    N0bodyOfTheGoat Posts: 5,900
    Weldtite used to do a puncture repair kit that came with decent mini levers, ah here go https://www.chainreactioncycles.com/p/weldtite-puncture-repair-kit-and-tyre-levers
    ================
    2020 Voodoo Marasa
    2017 Cube Attain GTC Pro Disc 2016
    2016 Voodoo Wazoo
  • I would add a pack of instant patches, just in case of a 2nd puncture
  • sungod
    sungod Posts: 16,751
    yeah that weldtite kit looks fine, otherwise get a rema kit, same principle, extremely reliable https://www.tweekscycles.com/rema-tip-top-tt02-touring-puncture-repair-kit-madpo08/

    even if not used on the road, it can be used at home, proper patches stay put forever

    and whatever pump, one with a foolproof chuck :)

    i'd keep it simple to start, other tools need the knowledge to use

    while i have a multitool in the saddle bag on my commute bike, i don't recall ever needing it out on the road, worst case a good samaritan is likely to stop and help if something were really needed
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • Munsford0
    Munsford0 Posts: 632
    Rema is my go to patch / glue kit. But whatever the brand, once the seal on the glue is broken, you should aim to use it within a few weeks. I save up punctured tubes to fix them in batches for that reason.
    Lost count of the number of times I've gone to use a previously opened tube only to find it's set solid. The patches I carry with me on the road* always have a new, unopened tube of glue with them.

    (* I like to know I could still sort out multiple punctures...)
  • photonic69
    photonic69 Posts: 2,572
    You didn't say if she was a commuter or a leisure cyclist. If we go with the former I'd suggest she pops on some Schwalbe Marathon Plus tyres for a start. If it's more leisure then maybe Conti Four Seasons?

    I'd go with this kit:
    Tyres: https://wiggle.com/p/schwalbe-marathon-plus-road-tyre-smart-guard?color=black

    Tyre Levers: https://wiggle.com/p/park-tool-tyre-lever-set-tl-1-2

    Inner Tubes: https://wiggle.com/p/lifeline-road-inner-tube

    Pump: https://wiggle.com/p/topeak-mini-morph-pump

    CO2 Head: https://wiggle.com/p/lifeline-cnc-co2-inflator-thread-on-valve-head

    CO2 Bottles: https://wiggle.com/p/lifeline-co2-tyre-inflator-cartridge

    Puncture Repair: https://wiggle.com/p/park-tool-vulcanising-patch-kit-vp-1

    Instant Patches: https://wiggle.com/p/park-tool-puncture-repair-kit-super-patch-gp-2

    Multi Tool: https://wiggle.com/p/lifeline-essential-10-in-1-folding-multi-tool

    These will fit into a tool bottle except the pump: https://wiggle.com/p/lifeline-tool-storage-bottle

    I'd also suggest some Fenwicks Chain Lube. I'm surprised at the number of bikes i see with rusty chains being ridden. This lube works well, isn't too messy and lasts a long time: https://amazon.co.uk/Fenwicks-CHAIN-LUBE-100ML/dp/B06Y12L6RS

    Maybe also get her to practice changing an inner tube during a lunch hour. Show her how it's done then get her to do it at least two times without any interference.


    Sometimes. Maybe. Possibly.

  • photonic69
    photonic69 Posts: 2,572
    Munsford0 said:

    Rema is my go to patch / glue kit. But whatever the brand, once the seal on the glue is broken, you should aim to use it within a few weeks. I save up punctured tubes to fix them in batches for that reason.
    Lost count of the number of times I've gone to use a previously opened tube only to find it's set solid. The patches I carry with me on the road* always have a new, unopened tube of glue with them.

    (* I like to know I could still sort out multiple punctures...)

    Yeah, it's such a pain when the glue dries out and such a waste too. The tubes are too big for the tiny amount needed and I've never finished one before it dries completely.
    Anyone know of a supplier of small (5ml) bulk tubes of glue/vulcanising solution?


    Sometimes. Maybe. Possibly.

