Forum home Road cycling forum Workshop

Ultra Torque Bearings

shortfallshortfall Posts: 3,287
Had my LBS replace my Record UT bearings last year as the originals had gone rough after 5 years and many thousands of miles. However the new ones are already noisy and I decided to have a go at the job myself. I've got them out and the shop replaced the originals with SKS 7149783 which are the 2 rubber seals type. I want to replace them with a good quality bearing that aren't going to be silly money. Campagnolo items can be had from circa £20 but if anyone can recommend a size and type that I can get from my local Bearing Factors I'd be grateful. Not fussed if it's ceramic, hybrid or steel as long as it's of good quality.
Also looking for a ghetto solution to drifting them back on the semi axles without having to purchase an expensive propriety tool. Looks like a piece of steel tube will do using the old bearings to protect the new ones as they are tapped in. Anyone done this?.

Thanks.

Posts

  • bcmfbcmf Posts: 25
    Its hard to get a generic bearing from a bearing supplier as the width of the race is 6mm and most generic bearings are 7mm.
    However Enduro do a version and I replaced my original UT bearings with these and am very happy.
    http://www.wychbearings.co.uk/co-6805n-vv-zero_ceramic-enduro.html.

    As for refitting try and seat the bearings in the cups on the frame as evenly as possible and install the crank without wavy washer and tighten up.Then remove the cranks and put on the circlip on the driveside crank arm and the wavy washer on NDS and install.
  • shortfallshortfall Posts: 3,287
    Are you meaning to use the nut that joins the 2 semi axles to tighten up and seat the bearings? If so I hadn't thought of that but in the mean time I've found a piece of tubing in the garage that's the correct diameter which I can drift the new bearings on and use the old ones to protect them as I tap them on.
  • Ben6899Ben6899 Posts: 8,963
    Out of interest, did the old bearings come off easily?
    Ben

    Bikes: Donhou DSS4 Custom | Condor Italia RC | Gios Megalite | Dolan Preffisio | Giant Bowery '76
    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ben_h_ppcc/
    Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
  • shortfallshortfall Posts: 3,287
    Yes Ben. There was a tiny bit of rusty looking gunk in amongst the grease which was obviously water ingress, but the bearings came off pretty easily with the puller. Getting the retaining clip off proved a lot more difficult than in the video tutorial though I have to say.
  • Ben6899Ben6899 Posts: 8,963
    Thanks for the reply, mate. I'm handy with my own maintenance, but UT bearings (on two of my bikes) I have always left to my LBS.

    Let us know how it goes, drifting the new ones into place and I might start doing this job myself.
    Ben

    Bikes: Donhou DSS4 Custom | Condor Italia RC | Gios Megalite | Dolan Preffisio | Giant Bowery '76
    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ben_h_ppcc/
    Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
  • joe2019joe2019 Posts: 1,222
    Always replaced UT bearings myself, easy job with the correct bearing remover.

    Once I couldn't find the tube to bang them back down, and, yes, I used a piece of tube.


  • shortfallshortfall Posts: 3,287
    edited June 2020
    Mission accomplished. Bought some steel bearings from Aire Velo in Stanningley Leeds for £13, tapped them in with a piece of hollow curtain rail tube and the old bearing for protection and bolted it all back together. I'd been averse to doing the job myself previously due to the requirement for some pricey tools (even the Park kit is about £100) but given that the LBS charged me £60 for replacements that lasted only a year I decided to have a go myself with the aid of YouTube. I had a bearing puller in the garage so all it cost me was the price of the bearings. Aire Velo do some hybrid ceramic jobbies but they're £40 the pair which I thought was a bit steep although I might try them next time if the steel ones aren't all that.


  • Ben6899Ben6899 Posts: 8,963
    What brand puller is that? And do you use a torque wrench to nip up the hirth joint? Or just a substantial 10mm Allen key?

    Good to see you're all sorted.
    Ben

    Bikes: Donhou DSS4 Custom | Condor Italia RC | Gios Megalite | Dolan Preffisio | Giant Bowery '76
    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ben_h_ppcc/
    Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
  • shortfallshortfall Posts: 3,287
    Don't know the brand tbh, it's one I inherited off my dad. I think you'll get one off Screwfix or eBay for a reasonable price. Torque values are given for the hirth joint but I guess you could just do it up tight or borrow your mates as I did 😀
  • shortfallshortfall Posts: 3,287
    Forgot to add, the Campagnolo video doesn't show this but other ones recommend putting a good splurge of waterproof grease in the cups before installation. As mine showed signs of water ingress I stuck some in on the precautionary principle.
  • Ben6899Ben6899 Posts: 8,963
    Nice one. Ta!
    Ben

    Bikes: Donhou DSS4 Custom | Condor Italia RC | Gios Megalite | Dolan Preffisio | Giant Bowery '76
    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ben_h_ppcc/
    Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
  • thecycleclinicthecycleclinic Posts: 394
    edited June 2020
    Had issue with aire velo bearings. Ntn bearings from them failed quickly.

    In any case you dont seat the bearings on the axles by drawing the two halves of the crank arms together with the bolt. That can cause damage.

    A steel tube can and does seat the bearings well if it's the right diameter.

    A hammer however is not the best tools for setting them. The cyclus tools I have seat the bearing with a press I.eno shock load.

    It's difficult to tell if your chosen method has caused any damage or not but one thing I do know not many shops ha e the tight tools. The shop that did the job last year may have done the same as you. Bearing damage and early failure is certainly possible.



    www.thecycleclinic.co.uk
Sign In or Register to comment.