Robust hub to build a wheel around

curium99
curium99 Posts: 20
I need another rear wheel. The cassette has chewed the splines of the hub body which makes it difficult to remove and causes awful squealing in certain gears.

It's my commuting road bike. I want something that has a good 32h hub that won't need regular truing.

Am I better buying off the peg or getting a build done.

Budget ~ £200 - £300

Cheers

Comments

  • reaperactual
    reaperactual Posts: 1,185
    edited June 2020
    If you want durable, quality and strength take a look at the Hope Pro 4 hub with a steel freehub body. Only costs around £100

    The hubs come in 32 hole and the steel freehub won't get chewed by the cassette and comes in road standard width.
  • ugo.santalucia
    ugo.santalucia Posts: 28,230
    Not clear if it's the budget for the hubs only... as above, Hope PRO 4 with a steel freehub is what I have and it's the most robust and durable hub out there
    left the forum March 2023
  • dangardner27
    dangardner27 Posts: 118
    Surely for that money a Royce Venus is what you want, not the Hope?
  • ugo.santalucia
    ugo.santalucia Posts: 28,230

    Surely for that money a Royce Venus is what you want, not the Hope?

    In theory I do like the small manufacturing workshop, the precision engineering and all... but over the years I had more troubles out of the 3-4 Royce hubs that I handled than the 100+ Hope hubs that I built
    left the forum March 2023
  • dangardner27
    dangardner27 Posts: 118
    You can't argue with that. There you go Hope it is then for my next build, hope that helps the OP too.
  • curium99
    curium99 Posts: 20

    Not clear if it's the budget for the hubs only... as above, Hope PRO 4 with a steel freehub is what I have and it's the most robust and durable hub out there

    Budget was for the whole wheel. Either to buy a hub to have a wheel built around or recommend a wheel off the peg in that price range.

    My commuting bike uses rim-brakes.

    Do Hope make hubs for non-disc wheels?

    Cheers all.
  • ugo.santalucia
    ugo.santalucia Posts: 28,230
    Yes, it does... RS 4... bit pricey though
    left the forum March 2023
  • yellowv2
    yellowv2 Posts: 282
    Miche from CycleClinic?
  • ugo.santalucia
    ugo.santalucia Posts: 28,230
    Or a Shimano 105/Ultegra... they both have steel freehubs that don't dent (unlike the Miche mentioned above)
    left the forum March 2023
  • shortfall
    shortfall Posts: 3,288
    I have Miche Primato hubs on 2 sets of wheels and my freehubs haven't suffered indentations. I'm guessing as he's a wheelbuilder Ugo has seen a lot more freehubs than I have but I've only got good things to say about Miche.
  • thecycleclinic
    thecycleclinic Posts: 395
    edited June 2020
    Miche hubs have alloy freehubs. I know what is am about to write may seem controversial to some or ride or even arrogant but it's not. It's a fact. Some things in this world are not opinion this is one of them. Alloy freehub dont notch to the point that cassettes are hard to remove if the lockring is torqued enough. Without question every notched freehub I have seem has had a lockring that's not done up tight enough. Without exception every complaint about notched freehubs I have come across has been from people who have not torque the lockring to 40 nm min. Those people are also adamant that they have done it tight enough. Theres nothing wrong with steel freehub mind but they are not intrinsically better. They allow for more lax cassettte fitting.

    You can torque a lockring to 50 nm. 60nm in fact if you dare. Hand tight is not enough. Some cassette lockrings I see are hand tight.

    The problem the op has is not his freehub. Its his toolset and the assumption he is making. Or she, let's not be assumptive.


    Notching happens if the sprockets can move relative to the lockring. If the sprockets can move and notch the freehub the lockring is not tight enough. It really is that simple. some people have said to me they dont like doing the lockring tight enough, it feels too tight. My reply is ride a fixed gear then or pay a mechanic who is comfortable using a torque wrench to do the job. No point in beating about the Bush is there.

    Some may think this rude
    It is however honest. If your blaming the kit before your skills then there is little help that can be offered.

    There is nothing wrong with steel freehub bodies and there nothing wrong with aluminium ones.
    In both cases lockring must be done to 40 to 50nm. It not only prevents notching but ensures the correct sprocket spacing. That last bit should be of interest to everyone.

    The op needs a new freehub and a good torque wrench. That cheaper than a new wheel.

    Also a miche cassette which use thicker steel sprockets and thinner spacers notch even less than shimano sprockets.

