Torque wrench set

andyh01
andyh01 Posts: 599
Hey all.
Picked up a Giant Defy advance pro 1 after having my last bike Mason Bokeh stolen along with most of my kit so I'm having to start again.
Firstly I need to adjust saddle height which requires a torque wrench as carbon frame. My main question is can I get away with £35 lifeline set that doesn't have the certificate of calibration or do I need to pay £80 for one with said certificate of calibration?

I'm also looking at setting the bike up as a 7 mile each way commuter, what kit would you carry ? Main thing is I'm getting a Topeak race rocket pump (don't want c02) tyres are tubeless Giant stock SLRs 1 thinking just a cheap tubeless repair kit and a small bottle of stans sealant. Is that enough or need more like multi tool tyre levers spare inner tube etc?

I also have a set of Hunt 50mm carbon wheels, what conditions would you ride the hunts in and for that matter , what about the Giant's? Are they decent seals suitable for winter/year round/light gravel (with the right tyre) or do I need a cheaper alloy set for winter training?

Comments

  • wongataa
    wongataa Posts: 1,001
    The cheaper torque wrench will be just fine.
  • daniel_b
    daniel_b Posts: 11,579
    I bought a proper Sealey torque wrench, and a comprehensive draper bit set - cost be about £50 all in I think.
    Felt F70 05 (Turbo)
    Marin Palisades Trail 91 and 06
    Scott CR1 SL 12
    Cannondale Synapse Adventure 15 & 16 Di2
    Scott Foil 18
  • keezx
    keezx Posts: 1,322
    andyh01 said:

    Hey all.
    CUT
    Firstly I need to adjust saddle height which requires a torque wrench as carbon frame. My main question is can I get away with £35 lifeline set that doesn't have the certificate of calibration or do I need to pay £80 for one with said certificate of calibration?
    CUT

    The precision of a torque wrench is always better than the total precision of the chain of acts which will lead to the desired tension of a screwed connection.
    So any cheapass thing will do...

  • Treat your spares kit for tubeless as you would for a tubed set up plus some bacon strips to help plug bigger holes. This is especially important if you decide not to carry a spare tube.

    Why don't you want to carry co2? - It can be very useful to reseat a tubeless tyre though you need to be aware that it can affect/freeze some sealants. Equally much quicker for inflating a tube if you pop one in. If you do put a tube in a tubless tyre then don't forget to check really carefully for any sharp objects that are stuck in the tyre. It's highly likely that there will be all sorts that have embedded in the tyre and self-sealed that you hadn't noticed.

    Don't forget that tubeless is not fit and forget as you need to top the sealant up every 2-3 months of so.
    Personally I don't carry sealant as if you get a puncture that means you lose all your sealant then the hole is usually that big that only a plug or a tyre boot and tube will get you home. Lezyne make great little tubeless repair kits with repair strips/tool in a handy little canister. Far better to carry one of these than sealant.

    It's also worth getting yourself some Rema tip top tyre repair patches and cement as you will no doubt have to repair a tyre at some point and these are great.

    The cheaper torque wrench will be fine.

    I'd ditch the hunts or just trash them through the winter and then buy some nice handbuilts.