Man refused Giant bike as he was too heavy

elbowloh
elbowloh Posts: 7,078
Bought and paid for his bike, but when he went to pick it up, the shop refused to hand it over as they said he was too heavy to ride safely, even though he said he wouldn't ride it until he was under the max weight.

As a heavy guy myself, 6'5" 95 kg, but have been 110kgs when I was not riding much, I sympathize with the bloke who's trying to lose weight and get fit.

Is Giant wrong to refuse the sale?

https://globalnews.ca/news/7688282/nova-scotia-man-denied-bicycle-weight/
Felt F1 2014
Felt Z6 2012
Red Arthur Caygill steel frame
Tall....
www.seewildlife.co.uk
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Comments

  • dannbodge
    dannbodge Posts: 1,152
    If they've got a weight limit on the bike for safety reasons then I'd agree that they're within their rights to not sell him it.

    They could have got him to sign a disclaimer or something though.
  • thistle_
    thistle_ Posts: 7,217
    dannbodge said:

    If they've got a weight limit on the bike for safety reasons then I'd agree that they're within their rights to not sell him it.

    They could have got him to sign a disclaimer or something though.

    It said in the article that they would've given it to him but he'd have to sign a waiver.
  • joe_totale-2
    joe_totale-2 Posts: 1,333
    thistle_ said:

    dannbodge said:

    If they've got a weight limit on the bike for safety reasons then I'd agree that they're within their rights to not sell him it.

    They could have got him to sign a disclaimer or something though.

    It said in the article that they would've given it to him but he'd have to sign a waiver.
    In that case I don't see what else they could do. The last thing they would want is the bike breaking under the strain causing a nasty accident and then getting sued.

    The real question is whether Giant or other brands should look to make more robust bikes for heavier riders.
  • thistle_
    thistle_ Posts: 7,217

    The real question is whether Giant or other brands should look to make more robust bikes for heavier riders.

    A fat bike? :wink:

  • joe_totale-2
    joe_totale-2 Posts: 1,333
    thistle_ said:

    The real question is whether Giant or other brands should look to make more robust bikes for heavier riders.

    A fat bike? :wink:

    Call them phat bikes, get some C list celebrities from 10 years ago to advertise them and we could be onto something.

    This marketing lark is easy.
  • DeVlaeminck
    DeVlaeminck Posts: 8,893

    thistle_ said:

    dannbodge said:

    If they've got a weight limit on the bike for safety reasons then I'd agree that they're within their rights to not sell him it.

    They could have got him to sign a disclaimer or something though.

    It said in the article that they would've given it to him but he'd have to sign a waiver.
    In that case I don't see what else they could do. The last thing they would want is the bike breaking under the strain causing a nasty accident and then getting sued.

    The real question is whether Giant or other brands should look to make more robust bikes for heavier riders.
    Be interesting if all bikes have weight limits just to cover the manufacturers.
    [Castle Donington Ladies FC - going up in '22]
  • Ben6899
    Ben6899 Posts: 9,686
    They've done him a favour.
    Ben

    Bikes: Donhou DSS4 Custom | Condor Italia RC | Gios Megalite | Dolan Preffisio | Giant Bowery '76
    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ben_h_ppcc/
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  • thistle_
    thistle_ Posts: 7,217
    edited March 2021

    thistle_ said:

    dannbodge said:

    If they've got a weight limit on the bike for safety reasons then I'd agree that they're within their rights to not sell him it.

    They could have got him to sign a disclaimer or something though.

    It said in the article that they would've given it to him but he'd have to sign a waiver.
    In that case I don't see what else they could do. The last thing they would want is the bike breaking under the strain causing a nasty accident and then getting sued.

    The real question is whether Giant or other brands should look to make more robust bikes for heavier riders.
    Be interesting if all bikes have weight limits just to cover the manufacturers.
    I think road bike does (will look later if I remeber), in the instruction book that says riding a bike is dangerous and it's not their fault if you die.
    I think my turbo has a weight limit too.