  • sungod
    sungod Posts: 16,751
    if you search on google for 'rema vulcanizing fluid you'll find it, both the small tubes and larger sizes

    you can also get packs of patches

    i use the larger tube and the patches for when i repair tubuar tyres
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • secretsam
    secretsam Posts: 5,105
    Brilliant stuff, thanks all

    It's just a hill. Get over it.
  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 26,205

    Munsford0 said:

    Rema is my go to patch / glue kit. But whatever the brand, once the seal on the glue is broken, you should aim to use it within a few weeks. I save up punctured tubes to fix them in batches for that reason.
    Lost count of the number of times I've gone to use a previously opened tube only to find it's set solid. The patches I carry with me on the road* always have a new, unopened tube of glue with them.

    (* I like to know I could still sort out multiple punctures...)

    Yeah, it's such a pain when the glue dries out and such a waste too. The tubes are too big for the tiny amount needed and I've never finished one before it dries completely.
    Anyone know of a supplier of small (5ml) bulk tubes of glue/vulcanising solution?
    I simply did a search on Amazon.
    Not only did I find some that work but they don't seem to harden. Win-win-win.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • photonic69
    photonic69 Posts: 2,572
    pblakeney said:



    Yeah, it's such a pain when the glue dries out and such a waste too. The tubes are too big for the tiny amount needed and I've never finished one before it dries completely.
    Anyone know of a supplier of small (5ml) bulk tubes of glue/vulcanising solution?

    I simply did a search on Amazon.
    Not only did I find some that work but they don't seem to harden. Win-win-win.
    Cool. Care to share?


    Sometimes. Maybe. Possibly.

  • pangolin
    pangolin Posts: 6,422
    I'm amazed so many of you think rubber patches and tubes of vulcanising fluid are a good idea for a newbie.

    I'd get this https://www.tredz.co.uk/.Park-Tool-TR1C-Tyre-Tube-Repair-Kit_11334.htm along with a pump and a spare tube.

    1st puncture, just stick the new tube in. 2nd, use the instant patches.

    Make her practice changing it with you there first and demonstrate how to check for thorns, glass etc in the tyre before you put it back on.
    - Genesis Croix de Fer
    - Dolan Tuono
  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 26,205

    pblakeney said:



    Yeah, it's such a pain when the glue dries out and such a waste too. The tubes are too big for the tiny amount needed and I've never finished one before it dries completely.
    Anyone know of a supplier of small (5ml) bulk tubes of glue/vulcanising solution?

    I simply did a search on Amazon.
    Not only did I find some that work but they don't seem to harden. Win-win-win.
    Cool. Care to share?

    Turns out they are 15ml, doh! Anyway no issue as they haven't hardened and are cheap.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/PUNCTURE-REPAIR-RUBBER-SOLUTION-LARGE/dp/B074QH8C3X/ref=sr_1_31?crid=17L6CUR6HBO97&keywords=bicycle+tyre+glue+rubber+repair&qid=1687349909&sprefix=bicycle+tyre+glue+rubber+repair,aps,71&sr=8-31
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 26,205
    pangolin said:

    I'm amazed so many of you think rubber patches and tubes of vulcanising fluid are a good idea for a newbie.

    ...

    I never do that on the road, back in the comfort of my home only.
    Spare tube and self adhesive patches on the road.

    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • secretsam
    secretsam Posts: 5,105
    pangolin said:

    I'm amazed so many of you think rubber patches and tubes of vulcanising fluid are a good idea for a newbie.

    Personally, I've not been impressed with Skabs, etc - they simply aren't as good as a 'proper' patch. I'd always advise a tube swap, followed by a proper fix at home.
    pangolin said:

    Make her practice changing it with you there first and demonstrate how to check for thorns, glass etc in the tyre before you put it back on.

    But teach her not to just run her fingers along the inside of the tyre, in case she finds that shard of glass that caused the issue #VoiceOfExperience :#

    It's just a hill. Get over it.
  • sungod
    sungod Posts: 16,751
    pangolin said:

    I'm amazed so many of you think rubber patches and tubes of vulcanising fluid are a good idea for a newbie.

    I'd get this https://www.tredz.co.uk/.Park-Tool-TR1C-Tyre-Tube-Repair-Kit_11334.htm along with a pump and a spare tube.

    1st puncture, just stick the new tube in. 2nd, use the instant patches.