    Shimano use steel or titanium freehubs so they have made there cassettes with that in mind. They have used thinner sprockets to save weight. Thiner sprockets put more stress on a freehub so if it's not held by the lockring properly it will start to notch at a lower load. However shimno cassettes on miche or other alloy freehubs with the lockring done to 40 to 50 nm still dont notch much at all.

    My mtb 11 speed cassette for example has not notched my alloy freehub.

    I have little time for those that blame the kit before there skills.

    If you dont use a torque wrench then yes use a steel freehub, that's the right choice but it not because there anything wrong with an alumium freehub, but it your choice not to buy good tools. That's why shimano use steel freehubs, they know what there customers are like.

    To answer the ops question finally then a shimano hub is the right answer. That's tiagra rs400 or r7000 to stick to the budget. Nothing wrong with these hubs and nothing wrong with 32 spoke wheels. They are quite good.

    Sadly not every shop mechanic uses atorque wrench either.

    Also if you all used campagnolo hubs this discussion would not even be a thing. The tall splines are a better design.
    www.thecycleclinic.co.uk
  • thecycleclinic
    thecycleclinic Posts: 395
    edited June 2020
    Steel freehubs have one other advantage. If they ha e replaceable bearings the body itself is more amenable to having bearings pushed out and pressed back in again. Alloy freehub are in theory serviceable but require more care or a design where both bearing are pressed in only a short distance.
    www.thecycleclinic.co.uk
  • reaperactual
    reaperactual Posts: 1,185
    edited June 2020

    Miche hubs have alloy freehubs. I know what is am about to write may seem controversial to some or ride or even arrogant but it's not. It's a fact. Some things in this world are not opinion this is one of them. Alloy freehub dont notch to the point that cassettes are hard to remove if the lockring is torqued enough. Without question every notched freehub I have seem has had a lockring that's not done up tight enough. Without exception every complaint about notched freehubs I have come across has been from people who have not torque the lockring to 40 nm min. Those people are also adamant that they have done it tight enough. Theres nothing wrong with steel freehub mind but they are not intrinsically better. They allow for more lax cassettte fitting.

    You can torque a lockring to 50 nm. 60nm in fact if you dare. Hand tight is not enough. Some cassette lockrings I see are hand tight.

    The problem the op has is not his freehub. Its his toolset and the assumption he is making. Or she, let's not be assumptive.


    Notching happens if the sprockets can move relative to the lockring. If the sprockets can move and notch the freehub the lockring is not tight enough. It really is that simple. some people have said to me they dont like doing the lockring tight enough, it feels too tight. My reply is ride a fixed gear then or pay a mechanic who is comfortable using a torque wrench to do the job. No point in beating about the Bush is there.

    Some may think this rude
    It is however honest. If your blaming the kit before your skills then there is little help that can be offered.

    There is nothing wrong with steel freehub bodies and there nothing wrong with aluminium ones.
    In both cases lockring must be done to 40 to 50nm. It not only prevents notching but ensures the correct sprocket spacing. That last bit should be of interest to everyone.

    The op needs a new freehub and a good torque wrench. That cheaper than a new wheel.

    Also a miche cassette which use thicker steel sprockets and thinner spacers notch even less than shimano sprockets.

    Shimano use steel or titanium freehubs so they have made there cassettes with that in mind. They have used thinner sprockets to save weight. Thiner sprockets put more stress on a freehub so if it's not held by the lockring properly it will start to notch at a lower load. However shimno cassettes on miche or other alloy freehubs with the lockring done to 40 to 50 nm still dont notch much at all.

    My mtb 11 speed cassette for example has not notched my alloy freehub.

    I have little time for those that blame the kit before there skills.

    If you dont use a torque wrench then yes use a steel freehub, that's the right choice but it not because there anything wrong with an alumium freehub, but it your choice not to buy good tools. That's why shimano use steel freehubs, they know what there customers are like.

    To answer the ops question finally then a shimano hub is the right answer. That's tiagra rs400 or r7000 to stick to the budget. Nothing wrong with these hubs and nothing wrong with 32 spoke wheels. They are quite good.

    Sadly not every shop mechanic uses atorque wrench either.

    Also if you all used campagnolo hubs this discussion would not even be a thing. The tall splines are a better design.

    Controversial perhaps, arrogant perhaps, but not fact! I have an automotive torque wrench, bought specifically for cassette tightening and bb's.




    I torqued my cassette lockring up to 45Nm and the alloy freehub still got notched to the point cassette was difficult to get off after 8 months use. That's why I only use steel freehubs.