    My ex MTB (Giant Trance) had something in the book about not riding off road (no jumps, no drop offs maybe) because it will damage the bike :worried:
  • elbowloh
    elbowloh Posts: 7,078
    No one see any irony in that the brand is called Giant?
    Felt F1 2014
    Felt Z6 2012
    Red Arthur Caygill steel frame
    Tall....
    www.seewildlife.co.uk
  • amrushton
    amrushton Posts: 1,305
    No. they were saving themselves the issue of a law suit/refund/bad press.
  • Charlie_Croker
    Charlie_Croker Posts: 1,723
    Shame
      There must be bikes even in Canada that can carry in excess of 21st 6lbs (300lbs Canadian/American), no mention of the Giant model in the article. I find it strange a shop not wanting a sale. I can’t find any reference to weight limits whatsoever on the www.gianthalifax.ca website

      If it had been south of the border I suspect there’d be all sorts of litigation happening now

    #OverweightPeopleMatter
  • MattFalle
    MattFalle Posts: 11,644
    everything has a caveat to protect the manufacturers.

    my old motorbike did 180mph and was marketed through "racing heritage" etc etc etc....

    didn't stop the manual from saying never exceed the speed limit, this tjing can kill you, etc etc.
    .
    The camera down the willy isn't anything like as bad as it sounds.
  • seanoconn
    seanoconn Posts: 11,516
    Give him the bike. It’s in stock, he wants it. They should not be allowed to refuse.
    Pinno, מלך אידיוט וחרא מכונאי
  • kingstongraham
    kingstongraham Posts: 27,352
    When spending time researching which bike to buy, wouldn't you want one that the manufacturer is willing to say won't break with you sitting on it? I think they've done him a favour.
  • piker2
    piker2 Posts: 50
    MattFalle said:

    everything has a caveat to protect the manufacturers.

    my old motorbike did 180mph and was marketed through "racing heritage" etc etc etc....

    didn't stop the manual from saying never exceed the speed limit, this tjing can kill you, etc etc.

    Do you mean your motor bike "could" do 180mph or did it actually do 180mph with you clinging to it?
    On a track day of course. :)
  • MrsR
    MrsR Posts: 81
    edited March 2021
    The article shows Giant has sought to learn from this experience. I anticipate their online booking will cover this scenario in future, in particular in North America where weight is more of a concern. As upsetting as it must have been for the purchaser, as a point of law, Giant show their integrity in maintaining this point. Any goods purchased have to be fit for their intended purpose and if, in their opinion, the bike might not have satisfied that criteria, they were very sensible to accept the ensuing uncomfortable confrontation and associated negative press following it.
  • MattFalle
    MattFalle Posts: 11,644
    piker2 said:

    MattFalle said:

    everything has a caveat to protect the manufacturers.

    my old motorbike did 180mph and was marketed through "racing heritage" etc etc etc....

    didn't stop the manual from saying never exceed the speed limit, this tjing can kill you, etc etc.

    Do you mean your motor bike "could" do 180mph or did it actually do 180mph with you clinging to it?
    On a track day of course. :)
    it make have exceeded to speed limit by mistake on occasion... :wink:
    .
    The camera down the willy isn't anything like as bad as it sounds.
  • mpatts
    mpatts Posts: 1,010
    Updated headline:

    Man buys wrong bike on internet
    Insert bike here:
  • wolfsbane2k
    wolfsbane2k Posts: 3,056
    I'm not quite his weight but close, and have broken 3 bikes ( road frame, gravel bike frame, and a "pub hack hybrid" ) in almost as many years. Both road and gravel frames replaced under warranty. The OEM wheels for the bike both needed replacing quickly too, as spokes were pulling through the rims.

    I fully sympathise with both the shop and the potential rider here, but with the shop offering to sell the guy the bike if he signed the waiver, but he refused to, i'm more supportive of the shop to be fair.

    One of the big things if you're over the weight limit is to ensure it's checked regularly - and i understand /believe that carbon frames fail a lot quicker than a alu frame after initial failure.

    There is a reason that i love my "Clydesdale" class mountain bike, the only one i've not broken - it's a bloody tank. But it also rides like one.
    Intent on Cycling Commuting on a budget, but keep on breaking/crashing/finding nice stuff to buy.
    Bike 1 (Broken) - Bike 2(Borked) - Bike 3(broken spokes) - Bike 4( Needs Work) - Bike 5 (in bits) - Bike 6* ...
  • mpatts
    mpatts Posts: 1,010
    In a parallel universe

    "The other day, a man bought the wrong bike on the internet. When he got to the shop the nice man behind the counter - rather than letting him buy the wrong thing - suggested he should have a browse at something more suitable. The man then had a browse around, bought something else and said "Dude, thanks for the advice - what a cockwomble, I should have read a bit more before clicking"

    You could argue about whether he should have been able to walk out with it, but this misses the point somewhat. Part of the job of any decent bike shop is to point out - nicely of course - when you have bought the wrong thing. Nobody wants to hammer a 10spd campag casette onto their SRAM XD drivetrain just to protect their rights to buy what they want.

