Forum home Road cycling forum Road buying advice

Clipless Pedal Recommendations

I have returned to my road bike, a Giant Defy 3, after a 3 year gap and am loving riding it again. I never rode clipless previously but friends i am riding with at the moment are suggesting I go clipless and i thing its time i took the plunge.

One the reasons I have returned to the bike is about 4 months ago it was confirmed I have arthritis on both hips. Squash my real passion will almost certainly end after lock-down and running, while do-able, is sometimes a struggle.

However correctly seated on the bike cycling is pretty much same as it ever was.... (no singing)..... I am not quick about 15mph average casual and 17-18mph with effort. Rides of 25-40 miles 3 or 4 times a week preferred, as I am also pretty inflexible across the shoulders e.g I can not get down on the bars - I ride on the top of the bars.

I like the look of Shimano SPD (i think the flat side will give me some reassurance), but its the twisting to clipping out with dodgy hips that concerns me. I would appreciate any first timer recommendations you can give on pedals and shoes.

Thanks very much

Posts

  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 24,367
    Shimano SPD are the easiest to clip out of, so I would recommend those, maybe a double sided one, like the XT ones. You can undo the tiny allen bolt at the rear to make unclipping effortless. I don't think there is much hip action involved, you ar really just rotating the heel a few degrees. Likewise, an inexpensive pair of Shimano XC 31 shoes or equivalent will be perfect
  • oxomanoxoman Posts: 7,483
    Firstly you may be better with double sided spd pedals as easier to clip into as you move off. You can get spd,s that resemble normal mtb style flat pedals. I have both and found the double sided one's easier at the start. The single sided don't always hang in the right position to clip straight into. The spring tension is adjustable so you can make it easier to clip in and out. The knack for clipping in and out is to turn your ankle, this becomes second nature to be honest. With regards footwear I'd recommend you get something with recessed cleats as I found them easier than flat soles shoes to clip in with. Recessed cleats are also a lot easier to walk in.
    https://www.evanscycles.com/shimano-m520-spd-pedals-00120382
    https://www.evanscycles.com/shimano-m424-spd-mtb-pedals-00102712
    https://www.evanscycles.com/fwe-touring-single-sided-pedals-shimano-spd-EV330850
    Too many bikes according to Mrs O.
  • N0bodyOfTheGoatN0bodyOfTheGoat Posts: 4,065
    I bought a pair of https://www.merlincycles.com/time-xpro-10-road-pedals-112782.html as my first venture into 3-bolt shoes/pedals, plenty of float there to protect my knees, just like my old 2-bolt ATAC XS Carbons.
    ================
    2017 Cube Attain GTC Pro Disc 2016
    2016 Voodoo Wazoo
  • mr.b-campagmr.b-campag Posts: 217
    edited 28 June
    I know you've asked for recommendations, but are you sure you really need them (genuine question)? On the plus side you will have the 'look' and a tiny improvement in power transfer (that by the type of riding you appear to be doing will be unoticable). If your rides with your mates include the odd sprint for a town sign then it is probably safer to do it in clipless pedals too. Otoh you have a pre-existing medical condition that this might (or might not) exacerbate and are incurring a cost that is probably unnecessary, unless you are intending to progress to more serious riding that what you have described here. There's also a pretty good chance that when you first use them you will have an off until the release process becomes instinctive. With your issue that increased likelihood might be worth bearing in mind. Walking in cycling shoes wtih cleats is also a pita and potentially another place where you increase your risk of falling over (though likely much better with spds).

    Assuming you've already thought through all that then I'd recommend Time pedals, which allow a large degree of float and are easy to disengage. Just be careful as some of them have very sharp edges (e.g. my xpresso 8s)!
  • bompingtonbompington Posts: 7,110
    I've used SPD-SL for years now. No problems right up to my hip replacement, no problems straight after.
  • singletonsingleton Posts: 1,568
    I use Shimano SPD and SL and both good for me.
    I understand that speedplay offers more float - which might or might not be a consideration for you.
Sign In or Register to comment.