Campagnolo Ekar Brake "little play", disk question.

Hi all,

I’ve just bought an Open Up bike, with an Campagnolo Ekar groupset. Like some others, I’ve got a little « play » on my brake (Front and back). After spending time on the web, changing the rotor seems to be the solution.

I’m not an mechanical expert, I'm just wondering if I can choose any centerlock brake?
Anyway, I’m bringing my bike to my LHS at the end of the week, I’ll let you know.

Tons of thanks in advance.

Comments

  • whyamihere
    whyamihere Posts: 7,706
    You should be able to use any centrelock rotor of the same diameter and thickness. However, I'd question if that is the real solution. There's generally a little bit of movement of the pads in the caliper when the bike is stationary, that can feel like a lot of movement when it's multiplied up to the whole wheel moving. It's perfectly normal though and won't be noticed at all when riding.
  • As above. It's absolutely fine. Mine is exactly the same and it's not been an issue since I started using Ekar in June of '21.
  • Thanks for your answers, I appreciate.
    In my case, I can really feel it if I brake hard on the front and back. But you're right, If I don't try to brake hard, I cannot feel it…

    I'll let you know what my LSB say about it.
    Thanks again
  • Please note that the Ekar rotors are "semi-floating" - so that the braking surface is jointed to the spider that is fixed to the hub.

    If you pull the brakes on with the bike stationary, you can feel (and in some cases sometimes see) the rotor braking surface moving as you "rock" the bike back and forth.

    Movement should be no more than 1mm at the edge of the rotor.

    It's more noticeable on 160s than 140s.

    If you can feel movement while actually braking (i.e. moving) then yes, get the checks done by a Campagnolo ProShop or other tech familiar with Campagnolo.
  • gfk_velo said:

    Please note that the Ekar rotors are "semi-floating" - so that the braking surface is jointed to the spider that is fixed to the hub.

    If you pull the brakes on with the bike stationary, you can feel (and in some cases sometimes see) the rotor braking surface moving as you "rock" the bike back and forth.

    Movement should be no more than 1mm at the edge of the rotor.

    It's more noticeable on 160s than 140s.

    If you can feel movement while actually braking (i.e. moving) then yes, get the checks done by a Campagnolo ProShop or other tech familiar with Campagnolo.

    Thanks you very much for your feedback, I appreciate it.
    I'll let you know what my LBS say about it.

    Thanks