    The other day I accidentally bought 4kg of dates. The picture was really small. Anyoen got the number for The TImes? Hold the front page.
    Insert bike here:
  • MattFalle
    MattFalle Posts: 11,644

    The article shows Giant has sought to learn from this experience. I anticipate their online booking will cover this scenario in future, in particular in North America where weight is more of a concern. As upsetting as it must have been for the purchaser, as a point of law, Giant show their integrity in maintaining this point. Any goods purchased have to be fit for their intended purpose and if, in their opinion, the bike might not have satisfied that criteria, they were very sensible to accept the ensuing uncomfortable confrontation and associated negative press following it.

    why is weight more of a concern in North America?
    .
    The camera down the willy isn't anything like as bad as it sounds.
  • wolfsbane2k
    wolfsbane2k Posts: 3,056

    The article shows Giant has sought to learn from this experience. I anticipate their online booking will cover this scenario in future, in particular in North America where weight is more of a concern. As upsetting as it must have been for the purchaser, as a point of law, Giant show their integrity in maintaining this point. Any goods purchased have to be fit for their intended purpose and if, in their opinion, the bike might not have satisfied that criteria, they were very sensible to accept the ensuing uncomfortable confrontation and associated negative press following it.

    Indeed. Hopefully what the companies will learn is they need to build bikes that are more capable than the flimsy 110kg normally applied for a "racing bike", 125kg for a "road bike" and a 137kg (300lb) for a tourer.

    i've been pointed at the decathlon riverside 920, which comes with a cracking 170kg limit.. now might actually allow me to ride to work with both my lunch, laptop, and snacks!
    Intent on Cycling Commuting on a budget, but keep on breaking/crashing/finding nice stuff to buy.
    Bike 1 (Broken) - Bike 2(Borked) - Bike 3(broken spokes) - Bike 4( Needs Work) - Bike 5 (in bits) - Bike 6* ...
  • Indeed. Hopefully what the companies will learn is they need to build bikes that are more capable than the flimsy 110kg normally applied for a "racing bike", 125kg for a "road bike" and a 137kg (300lb) for a tourer.

    i've been pointed at the decathlon riverside 920, which comes with a cracking 170kg limit.. now might actually allow me to ride to work with both my lunch, laptop, and snacks!

    When that niche adventure/tourer was talked about on the STW forum around Xmas, one or two pointed out that https://www.decathlon.co.uk/p/touring-bike-riverside-touring-520/_/R-p-312723 looks to use the same frame and have the same limit.

    ================
    2020 Voodoo Marasa
    2017 Cube Attain GTC Pro Disc 2016
    2016 Voodoo Wazoo
  • johngti
    johngti Posts: 2,508
    MattFalle said:

    piker2 said:

    MattFalle said:

    everything has a caveat to protect the manufacturers.

    my old motorbike did 180mph and was marketed through "racing heritage" etc etc etc....

    didn't stop the manual from saying never exceed the speed limit, this tjing can kill you, etc etc.

    Do you mean your motor bike "could" do 180mph or did it actually do 180mph with you clinging to it?
    On a track day of course. :)
    it make have exceeded to speed limit by mistake on occasion... :wink:
    Mine could only do 155mph. What I’ve heard is, on the one occasion when it did, at 1.30am on a deserted straight stretch of road, the rider cacked his pants and decided it was far too fast for any sensible person to travel on a motorbike.
  • MrsR
    MrsR Posts: 81
    MattFalle said:

    The article shows Giant has sought to learn from this experience. I anticipate their online booking will cover this scenario in future, in particular in North America where weight is more of a concern. As upsetting as it must have been for the purchaser, as a point of law, Giant show their integrity in maintaining this point. Any goods purchased have to be fit for their intended purpose and if, in their opinion, the bike might not have satisfied that criteria, they were very sensible to accept the ensuing uncomfortable confrontation and associated negative press following it.

    why is weight more of a concern in North America?
    The UK may be classified as one of the fattest European nations but sadly the US obesity statistics are on another level. Not necessarily for want of trying to avoid it though. I lived in California for a couple of years and the number of overweight participants in triathlons and running events was notable compared to what I witnessed in the UK.