    Is my alloy freehub experience opinion, non factual or an exception to the rule?
  • shortfall
    shortfall Posts: 3,288

    Miche hubs have alloy freehubs. I know what is am about to write may seem controversial to some or ride or even arrogant but it's not. It's a fact. Some things in this world are not opinion this is one of them. Alloy freehub dont notch to the point that cassettes are hard to remove if the lockring is torqued enough. Without question every notched freehub I have seem has had a lockring that's not done up tight enough. Without exception every complaint about notched freehubs I have come across has been from people who have not torque the lockring to 40 nm min. Those people are also adamant that they have done it tight enough. Theres nothing wrong with steel freehub mind but they are not intrinsically better. They allow for more lax cassettte fitting.

    You can torque a lockring to 50 nm. 60nm in fact if you dare. Hand tight is not enough. Some cassette lockrings I see are hand tight.

    The problem the op has is not his freehub. Its his toolset and the assumption he is making. Or she, let's not be assumptive.


    Notching happens if the sprockets can move relative to the lockring. If the sprockets can move and notch the freehub the lockring is not tight enough. It really is that simple. some people have said to me they dont like doing the lockring tight enough, it feels too tight. My reply is ride a fixed gear then or pay a mechanic who is comfortable using a torque wrench to do the job. No point in beating about the Bush is there.

    Some may think this rude
    It is however honest. If your blaming the kit before your skills then there is little help that can be offered.

    There is nothing wrong with steel freehub bodies and there nothing wrong with aluminium ones.
    In both cases lockring must be done to 40 to 50nm. It not only prevents notching but ensures the correct sprocket spacing. That last bit should be of interest to everyone.

    The op needs a new freehub and a good torque wrench. That cheaper than a new wheel.

    Also a miche cassette which use thicker steel sprockets and thinner spacers notch even less than shimano sprockets.

    Shimano use steel or titanium freehubs so they have made there cassettes with that in mind. They have used thinner sprockets to save weight. Thiner sprockets put more stress on a freehub so if it's not held by the lockring properly it will start to notch at a lower load. However shimno cassettes on miche or other alloy freehubs with the lockring done to 40 to 50 nm still dont notch much at all.

    My mtb 11 speed cassette for example has not notched my alloy freehub.

    I have little time for those that blame the kit before there skills.

    If you dont use a torque wrench then yes use a steel freehub, that's the right choice but it not because there anything wrong with an alumium freehub, but it your choice not to buy good tools. That's why shimano use steel freehubs, they know what there customers are like.

    To answer the ops question finally then a shimano hub is the right answer. That's tiagra rs400 or r7000 to stick to the budget. Nothing wrong with these hubs and nothing wrong with 32 spoke wheels. They are quite good.

    Sadly not every shop mechanic uses atorque wrench either.

    Also if you all used campagnolo hubs this discussion would not even be a thing. The tall splines are a better design.

    Controversial perhaps, arrogant perhaps, but not fact! I have an automotive torque wrench, bought specifically for cassette tightening and bb's.




    I torqued my cassette lockring up to 45Nm and the alloy freehub still got notched to the point cassette was difficult to get off after 8 months use. That's why I only use steel freehubs.

    Is my alloy freehub experience opinion, non factual or an exception to the rule?
    Are you on Campag or Shimano? Maybe the smaller splines with Shimano are more prone to notching due to reduced surface area?
  • reaperactual
    reaperactual Posts: 1,185
    edited June 2020
    Shimano. Mtb 11-34 cassette, Gears 1-7 one piece pinned block, 8,9 and lockring separate.

    I'm a spinner not a stomper, average normal use.

    Torque wrench calibrated, always stored on minimal torque setting, warmed up torque mechanism first, treated with care and never dropped or abused.

    No such issue with my new steel freehub. Other Freehub was the problem because it was made of alloy.

    I've seen alloy freehub designs with small steel inserts on one of the splines, hacks to insert a paper clip into a spline to stop cassettes chewing alloy freehub, all these hacks and expense for R&D because end user can't be trusted to tighten a lockring?
  • ugo.santalucia
    ugo.santalucia Posts: 28,230
    Campagnolo splines don't get dented, they are much deeper.

    Torque or not, most people don't own a torque wrench, or they don't own one calibrated for that range of torque, so it's simpler to just get a steel hub, rather than having to pay money to a shop to fit a cassette or pay money to buy a tool that will be used once or twice per year. Decent tools are expensive and cheap tools are as good as not having them at all.
    left the forum March 2023
  • curium99
    curium99 Posts: 20

    However shimno cassettes on miche or other alloy freehubs with the lockring done to 40 to 50 nm still dont notch much at all.

    This is the first time I've ever had this issue. I think I'll stick with steel.