Scorchio!

So, who is going to be brave enough to ride their bike in the predicted 30c plus weather over the weekend?
Not a Giro Hero!

Comments

  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 26,169
    I wish! Family have other plans.
    FWIW, I hate high temperatures at rest but have ridden quite comfortably in 38 degrees. Wind chill may be minimal but it helps.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • Charlie_Croker
    Charlie_Croker Posts: 1,720
    Sounds brilliant, I do hope to get time to be out n about in this lovely warm stuff
    …and home before any thunderstorms put a dampener on things





  • lincolndave
    lincolndave Posts: 9,441
    It will be riding earlier for me, hopefully relaxing in the afternoon sun
  • briantrumpet
    briantrumpet Posts: 18,431
    It was a little warm here yesterday... 35C for most of the afternoon, and topped out at 39C. One of the harder 95-mile rides I've done.
  • rick_chasey
    rick_chasey Posts: 73,607
    For sure. Evenings when it’s weather like this are glorious.
  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 41,370
    I don't cycle much these days but would happily go out today if I could. I would avoid bigger climbs though, especially those exposed to the sun.

    I tend to run more these days and tend to struggle in the heat as there's less cooling effect. If I race anything upwards of the high teens is challenging. That said, when we had the couple of hot days towards the end of June I did a 10k run along Brighton seafront when it had been 34 degrees (it was down to about 32 when I ran).
  • rick_chasey
    rick_chasey Posts: 73,607
    Running?! What kind of psychopath are you?!
  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 41,370
    Too lazy to sort out the bike and get kitted up. Running takes up less time.
  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 41,370
    Nah, to feel like I've done a worthwhile bike ride I would expect to be out 2-4 hours. Even my longest marathon training runs only take 3.5 hours and I don't have to wash a dirty bike when I get home. It probably takes 10 minutes less to get ready and out of the house too.
  • singleton
    singleton Posts: 2,523
    30 miles last night starting around 6:15, and will try to get 30-40 done tomorrow morning - although tomorrow doesn't look as hot.
  • kingstongraham
    kingstongraham Posts: 26,750
    Pross said:

    Nah, to feel like I've done a worthwhile bike ride I would expect to be out 2-4 hours. Even my longest marathon training runs only take 3.5 hours and I don't have to wash a dirty bike when I get home. It probably takes 10 minutes less to get ready and out of the house too.

    Interesting - I don't feel much difference in effort between a 20 minute 5k run to a 20 minute lap of Richmond Park. I guess it is harder to maintain the effort on the bike, but if I push hard, I can get a worthwhile ride in half an hour. It's not the same as "going for a ride", but I enjoy the feeling anyway.
  • TheBigBean
    TheBigBean Posts: 20,895
    Pross said:

    Nah, to feel like I've done a worthwhile bike ride I would expect to be out 2-4 hours. Even my longest marathon training runs only take 3.5 hours and I don't have to wash a dirty bike when I get home. It probably takes 10 minutes less to get ready and out of the house too.

    An opinion that should probably go in the unpopular on bikeradar opinions thread. I agree though. The problem with running is that it breaks bodies.
  • TheBigBean
    TheBigBean Posts: 20,895

    Pross said:

    Nah, to feel like I've done a worthwhile bike ride I would expect to be out 2-4 hours. Even my longest marathon training runs only take 3.5 hours and I don't have to wash a dirty bike when I get home. It probably takes 10 minutes less to get ready and out of the house too.

    Interesting - I don't feel much difference in effort between a 20 minute 5k run to a 20 minute lap of Richmond Park. I guess it is harder to maintain the effort on the bike, but if I push hard, I can get a worthwhile ride in half an hour. It's not the same as "going for a ride", but I enjoy the feeling anyway.
    That's ok if you live next to Richmond Park, otherwise you have to include the getting to Richmond Park time.
  • TheBigBean
    TheBigBean Posts: 20,895
    Strava had a challenge a few years ago to climb the same amount as one tour stage in one week. I thought it would be fun and worked out how many times I had to climb my local hill every day. It was something like 14 times which was entirely doable, but really boring and it took about two hours, so I gave up after day one. I wasn't even that tired.

    In comparison, a run around the park was much nicer, less boring and more tiring. Until my knee broke.
  • kingstongraham
    kingstongraham Posts: 26,750

    Pross said:

    Nah, to feel like I've done a worthwhile bike ride I would expect to be out 2-4 hours. Even my longest marathon training runs only take 3.5 hours and I don't have to wash a dirty bike when I get home. It probably takes 10 minutes less to get ready and out of the house too.

