Rear wheel off centre

I have just purchase a pair of secondhand Mavic Aksium wheels to build up a Battaglin frame.
I ride a ribble Pro evo carbon, and tried the wheels out on that first, and they ride trye and central.
Now, I've stripped my ribble and placed everything onto the Battaglin frame, only to discover the rear wheel doesn't sit central on this frame.
It can't be the wheel out of dish because it sat perfect on my ribble.

I have installed the wheel in the NDS position (cassette on the left) to discover the wheel sits central. So could the wheel need dishing?

Really baffled on this one.







Comments

  • masjer
    masjer Posts: 2,613
    Take the quick release lever out and check that the axle sits in the dropout correctly.
    Maybe the gear hanger isn't allowing the axle to fully seat.
  • masjer said:

    Take the quick release lever out and check that the axle sits in the dropout correctly.
    Maybe the gear hanger isn't allowing the axle to fully seat.

    No change dude.
  • MattFalle
    MattFalle Posts: 11,644
    Are the drop outs straight? Do other wheels sit straight in it?
    .
    The camera down the willy isn't anything like as bad as it sounds.
  • Is the frame new and straight ?
  • Munsford0
    Munsford0 Posts: 647
    Does it sit more centrally if you sit the bike on its wheels and open / reclose the QR? AS MF says, do you have another rear wheel you can try in the Battaglin?
  • First.Aspect
    First.Aspect Posts: 16,031
    It isn't helpful that neither of the photos are taken straight on. But in the first photo the tyre looks pretty central in the brake bridge to me.

    Are you sure the frame doesn't just have asymmetrical chain stays?
  • I always turn the bike upside down (so it is resting on the saddle and handlebar tops) and drop the wheel in. Don't tighten the QR, just let it sit in the dropouts and that should tell you if the wheel is able to sit straight or is definitely misaligned.
  • If the wheel sits centrally both ways round in another frame then in all likelihood it is something to do with the Battaglin frame.
    A quick google suggests that some models have an asymmetric rear triangle therefore a standard dished wheel will be offset in the frame

    https://www.saldenbikes.com/battaglin-hyper-custombike.html

    "Battaglin Hyper (Matte Red/Matte White/Carbon) – the endurance road bike. Full carbon UDF monocoque frame and fork, tapered headtube 1″1/8 1″1/4, asymmetric rear triangle, carbon dropouts......"

    You'll need to dish your wheel or sort a new wheel with correct dish for it to fit centrally.
  • MattFalle
    MattFalle Posts: 11,644

    If the wheel sits centrally both ways round in another frame then in all likelihood it is something to do with the Battaglin frame.
    A quick google suggests that some models have an asymmetric rear triangle therefore a standard dished wheel will be offset in the frame

    https://www.saldenbikes.com/battaglin-hyper-custombike.html

    "Battaglin Hyper (Matte Red/Matte White/Carbon) – the endurance road bike. Full carbon UDF monocoque frame and fork, tapered headtube 1″1/8 1″1/4, asymmetric rear triangle, carbon dropouts......"

    You'll need to dish your wheel or sort a new wheel with correct dish for it to fit centrally.

    Now thats a total PITA if thats the case.

    Why would they design the frame like that?
    .
    The camera down the willy isn't anything like as bad as it sounds.
  • masjer
    masjer Posts: 2,613
    I don't think it means that the dropouts aren't parallel, just that the two triangles are a different size/shape. Those Dura ace wheels (a standard wheelset) wouldn't even turn.
  • First.Aspect
    First.Aspect Posts: 16,031
    The general idea is so the frame is better able to transfer the might of an amateur rider.

    If the rear triangle designed to be asymmetric, you wouldn't want to be redishing anything.

    I'm erring towards "nothing to see here".

    What's the maximum tyre width for that frame. Could be tight clearance near the bb because of the sooooper wide rims and tyres we all so badly need so we can slice through the air unimpeded....
  • I think Cannondale used to do this on some of their frames. Just googled that too and they called it AI - Asymmetric Integration and the rear wheel had be be dished specifically.

    A real nonsense....
  • i.bhamra
    i.bhamra Posts: 304
    edited June 2022
    Hard to be sure from the pictures but...wheel looks to be central beween the seatstays, if so then assymetric chainstays sounds like an obvious explanation. Messing with the dishing would mean ruining the alignment between the seatstays - perhaps this is just how it's meant to sit?

    Clearance does look tight though, what width are the tyres? The frame might need something narrower.

    Edit: Just realised First.Aspect has already said all of this above, at least we agree...
  • Not sure how the OP is getting on with this but I was looking last night for information on the bearing sizes for Hollowgram wheels for a Cannondale System 6 and to my surprise Cannondale are still using the AI system for their rear wheels.