Cassette Wear

As my chain started skipping, I reckoned I should change it - happy enough that it lasted two years. However, on the first ride, the skipping was much worse, so I suspected that the cassette would need replaced also.

I'm a bit perturbed because I had replaced the chainset, chain and cassette at the same time two years ago and I wonder should a cassette not last longer, in spite of my propensity for riding on filty country lanes in search of that Pulitzer prize-winning landscape shot.

Anyway, please have a look at my photos of the cassette, at different stages of rotation and let me know if there's anything glaringly wrong with the teeth.

Gummo





Comments

  • mully79
    mully79 Posts: 904
    The idea is to check if you need to change the chain regularly as a worn chain eats the cassette.
    If you ignore the chain wear and ride it till it skips then you will always need to replace both.

    Note: The clue to cassette wear is that it will slip in a certain gear.
    If it slips in all gears then maybe the freehub pawls are slipping or there is something wrong with the set up.
  • N0bodyOfTheGoat
    N0bodyOfTheGoat Posts: 5,822
    edited May 2022
    My commuting Marasa is coming up to two years old, I typically spend a lot more time in the central cassette sprockets with the three chainrings, recently it began to sound awful in the extreme sprockets. The chain was well overdue a change and had put extra wear on those central sprockets.

    Changed the chain and cassette, while also replacing the knackered rear wheel... It now rides much better, even gets taken for some non-commute rides!
    ================
    2020 Voodoo Marasa
    2017 Cube Attain GTC Pro Disc 2016
    2016 Voodoo Wazoo
  • Munsford0
    Munsford0 Posts: 606
    Cassettes tend to wear in a more subtle way than chainrings, so unless it's completely mullered It's hard to spot a worn cassette just by looking at it. What usually happens is what happened to you; new chain skips on worn cassette so both need replacing. So as above, monitor chain wear frequently and replace when 0.75% worn. That way you'll get through 3 or more chains before you need another cassette, and chainrings should last years.
  • paulbnix
    paulbnix Posts: 631
    Buy a chain wear tool such as this

    Check regularly, buy a new chain when you get 0.5% wear and replace it at 0.75% wear.
    I find a chain lasts between 1000 and 3000 miles depending on winter usage.
    A cassette should last 3 or 4 chains.
  • Dorset_Boy
    Dorset_Boy Posts: 6,743
    Giving a length of time a chain and casette have been on a bike is utterly meaningless. you might only have done 2,000 kms each year, or have done 20,000 kms each year.

    Keep your chain and casette clean and lubed and they will last longer. I've been able to get over 9,000 kms out of a chain.
  • trevor.hall12
    trevor.hall12 Posts: 400
    I pretty much find that when someone brings me a bike that's Skipping both chain and casette need to be done ,often changing just one will make it worse
  • gummomarx
    gummomarx Posts: 64
    Thanks very much for your contributions. I'm going to follow the rule of changing the cassette and chain when the chain fails the wear-tool test. I suspect both are lasting just short of two years due to my regular habit of riding on dirty country roads, paths and lanes.
  • gummomarx
    gummomarx Posts: 64
    paulbnix said:

    Buy a chain wear tool such as this

    Check regularly, buy a new chain when you get 0.5% wear and replace it at 0.75% wear.

    I've done that - precious wee tool for £2.85 - wish all tools and components were as cheap. :D
  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 25,260
    Clean and check your chain regularly. Change when required.
    A cassette should last for 3 chains at least when starting from new.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • gummomarx
    gummomarx Posts: 64
    Munsford0 said:

    and chainrings should last years.

    That's the hope - my middle chain-ring costs more than a cassette.

  • gummomarx
    gummomarx Posts: 64
    A great help for someone who can change these components would be if there was a tool for checking teeth as simple as the chain-wear tool.
  • First.Aspect
    First.Aspect Posts: 14,328
    .
  • MattFalle
    MattFalle Posts: 11,644
    Exactly as per DB - don't go giving "oooh, 2,000k for a chain/cassette" kinda stuff.

    Full degrease once a week, decent lube, it'll last for years no matter where you're riding.

    .
    The camera down the willy isn't anything like as bad as it sounds.
  • Dorset_Boy
    Dorset_Boy Posts: 6,743
    gummomarx said:

    Munsford0 said:

    and chainrings should last years.

    That's the hope - my middle chain-ring costs more than a cassette.

    What's a middle chain ring?!!!! :D
  • paulbnix
    paulbnix Posts: 631
    gummomarx said:

    Thanks very much for your contributions. I'm going to follow the rule of changing the cassette and chain when the chain fails the wear-tool test.

    You only need to change the chain when it fails the test.
    This preserves the cassette and chain rings from excessive wear.
    Eventually the new chain will skip on the cassette and that is the signal for a new cassette.