Eeek: Tyre and Wheel glued together

jeepie
jeepie Posts: 497
Hi Team,

I have just upgraded my 12 year old Bianchi to an Rose X Lite 4. I am going to write my impressions of the bike as promised, but immediately hit a snag.

I punctured.

I have rose 40 disc wheels and continental 5000 tyres.

https://www.rosebikes.co.uk/rose-rc-forty-disc-carbon-road-wheels-2677929?product_shape=carbon&article_size=28"/700C

Tyres

https://www.rosebikes.co.uk/continental-grand-prix-5000-folding-road-tyre-2676170?product_shape=black/black

When I came to my tried and trusted tyres change technique (used 100s of times with levers, pocket rocket) 5 miles from home to my horror the rim and the tyre are glued together.

I have no idea what to do and had to get picked up.

Is this a new modern tyre system I need to learn? Could you give me any tips with how to get back on the road? And how to maintain this type of system, particularly if I puncture on a ride and need mobile tools.

Sorry noooob question here.

Cheers

Greg

Comments

  • webboo
    webboo Posts: 6,087
    I would do a search for tubeless tyres. Once you have read all the threads your Rose will be as old as your Bianchi.
  • It's a sealed unit. The tyre is designed to last the lifetime of the bike, so you'll have to buy a new one.
  • jeepie
    jeepie Posts: 497
    It certainly seems that way @darkhairedlord

    Can you help me get started -

    do I need to take the tire off? As it's glued on how do I do that?
    some tubeless videos show people putting tubes in so it's very confusing what to follow.

    I just need to get started on the right path. Changing the bike isn't it ;)
  • shortfall
    shortfall Posts: 3,288
    edited August 2020
    Sounds like you have tubular tyres which are totally different to tubeless. Tubulars are glued onto the rim. Some people fix punctures in them with Tufo solution or similar, some people post them off to specialists who do tub repairs (may be worth it if your tyre costs 70 quid) and some people bin them and glue a new one on. Tubulars aren't for everyone but they have their advocates for normal road use.
  • whyamihere
    whyamihere Posts: 7,702
    It's not glued on and it's not a tubular, it's just very tight. You need to push the side of the tyre in towards the centre of the rim - This can require a lot of force because the bead locks into place on the rim. Once you have it started though, the rest of the bead will move a lot more easily, and then you'll be able to get the tyre off normally. You may have to do the same operation on both sides of the wheel.

    If you've ever seen a car tyre being changed, the first thing that's done is a large machine pushes the sidewall in to break the bead off the bead lock on the wheel. This is the same idea, but on a smaller scale.
  • shortfall
    shortfall Posts: 3,288

    It's not glued on and it's not a tubular, it's just very tight. You need to push the side of the tyre in towards the centre of the rim - This can require a lot of force because the bead locks into place on the rim. Once you have it started though, the rest of the bead will move a lot more easily, and then you'll be able to get the tyre off normally. You may have to do the same operation on both sides of the wheel.

    If you've ever seen a car tyre being changed, the first thing that's done is a large machine pushes the sidewall in to break the bead off the bead lock on the wheel. This is the same idea, but on a smaller scale.

    My mistake I skim read the first post and just picked up on the big about the tyre being glued onto the rim. Some tubeless tyre/rim combos are very tight but before you remove it have a look on YouTube or Cycle Clinic about repairing with a tyre worm/plug. Takes seconds, costs pennies.
  • jeepie
    jeepie Posts: 497
    Thanks @shortfall and @whyamihere - so it sounds like the old system I'm used to I just can't see the tyre bead and it looks "welded" / "glued" in place? OK cool. I will try to remove it with levers. Thanks chaps - really appreciated the input - jokes are fine too; we all gotta learn some place. Will let you know how I get on.

    Cheers

    Greg
  • whyamihere
    whyamihere Posts: 7,702
    edited August 2020
    This picture shows the difference quite well:



    You can see that on the traditional rim, there's nothing to stop the tyre bead from falling in towards the centre, and it's only the tyre pressure that keeps it there, so when the pressure is gone, the bead becomes loose. On a tubeless rim like the Rose 40s, the bead sits on the shelf (sometimes with a small lip to really lock it in place), and needs a bit of violence to push the bead off the shelf into the centre to loosen it off.
  • shortfall
    shortfall Posts: 3,288
    You may also want to invest in some VAR levers if the tyre does have to come off. See Cycle Clinic website again but my bet is that a worm will fix it.
  • gp5000 tyres use tubes. The tyre an be pushes of the rim. i do that by hand. I work with my hands so i have the strength to do it.
    Levers won't push the tyre of the rim.

    A pair of mole grips can help if its really can't be pushed
    www.thecycleclinic.co.uk
  • jeepie
    jeepie Posts: 497
    You were right guys @whyamihere and @shortfall . Thanks so much. It was a matter of pushing hard with thumbs towards the centre of the wheel to unpop the rim which was very tight against the wheel edge. All done! Thank you
  • shortfall
    shortfall Posts: 3,288
    Glad you got it sorted but I was wrong! I should read the original post properly.