Rural Living

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  • Living rural at least in some parts, is far more feasible than it used to be, with 4G/5G mobile home broadband and ~£50 every six months for food delivery from the likes of Tesco, not to mention Amazon as a backup for anything and everything.
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  • pinno
    pinno Posts: 51,331
    Semi detached - no.
    That road is too narrow for a laborious daily commute. Imagine getting stuck behind livestock being moved/logging vehicles/farm vehicles/camper vans/trees down in a storm etc etc
    There are some locations here that are 12-15 miles out of 'town' but are close to decent main roads and it's a only 20 minute drive or so.

    Find some place a bit closer to amenities (half decent supermarket) for a start.
    Village shops can be eye wateringly expensive. We live 1 mile from the village shop but rarely go there.

    If you need to get to an ageing relative without hassle, then this is not the place for you.
    I think the idea is good but the location isn't.
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • morstar
    morstar Posts: 6,190
    I guess it depends on how engaged you are with the outside world. If you're very settled at home for anything other than shopping, the long distance from 'amenities' isn't going to be an issue.

    However, that isn't the case. The wife is travelling daily and you know there is going to be a lot of family support to give in the near future.

    Coupled with the semi detached thing, I'd be putting it in the nice idea but not quite right folder.
  • First.Aspect
    First.Aspect Posts: 14,626
    Road looks fine, but depends how touristy it gets. I wonder how long before the plantations are clear cut though? Aside from turning patches of the landscape into a post apocalyptic movie set for 5 years, the works traffic can be messy and dangerous. Logging trucks aren't equipped with brakes.
  • wavefront
    wavefront Posts: 397
    morstar said:

    I guess it depends on how engaged you are with the outside world. If you're very settled at home for anything other than shopping, the long distance from 'amenities' isn't going to be an issue.

    However, that isn't the case. The wife is travelling daily and you know there is going to be a lot of family support to give in the near future.

    Coupled with the semi detached thing, I'd be putting it in the nice idea but not quite right folder.

    I’d tend to agree (I’d missed the part about family support) despite me waxing lyrical about our situation. One thing I’ll add about our move was that it was to actually be closer to family after the shock of my mum dying - my dad and brother are 25 mins now away and I see them every week or so rather than the once a year it used to be. Time with them was the sole reason for our move and everything else fell into place. But you can shape your plans to suit and include rural living.
  • briantrumpet
    briantrumpet Posts: 17,866
    I think the other thing to bear in mind is how quickly time flies as you get older... my perception is that since the start of my 50s, time has flown by, and if the past ten years are anything to go by, it's going to feel like no time and I'll be 70. I've no appetite for the upheaval of moving, so both of my houses (sorry) were bought thinking that either would still suit me in my 8th decade, if I make it that far, even if a mobility scooter has replaced the bikes to get to the shops.
  • Stevo_666
    Stevo_666 Posts: 58,482
    wavefront said:

    morstar said:

    I guess it depends on how engaged you are with the outside world. If you're very settled at home for anything other than shopping, the long distance from 'amenities' isn't going to be an issue.

    However, that isn't the case. The wife is travelling daily and you know there is going to be a lot of family support to give in the near future.

    Coupled with the semi detached thing, I'd be putting it in the nice idea but not quite right folder.

    I’d tend to agree (I’d missed the part about family support) despite me waxing lyrical about our situation. One thing I’ll add about our move was that it was to actually be closer to family after the shock of my mum dying - my dad and brother are 25 mins now away and I see them every week or so rather than the once a year it used to be. Time with them was the sole reason for our move and everything else fell into place. But you can shape your plans to suit and include rural living.
    Fair point about family matters - we didn't make the move out of town until both sets of parents were no longer around and our kid was at university. It made the choice of where where to go much broader and the move itself easier.
    "I spent most of my money on birds, booze and fast cars: the rest of it I just squandered." [George Best]
  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 25,750

    I think the other thing to bear in mind is how quickly time flies as you get older... my perception is that since the start of my 50s, time has flown by, and if the past ten years are anything to go by, it's going to feel like no time and I'll be 70. I've no appetite for the upheaval of moving, so both of my houses (sorry) were bought thinking that either would still suit me in my 8th decade, if I make it that far, even if a mobility scooter has replaced the bikes to get to the shops.

    Time is relative to perception. When you are 10 a year is 10% of your lifetime. When you are 50 a year is only 2%. 5 times faster.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • rick_chasey
    rick_chasey Posts: 72,615
    pblakeney said:

    I think the other thing to bear in mind is how quickly time flies as you get older... my perception is that since the start of my 50s, time has flown by, and if the past ten years are anything to go by, it's going to feel like no time and I'll be 70. I've no appetite for the upheaval of moving, so both of my houses (sorry) were bought thinking that either would still suit me in my 8th decade, if I make it that far, even if a mobility scooter has replaced the bikes to get to the shops.

