Changing inner tube

_chris_
_chris_ Posts: 18
I have a flat front tyre and I have the new inner tube to go in, but how do I get the wheel off with the brakes there? (as you can see in the image).


Also, how do I adjust those brakes to rub quicker with just a small amount of play in the trigger please?

Comments

  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 26,462
    Pull the levers together at the top where the cable is, and the bent tube should be able to pull out from the silver part. This releases the brakes.
    Do the reverse to reassemble. Loosen the screw (top left) and pull a little cable through then tighten the screw. This will adjust the gap between pads and rim.
    There may be a fine tuning screwed part at the levers too.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • whyamihere
    whyamihere Posts: 7,708
    edited June 2023
    Park Tool have good videos showing everything you need to know for basic maintenance like this. Here's their V-brake video:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XMa9UqY9obk
  • _chris_
    _chris_ Posts: 18

    Park Tool have good videos showing everything you need to know for basic maintenance like this. Here's their V-brake video:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XMa9UqY9obk

    Thank you very much, out of the 7 detailed in the vid, which is mine please?

  • _chris_
    _chris_ Posts: 18
    pblakeney said:

    Pull the levers together at the top where the cable is, and the bent tube should be able to pull out from the silver part. This releases the brakes.
    Do the reverse to reassemble. Loosen the screw (top left) and pull a little cable through then tighten the screw. This will adjust the gap between pads and rim.
    There may be a fine tuning screwed part at the levers too.

    Thank you, I'm still learning about how to maintain my bike.
  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 26,462
    _chris_ said:

    pblakeney said:

    Pull the levers together at the top where the cable is, and the bent tube should be able to pull out from the silver part. This releases the brakes.
    Do the reverse to reassemble. Loosen the screw (top left) and pull a little cable through then tighten the screw. This will adjust the gap between pads and rim.
    There may be a fine tuning screwed part at the levers too.

    Thank you, I'm still learning about how to maintain my bike.
    #2 in the video above will help you much more than I can.
    Should be fairly obvious from the screenshots.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • _chris_
    _chris_ Posts: 18
    pblakeney said:

    _chris_ said:

    pblakeney said:

    Pull the levers together at the top where the cable is, and the bent tube should be able to pull out from the silver part. This releases the brakes.
    Do the reverse to reassemble. Loosen the screw (top left) and pull a little cable through then tighten the screw. This will adjust the gap between pads and rim.
    There may be a fine tuning screwed part at the levers too.

    Thank you, I'm still learning about how to maintain my bike.
    #2 in the video above will help you much more than I can.
    Should be fairly obvious from the screenshots.
    Thank you, the helps appreciated.
  • Mad_Malx
    Mad_Malx Posts: 5,093
    Can't see too clearly, but your brake blocks look quite worn too, so might be an idea to change these before adjusting the brake cable tension.
  • _chris_
    _chris_ Posts: 18
    Mad_Malx said:

    Can't see too clearly, but your brake blocks look quite worn too, so might be an idea to change these before adjusting the brake cable tension.

    Thanks, yeah, it would make sense to do them at the same time. I would like to order them online - is there a certain size / type to order?
  • Mad_Malx
    Mad_Malx Posts: 5,093
    I just buy some like my previous (length and type). More expensive ones like Koolstop do work better in wet /muddy conditions, but tend to wear faster. With the cable ajusted properly they all work pretty well and I usually go midrange.
    I think the ones you have are integrated shoe and pad, so you replace the post and nuts at the same time, but I really can't see.
  • _chris_
    _chris_ Posts: 18
    Okay, thank you, I'll look into that.
  • _chris_
    _chris_ Posts: 18
    I've taken a photo from another angle, does this help to identify the type please?
  • _chris_
    _chris_ Posts: 18


  • _chris_
    _chris_ Posts: 18
    Apologies for them coming out sideways - I did try to get them the right way up.
  • _chris_
    _chris_ Posts: 18
    Mission accomplished - thank you all.
  • _chris_
    _chris_ Posts: 18
    Just as an afterthought. In terms ONLY of maintenance, which types of brakes are best? My brakes you see in the image, or disc brakes?
  • pangolin
    pangolin Posts: 6,520
    _chris_ said:

    Just as an afterthought. In terms ONLY of maintenance, which types of brakes are best? My brakes you see in the image, or disc brakes?

    Bit of a can of worms there.

    I've had both and they are just different really. The ones you have are probably a bit easier in terms of being able to work things out intuitively just by looking at them and messing around.
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