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Electric pump or compressor

Hi All

Is anyone using a electric pump and or a small compressor (ideally mains powered)

I’ve seen the fumpa pumps but ideally I’d like a main powered one.

Posts

  • oxomanoxoman Posts: 7,520
    I have a small air compressor as I use airtools, however for my bikes I always use my track pump.
    Too many bikes according to Mrs O.
  • 6wheels6wheels Posts: 408
    I also have a small compressor, mainly used for assembly work - very useful.
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 24,379
  • nbuuifxnbuuifx Posts: 289
    I have a compressor, a Ring 12v pump and a Track pump.

    For the cars - the compressor gets used every time. The retractable hose reaches all over the drive.

    For the bikes the track pump gets used every time.

    The Ring 12v pump rarely gets used and is stored in the car for emergencies. It pumps the car tyres up fine but the compressor is easier and quicker. For the bikes it isn't actually very good. It is fine for the kids bikes and my MTB but struggles with the high PSI on the road bike. It says it does 174psi in the manual which it might do but it needs a running start. By this I mean if the tyre is at 50psi and I turn it on then it works fine and inflates the tyre until I stop - it is handy that you can set a preset too for it to stop at. However if the tyre is at say 80psi and I want to pump it up to 90psi, then it won't work - it just stalls when starting from a high PSI. I have to then let air out down to around 50psi, to then pump up to 90psi.
  • lesfirthlesfirth Posts: 1,012
    nbuuifx said:

    I have a compressor, a Ring 12v pump and a Track pump.

    For the cars - the compressor gets used every time. The retractable hose reaches all over the drive.

    For the bikes the track pump gets used every time.

    The Ring 12v pump rarely gets used and is stored in the car for emergencies. It pumps the car tyres up fine but the compressor is easier and quicker. For the bikes it isn't actually very good. It is fine for the kids bikes and my MTB but struggles with the high PSI on the road bike. It says it does 174psi in the manual which it might do but it needs a running start. By this I mean if the tyre is at 50psi and I turn it on then it works fine and inflates the tyre until I stop - it is handy that you can set a preset too for it to stop at. However if the tyre is at say 80psi and I want to pump it up to 90psi, then it won't work - it just stalls when starting from a high PSI. I have to then let air out down to around 50psi, to then pump up to 90psi.

    You are lucky that yours just stalls . Most disintegrate if you try that but I dont see why you need it anyway.
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 24,379
    So, people buy an electric compressor because they can't be axxed to use a track pump? Is it really where we are?
  • david37david37 Posts: 156

    So, people buy an electric compressor because they can't be axxed to use a track pump? Is it really where we are?

    And shifting is apparently only to be done electronically, throw in the electric motor and theyre not far from an automatic bike
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,280
    Has anyone got the fumpa pump for out on the road ? I'd just be worried about the battery not being full enough when I need it.
    And a pump seems easier.
  • focuszing723focuszing723 Posts: 757
    david37 said:

    So, people buy an electric compressor because they can't be axxed to use a track pump? Is it really where we are?

    And shifting is apparently only to be done electronically, throw in the electric motor and theyre not far from an automatic bike
    No issues with cable stretch and the ability to sequentially shift. I bet there were people saying gears were a travesty to the purity of cycling when the derailleur was conceived. Without innovation you'd both be sat in a cave painting stick men on the wall.

    How do you think you have the luxury to be able to sit at home and moan/communicate with each other in this way?
  • david37david37 Posts: 156
    i dont get problems with cable stretch, I'm not sure cables ever really stretch anyway.
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 24,379
    I get the electric gears, but the electric pump is just pure lazy... a bit like taking a lift to go down one floor (which many of my jelly bodied colleagues do)
  • wobblebobwobblebob Posts: 19
    fenix said:

    Has anyone got the fumpa pump for out on the road ? I'd just be worried about the battery not being full enough when I need it.
    And a pump seems easier.

    I have a mini fumpa. Got it last October and has been used in anger 4 or 5 times since then either by me or club mates. Never had any battery issues, gets charged after every use and plug it in once a week or so when I remember just to make sure it keeps topped up. When I do that the light goes out after a couple of minutes so I think it's holding charge pretty well. Definitely easier than a pump though, just push it onto the valve, press the button and hold it until you're done. Only slight downside is no pressure guage, but my previous mini pumps didn't have one either so not really losing anything.
  • 50x1150x11 Posts: 55

    I get the electric gears, but the electric pump is just pure lazy... a bit like taking a lift to go down one floor (which many of my jelly bodied colleagues do)

    Many a pro will take the lift one floor over the stairs.


    Has anyone considered the OP might have an issue meaning a track pump isn't useable?
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 24,379
    50x11 said:




    Has anyone considered the OP might have an issue meaning a track pump isn't useable?

    no

  • shortfallshortfall Posts: 2,182
    edited 2 July
    There's some inventions that are just a no brainer like cordless screwdrivers, nail guns, fuel injection, and smartphones. Then there's pointless tech that's more expensive than what it replaces to no real advantage.
    Electric carving knives.
    Propelling pencils.
    Electronic bite detectors for fishing.
    Battery powered window squeegees.

    I put Di2 somewhere between the two. There are some small advantages to some people but not at a price point that would tempt me yet. I have mechanical gears that I select with a small movement of my finger or thumb. It's virtually faultless, it's effortless and requires me to twist a barrel adjuster a quarter of a turn once a flood to keep it in perfect working order. So very similar to it's electronic cousin. Buy what you want.



  • reaperactualreaperactual Posts: 293
    edited 2 July
    N.A.S.A. invested $100,000's developing a pen that writes in zero gravity, the Russians use a pencil.
  • focuszing723focuszing723 Posts: 757
    A common misconception states that, faced with the fact that ball-point pens would not write in zero-gravity, the Fisher Space Pen was devised as the result of millions of dollars of unnecessary spending on NASA's part when the Soviet Union took the simpler and cheaper route of just using pencils. In reality, the space pen was independently developed by Paul C. Fisher, founder of the Fisher Pen Company, with $1 million of his own funds. NASA tested and approved the pen for space use, then purchased 400 pens at $6 per pen. The Soviet Union subsequently also purchased the space pen for its Soyuz spaceflights.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Writing_in_space

    Twenty two squids on Amazon and it writes over grease!
  • reaperactualreaperactual Posts: 293
    edited 2 July
    Wow, thanks for that information, and a link too! I will be sure to pass this fascinating fact on to my friends during our next ride. 👏👍
  • focuszing723focuszing723 Posts: 757
    No probs. The Internets like well-mazing!
  • reaperactualreaperactual Posts: 293
    I was just about to write on some zero gravity grease and I thought to myself why hasn't anyone invented a pen for this, can you send me the Amazon link? 😂
  • sungodsungod Posts: 12,301
    edited 2 July
    i had one around moon landing time, long lost though

    pencils in zero g are a bad idea, when a tip snaps there are multiple hazards - its conductivity risks causing malfunction/damage if it gets into the guts of the capsule, and injury to eyes or by inhalation - once safety engineering kicked in they weren't used
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • pilot_petepilot_pete Posts: 1,869
    edited 8 July

    Has anyone considered the OP might have an issue meaning a track pump isn't useable?

    What, like no arms and legs? :D

    PP

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