  • MrsR
    MrsR Posts: 81

    The article shows Giant has sought to learn from this experience. I anticipate their online booking will cover this scenario in future, in particular in North America where weight is more of a concern. As upsetting as it must have been for the purchaser, as a point of law, Giant show their integrity in maintaining this point. Any goods purchased have to be fit for their intended purpose and if, in their opinion, the bike might not have satisfied that criteria, they were very sensible to accept the ensuing uncomfortable confrontation and associated negative press following it.

    Indeed. Hopefully what the companies will learn is they need to build bikes that are more capable than the flimsy 110kg normally applied for a "racing bike", 125kg for a "road bike" and a 137kg (300lb) for a tourer.

    i've been pointed at the decathlon riverside 920, which comes with a cracking 170kg limit.. now might actually allow me to ride to work with both my lunch, laptop, and snacks!

    Good for you persevering! Your post made me chuckle. 😂
  • Harry182
    Harry182 Posts: 1,169
    MattFalle said:

    The article shows Giant has sought to learn from this experience. I anticipate their online booking will cover this scenario in future, in particular in North America where weight is more of a concern. As upsetting as it must have been for the purchaser, as a point of law, Giant show their integrity in maintaining this point. Any goods purchased have to be fit for their intended purpose and if, in their opinion, the bike might not have satisfied that criteria, they were very sensible to accept the ensuing uncomfortable confrontation and associated negative press following it.

    why is weight more of a concern in North America?
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ouZ2T3guFw
  • MattFalle
    MattFalle Posts: 11,644

    MattFalle said:

    The article shows Giant has sought to learn from this experience. I anticipate their online booking will cover this scenario in future, in particular in North America where weight is more of a concern. As upsetting as it must have been for the purchaser, as a point of law, Giant show their integrity in maintaining this point. Any goods purchased have to be fit for their intended purpose and if, in their opinion, the bike might not have satisfied that criteria, they were very sensible to accept the ensuing uncomfortable confrontation and associated negative press following it.

    why is weight more of a concern in North America?
    The UK may be classified as one of the fattest European nations but sadly the US obesity statistics are on another level. Not necessarily for want of trying to avoid it though. I lived in California for a couple of years and the number of overweight participants in triathlons and running events was notable compared to what I witnessed in the UK.

    Your country is still full of fatties and has a massively obese percentile of population when compared to everywhere so I wouldn't be casting aspersions around if I were you.

    Your sentence should probably read "in NA and Britain where...."
    .
    The camera down the willy isn't anything like as bad as it sounds.
  • MrsR
    MrsR Posts: 81
    edited March 2021
    MattFalle said:

    MattFalle said:

    The article shows Giant has sought to learn from this experience. I anticipate their online booking will cover this scenario in future, in particular in North America where weight is more of a concern. As upsetting as it must have been for the purchaser, as a point of law, Giant show their integrity in maintaining this point. Any goods purchased have to be fit for their intended purpose and if, in their opinion, the bike might not have satisfied that criteria, they were very sensible to accept the ensuing uncomfortable confrontation and associated negative press following it.

    why is weight more of a concern in North America?
    The UK may be classified as one of the fattest European nations but sadly the US obesity statistics are on another level. Not necessarily for want of trying to avoid it though. I lived in California for a couple of years and the number of overweight participants in triathlons and running events was notable compared to what I witnessed in the UK.

    Your country is still full of fatties and has a massively obese percentile of population when compared to everywhere so I wouldn't be casting aspersions around if I were you.

    Your sentence should probably read "in NA and Britain where...."
    Sorry if it has offended you, Not at all intended. I mentioned facts, not opinion or name calling, but appreciate even that can still sting. (May I suggest editing your wording as it is not terribly sensitive? You might also edit "your country" when you actually mean the UK. "My" country has less than 7% obesity.)

  • MrsR
    MrsR Posts: 81
    This is the sort of data that companies like Giant could (and I am sure are) usefully refer to in considering their target global markets. https://ourworldindata.org/obesity