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Clipless for weight loss.

How do everyone 😊

So, iv started cycling again after a 10 stone weight loss. I bought a marin pine 1 mtb that come with the awkward pedal cages... Aparently they were big before my time 😂😂. Because I'm putting in as many miles as I can on the bike to further lose more weight, Im now considering clipless pedals as opposed to the cages. Just wondering if anyone knows if your legs get more or less of a workout with clipless? Iv found so much contradictory info saying clipless is best workout wise than flat.... Vise versa.

Anyone have any advice/info they could give me? It'll be much appreciated 😊

Sam

Posts

  • You "can" get more of a workout with clipless pedals if you learn the technique of pulling up with your trailing leg.

    Do it properly and you are working on both the up and down strokes. It takes time to learn it properly and mental discipline to keep doing it.

    You will go somewhat faster as well. Excellent technique for time trials.
  • You "can" get more of a workout with clipless pedals if you learn the technique of pulling up with your trailing leg.

    Do it properly and you are working on both the up and down strokes. It takes time to learn it properly and mental discipline to keep doing it.

    You will go somewhat faster as well. Excellent technique for time trials.

    Brilliant! Thanks @Darius_Jedburgh 👍👍
  • oxomanoxoman Posts: 9,300
    As above but I will add the following. Set spring tension low to start with to make including easier. Learn to unclip in time for stopping and also I will unclip a foot if I'm about to attempt something harder than normal on the trail. Also go SPD s would be my choice.
    Too many bikes according to Mrs O.
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    There's not going to be a difference in losing weight but clipless is better. I prefer the Time Atac pedals. Bombproof.

    Just get out and have fun.
  • oxoman said:

    As above but I will add the following. Set spring tension low to start with to make including easier. Learn to unclip in time for stopping and also I will unclip a foot if I'm about to attempt something harder than normal on the trail. Also go SPD s would be my choice.

    +1
  • bompingtonbompington Posts: 7,674

    You "can" get more of a workout with clipless pedals if you learn the technique of pulling up with your trailing leg.

    Do it properly and you are working on both the up and down strokes. It takes time to learn it properly and mental discipline to keep doing it.

    You will go somewhat faster as well. Excellent technique for time trials.

    Uh-oh... can of worms alert... there is, errr, some discussion to be had on all that kind of thing. Let's just say that even the power benefits of clipless pedals are questionable.

    But practically every cyclist who has ever used them will tell you that it feels better, and so in the long run you will tend to ride more (the same principle in mirror image to the one that says that you are not actually likely to train better by riding a bike with the brakes on - in theory you would use more energy, in practice you just give up).

    Weight loss (and btw congrats on yours) depends on using more calories than you consume: riding more is likely to help.

    And if you try clipless, you will fall over at first.
  • steve_sordysteve_sordy Posts: 2,259
    edited June 2020
    I have seen no evidence that clipless pedals offer any weight reduction potential at all. It is more important that you get the miles and the hours in and enjoying doing so. If you like experimenting with new kit, then great go ahead, but don't do it because you think you might lose a few more ounces per ride - you won't!

    However, if you decide to give clipless pedals a go, commit yourself to persisting for at least three months. You WILL have lots of comedy falls, when you stop and then fail to unclip. You may have a few serious falls when you fail to unclip as well.

    But also consider using proper spiked flat pedals and proper MTB flat shoes. Their grip is extremely good and if you angle your foot, you can pull the pedal up!

    I started with trainers and open framed metal pedals that I believe are called bear traps. They were a significant upgrade from the slippy rubber ones that come with budget bikes. From those I went straight to SPDs and the associated shoes. I stuck with them for 18 months, but it was a 3-day ride in the Yorkshire Dales that exposed my lack of skill. I came back from that miserable, bloody and bruising experience and bought some proper flat pedals and some FiveTen Lowrider shoes. WOW! the grip was amazing and I never looked at SPDs again. My falling off rate declined considerably too. :)
  • loltorideloltoride Posts: 416
    I cant see how they help with weight loss I use clipless trail pedals they certainly help when I am flying but any technical section I one foot comes right out. Personally I find anytime on the bike helps with training.
    So Far!
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