    Make her practice changing it with you there first and demonstrate how to check for thorns, glass etc in the tyre before you put it back on.

    people from all walks of life have managed using patches and vulcanising fluid for decades, it's less complicated than making toast, buttering it and applying marmalade

    i once tried the park patches, they're aren't reliable, rema patches are far superior
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • pangolin
    pangolin Posts: 6,422
    sungod said:

    pangolin said:

    I'm amazed so many of you think rubber patches and tubes of vulcanising fluid are a good idea for a newbie.

    I'd get this https://www.tredz.co.uk/.Park-Tool-TR1C-Tyre-Tube-Repair-Kit_11334.htm along with a pump and a spare tube.

    1st puncture, just stick the new tube in. 2nd, use the instant patches.

    Make her practice changing it with you there first and demonstrate how to check for thorns, glass etc in the tyre before you put it back on.

    people from all walks of life have managed using patches and vulcanising fluid for decades, it's less complicated than making toast, buttering it and applying marmalade

    i once tried the park patches, they're aren't reliable, rema patches are far superior
    I've been through a dozen or so over the years, not had an issue. YMMV.
    - Genesis Croix de Fer
    - Dolan Tuono
  • kingstongraham
    kingstongraham Posts: 26,800
    New tube each time.
  • pep.fermi
    pep.fermi Posts: 369
    edited June 2023
    I used tubes years after first opening.
    As for "patches" I simply make my own from some old tube lying around in the garage. I'm 49, so been doing this for the last maybe 40yr. Never a problem.

  • secretsam
    secretsam Posts: 5,105
    edited June 2023
    pep.fermi said:

    I used tubes years after first opening.
    As for "patches" I simply make my own from some old tube lying around in the garage. I'm 49, so been doing this for the last maybe 40yr. Never a problem.

    I might try that, the waste involved in replacing tubes is appalling.

    And I just don't rate self-adhesive patches.

    New tube each time.

    I consider that unnecessarily wasteful - I'll pop in a fresh tube, then repair the p**ctured one once back at the ranch.

    It's just a hill. Get over it.
  • pep.fermi
    pep.fermi Posts: 369

    New tube each time.

    But why?

    Repairing a tube adds maybe 1-2min to the total time needed. And it's fun. And I don't think a patched tube has higher chance to fail than a brand new one.
  • kingstongraham
    kingstongraham Posts: 26,800
    pep.fermi said:

    New tube each time.

    But why?

    Repairing a tube adds maybe 1-2min to the total time needed. And it's fun. And I don't think a patched tube has higher chance to fail than a brand new one.
    It really doesn't happen that often. And fair play to you if that's something you enjoy, but it's not a hobby of mine.
  • bobones
    bobones Posts: 1,215
    Tubeless tyres, Orange Seal, Dynaplugs then forget about removing wheels and tyres at the side of the road.
  • lesfirth
    lesfirth Posts: 1,382
    pep.fermi said:

    New tube each time.

    But why?

    Repairing a tube adds maybe 1-2min to the total time needed. And it's fun. And I don't think a patched tube has higher chance to fail than a brand new one.
    It is not fun when the rain is dripping off your helmet and your fingers are that cold that they dont work anymore. This is when the self adhesive patches that worked at home dont work when you are trying to shelter behind a dry stone wall and you are wondering how long it takes to die from hypothermia.
    That was before I went tubeless. If you dont like that route carry TWO tubes.
  • lesfirth
    lesfirth Posts: 1,382
    The best bit of kit for a beginner is a decent track pump with a gauge. The correct tyre pressures will prevent pinch punctures.
  • froze
    froze Posts: 205
    I haven't read all of the posts so this stuff I'm sure has been covered.

    First off, I'm going to assume she doesn't know how to wrench on a bike, if that's true, then there is no need to buy a multi-tool. If the bike is in good shape, she will rarely have to use a multi-tool anyways, I've been riding for over 45 years and I can count on one hand how many times I had to use it on one of my bikes, heck I used it a lot more to fix other people's bikes that broke on the side of the road or trail! As long as she keeps it maintained the likelihood of needing a tool is very rare.

    You will be given the task of teaching her how to fix a flat, I would start by deflating the rear tire, show her how to get the wheel off, get the bead off the rim, take the tube out and put the tube back in and put the bead on, pump up the tire, put it back on the bike. do this while she watches. Then deflate the tire and repeat except this time she's going to do it while you watch closely, she should do this at least 12 times to get the jest of things.