    Interesting - I don't feel much difference in effort between a 20 minute 5k run to a 20 minute lap of Richmond Park. I guess it is harder to maintain the effort on the bike, but if I push hard, I can get a worthwhile ride in half an hour. It's not the same as "going for a ride", but I enjoy the feeling anyway.
    That's ok if you live next to Richmond Park, otherwise you have to include the getting to Richmond Park time.
    Hadn't thought of that. It may also work with other roads, but it's true that it is much harder in a city to get a road where you can relatively safely get even 10 minutes of sustained effort.
  • TheBigBean
    TheBigBean Posts: 20,895

    Pross said:

    Nah, to feel like I've done a worthwhile bike ride I would expect to be out 2-4 hours. Even my longest marathon training runs only take 3.5 hours and I don't have to wash a dirty bike when I get home. It probably takes 10 minutes less to get ready and out of the house too.

    Interesting - I don't feel much difference in effort between a 20 minute 5k run to a 20 minute lap of Richmond Park. I guess it is harder to maintain the effort on the bike, but if I push hard, I can get a worthwhile ride in half an hour. It's not the same as "going for a ride", but I enjoy the feeling anyway.
    That's ok if you live next to Richmond Park, otherwise you have to include the getting to Richmond Park time.
    Hadn't thought of that. It may also work with other roads, but it's true that it is much harder in a city to get a road where you can relatively safely get even 10 minutes of sustained effort.
    Faff factor and getting to exercise place is definitely a consideration. Swimming scores really badly on this front unless you live next to a lake.
  • parmos
    parmos Posts: 100
    i done my commute today 12.5 miles but came on the mtb so i can have a little venture off the beaten track on my way home then BBQ and beers in the garden.

    plan is to do a road ride in the morning for a few hours as well at leisure that is
  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 41,370

    Pross said:

    Nah, to feel like I've done a worthwhile bike ride I would expect to be out 2-4 hours. Even my longest marathon training runs only take 3.5 hours and I don't have to wash a dirty bike when I get home. It probably takes 10 minutes less to get ready and out of the house too.

    Interesting - I don't feel much difference in effort between a 20 minute 5k run to a 20 minute lap of Richmond Park. I guess it is harder to maintain the effort on the bike, but if I push hard, I can get a worthwhile ride in half an hour. It's not the same as "going for a ride", but I enjoy the feeling anyway.
    It's difficult to find anywhere around here where you can put that sort of effort in without regular stops at junctions etc. even though I'm on the edge of the countryside. A 30 minute session on the turbo is comparable though. Theoretically you must be right though as 30 minutes at a particular HR should be the same no matter how you are performing it but as I don't race on a bike anymore but do a lot of running events the specificity also plays a part. Running is definitely harder than cycling when it's hot though due to the cooling effect of the higher speed on the bike.
  • Dorset_Boy
    Dorset_Boy Posts: 7,086
    edited July 2020
    Hot you say?
    Try riding around Lake Annecy in 40+ degrees, or finishing up a mountain climb on the Etape, or on any other day in 38+ degrees. That's hot.
    today's temperatures are just pleasantly warm!
    Will be out for 25-30 miles this afternoon, and 80 odd tomorrow, day 136 on the bounce....
  • kingstongraham
    kingstongraham Posts: 26,750
    I love riding in hot weather - I think the only time I've felt too hot was in the heatwave a few years ago, commuting in about 38 degrees. Much better than public transport though.
  • darkhairedlord
    darkhairedlord Posts: 7,180
    I much prefer the heat, keeps the muscles supple.
  • mpatts
    mpatts Posts: 1,010
    I am going to run to my bike mechanic to pick up my new very old gents Raleigh, then ride it home.
    Insert bike here:
  • ugo.santalucia
    ugo.santalucia Posts: 28,300
    Went out at 6:45... it was 15.5 degrees... finished the ride at 10 AM, it was 28.5 degrees... :o
    For the most it was very enjoyable, except the last half an hour or so
    left the forum March 2023
  • rick_chasey
    rick_chasey Posts: 73,607
    Back from my evening ride.

    Little toasty but windy.

    Biggest bummer was being stung by something and now my left shoulder is numb
  • daniel_b
    daniel_b Posts: 11,652

    ...

    ?

    Felt F70 05 (Turbo)
    Marin Palisades Trail 91 and 06
    Scott CR1 SL 12
    Cannondale Synapse Adventure 15 & 16 Di2
    Scott Foil 18
  • briantrumpet
    briantrumpet Posts: 18,431
    daniel_b said:

    ...

    ?


    Not exactly scorchio in Devon either. All a bit pants, in fact.