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Movement of bike - Too much on a Wahoo Kickr?

Hi all,
I’ve had a Wattbike Pro for the last four years which has been ultra reliable and rock solid when riding it which I have really liked.
I’ve linked the Pro to Zwift with good success, but am now after a smart trainer to really get the most out of the Zwift experience.
I am debating between the new Wattbike Atom, or going the Kickr or Neo route. I’m put off the very long waiting list for the Atom.
I trialled my friend’s Kickr this week. I was very impressed by the quietness and smoothness of it. However, I was disconcerted by the inbuilt movement that it had. Coming to it from the Pro it seemed to move a bit too excessively for me. Everything was set up correctly. I believe the front wheel can be put on a block to stop that movement, but I would be interested in people’s thoughts on the rear movement please and whether they like it? I would also value people who have the Neo describing whether it has movement, or whether it is more ‘solid’ than the Kickr?
Thanks in advance all. Molteni.

Posts

  • thistle_(mbnw)thistle_(mbnw) Posts: 3,870
    A standalone Kickr trainer or a Kickr bike?
  • dannbodgedannbodge Posts: 927
    I have a Neo and it's not a solid trainer, the design allows the hinges to rock a little bit so the bike can move a little bit underneath you.
    I've had a Flux which was rock solid and the Neo is much more comfortable.

    It's not so much rocking you think that you're going to fall off, it's just a little bit of wobble.
  • molteni_manmolteni_man Posts: 234

    A standalone Kickr trainer or a Kickr bike?

    Thinking of going for the stand alone unit so that my wife can also use her bike on it. Sorry didn’t make this clear.
  • molteni_manmolteni_man Posts: 234
    dannbodge said:

    I have a Neo and it's not a solid trainer, the design allows the hinges to rock a little bit so the bike can move a little bit underneath you.
    I've had a Flux which was rock solid and the Neo is much more comfortable.

    It's not so much rocking you think that you're going to fall off, it's just a little bit of wobble.

    Cheers dannbodge - that’s good to know. I think it was jumping straight on the Kickr from the Pro which is rock solid.
    Do you use a front wheel block out of interest and if not what’s the movement of the handlebar like? As I said above this was something of a surprise in how much they moved around.
  • thistle_(mbnw)thistle_(mbnw) Posts: 3,870

    A standalone Kickr trainer or a Kickr bike?

    Thinking of going for the stand alone unit so that my wife can also use her bike on it. Sorry didn’t make this clear.
    No problem - "Kickr" covers quite a few products these days!
  • andyh01andyh01 Posts: 570
    I'm looking at either the Neo 2t or kickr v5 for my £3k Mason Bokeh Allimimium bike (my only bike) and worried about any long term frame damage caused by pro longed use of DD turbos.
    I understand the kickr v5 "upgrade" from previous version is the Flexi feet, designed to offer the side/side sway movement rather than being "rock solid" so I guess some movement is desirable which may help elevate some stress of frame and more comfortable for the rider and ride feel.

    Personally if I had another user and if budget could stretch I'd look at a smart bike, is it Stages? Smart bike be adjustable, rather than having to swap bikes around for different users and less wear and tear/mechanicals of outdoor bike to worry about always clean and available
  • diamonddogdiamonddog Posts: 3,368
    edited 18 October
    andyh01
    I have an alu bike as a turbo only bike, originally on a wheel on turbo and now on a Tacx Flux dd turbo.
    Up to date it has done 8 years with no frame or other problems, it just sits on the turbo and does the job.
  • dannbodgedannbodge Posts: 927
    edited 18 October

    dannbodge said:

    I have a Neo and it's not a solid trainer, the design allows the hinges to rock a little bit so the bike can move a little bit underneath you.
    I've had a Flux which was rock solid and the Neo is much more comfortable.

    It's not so much rocking you think that you're going to fall off, it's just a little bit of wobble.

    Cheers dannbodge - that’s good to know. I think it was jumping straight on the Kickr from the Pro which is rock solid.
    Do you use a front wheel block out of interest and if not what’s the movement of the handlebar like? As I said above this was something of a surprise in how much they moved around.
    Yes. The Neo comes with a front wheel block which holds the front wheel pretty firm.

    I use both my Carbon S-Works on the Neo. My newer one is covered under warranty for use on a turbo, and the old one do any owe me anything (both are 11spd and use the same chain lube etc too)
  • molteni_manmolteni_man Posts: 234
    Thanks to add to the thread everyone. Good to know re the front wheel block and how it keeps the front wheel steady.
    Andyho1 - yes still debating- I have loved just jumping on the Wattbike. Equally as dannbodge has added all bikes/ frames stand up well so I could rig up the summer best bike for turbo use. Haven’t been able to tie up the deal with the chap for the Wattbike for ages - no ones fault so I’ll keep reading on here for your thoughts. Thank you all.
  • andyh01andyh01 Posts: 570
    I personally prefer the look (and although I haven't tried any, other than gym spin bikes) "realistic feel" of DD turbos + bike over a smart (spin) bike and of course turbo cheaper than smart bike. Having said that, I would prefer a seperate "indoor" bike or even a second summer best bike (no budget ATM for both turbo and decent second bike) and only swap bikes on turbo over summer/winter. I also like the idea of being able to try different group sets (some smart bikes have the ability to switch say between SRAM, Shimano and Compay) I'd be even more tempted by a smart bike, if like you, I had another user to consider, otherwise between you, you'll always be having to swap bikes constantly (unless you both can use same one on turbo) provided of course, you don't mind sharing and don't want ride together at same time, in which case, need two turbo's
    Also some connected smart bikes have their own "built in" tablets
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