    The tools she should buy, if these are available where you live, is a set of Lezyne Power XL tire levers, these things are indestructible, and the XL means they are a bit longer than the normal Power levers which will help her with greater leverage.

    Next is a good pump, Lezyne makes the best mini pumps on the market currently. If she has a road bike with high-pressure tires of over 60 psi, I would advise getting the Road Drive large size, the large size makes pumping easier, but it only works for Presta valves, it can be used with Schrader valves but you would have to buy a Cantitoe Road Schrader to Presta Valve Adapter, this screws onto a Schrader valve then you can put the Lezyne pump on the end and pump like a presta valve tube. This pump does not come with a gauge; they make one that does but it's a shorter pump making it more difficult to put air into a tire. So she will need a gauge, price wise, weight, and accuracy I like the Zefal Twin Bicycle Tire Gauge, this gauge works on both Schrader and Presta valves

    If she has a mountain bike that uses no more than 50 psi in the tires and the tires are larger than road tires, she needs a high-volume pump, Lezyne Gauge Drive HP, comes only in a medium size, but it's a good length for easier pumping.

    She will need a patch kit, the most widely used patch kit is made by Rema Tip Top 02 (known as TT02), they are widely used for many years because they work.

    I disagree with CO2, you have to buy the air each time you use it, plus it bleeds out of the tube overnight, so when you get home, you'll have to deflate the tube and reinflate it with regular air, a waste of time, I hate doing things twice! You also have to discard the carts, but most importantly, you can only carry so much air, if you run out of carts you're screwed. Get your air for free by using a pump.

    I also disagree with stick-on patches, those won't stick for more than maybe 3 days, some brands less, then the tire goes flat, now you're going to have to peel that patch off and put on a real patch, again, I hate doing things twice.

    I always patch first on the road before resorting to putting in a tube, and I'm going to teach you a trick that will make patching FASTER than installing a tube, not only that but when you go home you won't have a tube to repair! This is a trick I learned when I was 8 years old and an old retired neighbor came over to show me how to fix flats, and taught me this trick, I'm now 70 years old so I've been doing this all those years. This method doesn't require you to remove the wheel from the bike! What you do is find the puncture entrance in the tread or sidewall, once you locate that pull out anything stuck in it, then simply rotate the wheel to get clear of the frame, and unbead about 1/2 of one side of the tire with the hole in the center of that half; next pull out about a 1/4 of the tube with the hole in the center of that; next simply patch the tube like you would normally, reinstall tube and tire, and boom you're done! This method works roughly 90% of the time, for the other 10% you will have to remove the wheel, but as you can see roughly 90% of the time you will easily be done before someone else is done installing a new tube. Don't forget too, that installing a new tube will require that you spend some time tightly rolling up the bad tube to get it into your seat bag.

    I've had tubes with as many as 16 patches, this happened when I use to live in a region of the US that had goathead thorns, nasty little buggers. Realistically, if you don't live in an area with thorns, you might only get one flat the entire life of a tire, move that tube to a new tire and keep using it. If you put a dusting of talc on the tube before installing it, the talc will keep the tube from sticking to the tire, and the stuff helps to keep the rubber fresher longer. Wasting tubes just because of one flat is stupid.

    Teach your friend this method, but she needs to first learn how to get the rear wheel off and back on, so teach her that first, make sure she can do that adequately, then show her what I just told you about. She may want to slap you for not showing her that first, but in case she ever needs to remove the wheel she needs to know how.

    Tubeless tires are a good idea, I don't like them, but I'm old and I'm used to the tube system! The problem with tubeless is difficulty installing the tire on the rim, and you need a charger pump to get the bead to seat. While you do use sealant, that sealant doesn't last forever, maybe 3 to 6 months then you have to put more in. If she gets a hole too big for the sealant to handle then she will have to plug the tire, or put a tube in, but remember those tubeless tires are a pain to put on, and most women will struggle to the point of frustration trying doing that on the side of the road. The other problem is if her bike doesn't have tubeless-ready rims she's in for a major expense to convert to tubeless. Using tubeless or not is something you are going to have to decide on with her, but it is a consideration.

    If she decides at some point to learn how to do simple repairs then look into a multi-tool, but one step at a time.