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Rear wheel is nearer NDS (non drive side) chainstay

morxymorxy Posts: 114
Problem:
My rear wheel is correctly dished and true. It has a 700x28mm tyre on it. I mount it in my frame. The tyre is 4mm away from the DS chainstay, but only 2mm from the NDS chainstay :(

Desired outcome
Rear wheel should be equidistant from both DS and NDS chainstays: i.e. 3mm away from each. (Tight clearance, I know.)

How should I solve?
1. Use a Park Tool FFG-2 to ensure my rear dropouts are directly facing each other. Trouble is, FFG-2 costs £100 :(
2. Insert a 2mm washer between the locknut and the cone on the NDS side of the axle, thereby pushing the rim away from the NDS chainstay.
3. Tighten each spoke that connects to the DS side of the hub, thus pulling the rim 1mm nearer the DS. Trouble is, wheel would then sit askew in other frames :(
4. Gently file the rear part of the DS dropout - the 10 o'clock region, if looking sideways on - making the DS side of the axle sit, say 0.2mm, behind the NDS side of the axle when clamped, thereby tilting the rim nearer the DS chainstay. Reckless idea probably!

What would you do?

Posts

  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 25,092
    You could do nothing. There is no harm in a rear wheel which is not perfectly central. If it was the front, that would be a different matter, but the rear you won't even notice.
    I certainly would not start messing with the frame
  • me-109me-109 Posts: 1,306
    Do other wheels do the same thing in this frame?
  • morxymorxy Posts: 114

    You could do nothing. There is no harm in a rear wheel which is not perfectly central.

    Good point. I only asked because 2mm of clearance seems minimal. I'd like to run a 28mm tyre, but 25 is probably safer.
    me-109 said:

    Do other wheels do the same thing in this frame?

    Yes. I have a new DA 9000 C24 rear wheel, fresh out the box. It's the same as my other (RS80) wheel. Both are equally true. Both sit 4mm from the DS chainstay and 2mm from the NDS chainstay.
  • WheelspinnerWheelspinner Posts: 4,792
    morxy said:

    Problem:
    My rear wheel is correctly dished and true. It has a 700x28mm tyre on it. I mount it in my frame. The tyre is 4mm away from the DS chainstay, but only 2mm from the NDS chainstay :(

    Desired outcome
    Rear wheel should be equidistant from both DS and NDS chainstays: i.e. 3mm away from each. (Tight clearance, I know.)

    How should I solve?
    1. Use a Park Tool FFG-2 to ensure my rear dropouts are directly facing each other. Trouble is, FFG-2 costs £100 :(
    2. Insert a 2mm washer between the locknut and the cone on the NDS side of the axle, thereby pushing the rim away from the NDS chainstay.
    3. Tighten each spoke that connects to the DS side of the hub, thus pulling the rim 1mm nearer the DS. Trouble is, wheel would then sit askew in other frames :(
    4. Gently file the rear part of the DS dropout - the 10 o'clock region, if looking sideways on - making the DS side of the axle sit, say 0.2mm, behind the NDS side of the axle when clamped, thereby tilting the rim nearer the DS chainstay. Reckless idea probably!

    What would you do?

    If you have 4mm one side and 2 on the other, you only need a 1mm washer to even things up, not a 2? That would just shift the offset to the other side?
  • pilot_petepilot_pete Posts: 1,961
    Surely adding a washer isn’t necessarily going to even the gaps either side of the tyre up though? Depends on the frame design and material etc. Unless it is a traditional metal frame with identical chain stays how would you know where the ‘bend’ is going to take place? Many modern carbon frames have asymmetric chain stays.

    Sounds like the frame was made with this offset either intentionally (can’t think why) or in error.

    PP
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,747
    Is the wheel 'square' in the frame? it could be its slightly twisted as opposed to side to side.
    Try holding the wheel rim (at front) pushed towards the DS as you do up the QR. One end of the axle will only need to be about 0.2mm out in the dropout to twist the wheel to 1mm out at the rim.
  • morxymorxy Posts: 114


    If you have 4mm one side and 2 on the other, you only need a 1mm washer...

    You're right. My bad!

    Btw the frame is a Syncrony RS100, a cheap 6061 aluminium frame from the early 2000s. The seat and chainstays look perfectly symmetrical - both identically angled and thick. That seems to be the designer's intention anyway.


    Try holding the wheel rim (at front) pushed towards the DS as you do up the QR. One end of the axle will only need to be about 0.2mm out in the dropout to twist the wheel to 1mm out at the rim.

    Thanks. I'll try manipulating how the axle sits in the dropouts, ensure it's square... Then I'll try a 1mm washer. Lastly, I'll adjust spokes to bring the rim DS-ward 1mm.

    ...Or I'll go from 28 to 25mm tyres and gain space that way ;)
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 25,092
    If you adjust the dish of the wheel, you make more damage than good. You'd have to relax the tension of the NDS even further, which means the wheel will be weak and spokes might break as a result. As I said earlier, the best course of action is to leave it alone and stop faffing with it.
  • Might be wrong but just to check....do you have a bike with asymmetric chainstays? Some frames with these have off centre dropout centres points compares to the frames centre point.
  • pinnopinno Posts: 39,184
    edited 25 July
    None of this really solves the problem if the OP wants to run fatter tyres.
    Given 3mm either side of the tyre IF you could centre the wheel, isn't a lot of room.
    S - https://i.pinimg.com/564x/35/cd/f1/35cdf125f02216d233fc9aa90f8607e6.jpg
    W - (still at Atlantic boulevard). Neill broke his collarbone.

    "Why are the tractors beeping in the night? I dunno woss goin' on"
    Tricky, 9yo
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