    Time is relative to perception. When you are 10 a year is 10% of your lifetime. When you are 50 a year is only 2%. 5 times faster.
    When you’re 60 a year is probably 5% of your remaining life though.
  • briantrumpet
    briantrumpet Posts: 17,866

    pblakeney said:

    I think the other thing to bear in mind is how quickly time flies as you get older... my perception is that since the start of my 50s, time has flown by, and if the past ten years are anything to go by, it's going to feel like no time and I'll be 70. I've no appetite for the upheaval of moving, so both of my houses (sorry) were bought thinking that either would still suit me in my 8th decade, if I make it that far, even if a mobility scooter has replaced the bikes to get to the shops.

    Time is relative to perception. When you are 10 a year is 10% of your lifetime. When you are 50 a year is only 2%. 5 times faster.
    When you’re 60 a year is probably 5% of your remaining life though.
    And 10% of one's properly active life. But you can still FRO for reminding me! 😭
  • Dorset_Boy
    Dorset_Boy Posts: 6,919
    65 yo male has a 1 in 4 chance of hitting 100.
    In southern England average male life expectancy is c88, and a bit over 90 for a woman.
  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 40,490

    Road looks fine, but depends how touristy it gets. I wonder how long before the plantations are clear cut though? Aside from turning patches of the landscape into a post apocalyptic movie set for 5 years, the works traffic can be messy and dangerous. Logging trucks aren't equipped with brakes.

    Road is fine, decent surface and two cars can just about pass. It doesn’t get much traffic as it is a dead end so just walkers and people going for a picnic at the reservoir. It’s classic commercial forestry, large chunks have been felled but will presumably get replanted. I’ve never come across logging trucks on my trips up there though.
  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 25,750

    pblakeney said:

    I think the other thing to bear in mind is how quickly time flies as you get older... my perception is that since the start of my 50s, time has flown by, and if the past ten years are anything to go by, it's going to feel like no time and I'll be 70. I've no appetite for the upheaval of moving, so both of my houses (sorry) were bought thinking that either would still suit me in my 8th decade, if I make it that far, even if a mobility scooter has replaced the bikes to get to the shops.

    Time is relative to perception. When you are 10 a year is 10% of your lifetime. When you are 50 a year is only 2%. 5 times faster.
    When you’re 60 a year is probably 5% of your remaining life though.
    Your glass needs filling up. 😉
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • me-109
    me-109 Posts: 1,915

    65 yo male has a 1 in 4 chance of hitting 100.
    In southern England average male life expectancy is c88, and a bit over 90 for a woman.

    If I move down South in my 80s, do I get a few more years?
    What about if I identify as a woman?

    As 88 is about halfway between 65 and 100, does that mean a 65 year old only has a 1 in 2 chance of making 88?
  • surrey_commuter
    surrey_commuter Posts: 18,866
    me-109 said:

    65 yo male has a 1 in 4 chance of hitting 100.
    In southern England average male life expectancy is c88, and a bit over 90 for a woman.

    If I move down South in my 80s, do I get a few more years?
    What about if I identify as a woman?

    As 88 is about halfway between 65 and 100, does that mean a 65 year old only has a 1 in 2 chance of making 88?
    Apply for an annuity with a postcode in the West end of Glasgow and they will offer you a fortune as they will think you are at deaths door, then buy in Sandbanks with your new found riches and live forever.

    At 65 you have an expected life expectancy of 82 so you have a 1 in 2 chance of getting that far.
  • rick_chasey
    rick_chasey Posts: 72,615

    me-109 said:

    65 yo male has a 1 in 4 chance of hitting 100.
    In southern England average male life expectancy is c88, and a bit over 90 for a woman.

    If I move down South in my 80s, do I get a few more years?
    What about if I identify as a woman?

    As 88 is about halfway between 65 and 100, does that mean a 65 year old only has a 1 in 2 chance of making 88?
    Apply for an annuity with a postcode in the West end of Glasgow and they will offer you a fortune as they will think you are at deaths door, then buy in Sandbanks with your new found riches and live forever.

    At 65 you have an expected life expectancy of 82 so you have a 1 in 2 chance of getting that far.
    Must tail off *dramatically* over 82 yikes.
  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 25,750

    me-109 said:

    65 yo male has a 1 in 4 chance of hitting 100.
    In southern England average male life expectancy is c88, and a bit over 90 for a woman.

    If I move down South in my 80s, do I get a few more years?
    What about if I identify as a woman?

    As 88 is about halfway between 65 and 100, does that mean a 65 year old only has a 1 in 2 chance of making 88?
    Apply for an annuity with a postcode in the West end of Glasgow and they will offer you a fortune as they will think you are at deaths door, then buy in Sandbanks with your new found riches and live forever.

    At 65 you have an expected life expectancy of 82 so you have a 1 in 2 chance of getting that far.
    Must tail off *dramatically* over 82 yikes.
    Genes and lifestyle will be major factors but from what I’ve seen an active lifestyle dramatically tails off after 82.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.