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Rockshox Deluxe Select+ on high speed chatter

So I've had a Whyte S-150crs V2 for a few months now and I am finding the rear Rockshox Deluxe Select+ too harsh for my liking (although this is my first full suspension so I don't have much to compare it to).

Drops it handles fine, but high speed chatter like brake bumps absolutely rattle my bike and my body.

Is there anything I can do to make this handle high speed chatter better? Or should I just toughen up and slam through it? haha.

I've tried 20%, 25% and 30% sag. Although not back to back, so hard to tell what different it makes, maybe I will try back to back this weekend when I get more time.

I haven't changed the volume reducers at all, I could be wrong but I don't think this bike comes with any as the linkage is already pretty progressive, but I should double check that.

My rebound has been roughly just over half towards the fast side.

Posts

  • steve_sordysteve_sordy Posts: 2,028
    First thing is your tyre pressures. Tyres are your first line of suspension, it is all people had before forks and shocks were invented. Maybe your pressures are too high? You will be astonished at the difference this can make.
    Read this link, watch the video and go try it on something bumpy/chattery.

    https://www.pinkbike.com/news/Tech-Tuesday-tire-pressure-2011.html

    When you find tyre pressures you like, write them down so that you can set them to that pressure every time. I use the Topeak D2 digital pressure gauge. I've had it for years and years.

    Once you have the tyres sorted, time for the suspension.

    On a bike like yours I would start with 30% sag on fork and shock, set up as described in the link at the bottom of this post. Set the rebound one third away from fast. If you have low speed compression damping set it on low/open. If you have levers with pedal, trail, open, choose open.

    Do not be afraid to experiment. Take your shock pump with you and also paper and a pencil. Write down all the settings at the start, psi in the fork, psi in the shock, rebound settings etc
    Ride a section that gives you trouble and then start altering stuff, one thing at a time. Leave the %sag alone for the time being. Start by altering the rebound setting on the end that feels the harshest (fork or shock) and make the rebound damping slower. Ride again. Once you find a setting you like write it down and move on to the next and so on. It can be a bit laborious if you have never done it before. You may even need to experiment to find out which way to turn the knob to get slow or fast rebound damping. It may be a bit slow, but the big advantage is that you will quickly discover what the dials and knobs all do for the bike's ride.

    This is a fantastic link to setting suspension by Bike Rumour, but it may contain more than you can absorb or even need right now. But read it and do what it says, it really is good (not just my opinion).
    https://bikerumor.com/2014/10/30/bikerumor-suspension-setup-series-full-series-pdf-free-download/

    There are short cuts to finding adequate suspension settings. The fork or shock manufacturer often has an app that will give target settings if you enter the serial number of the shock/fork and your riding weight. But these are target settings, some riders find them OK, I don't. There are "ten minutes to perfect suspension" YouTube videos. They may get you close, but you want better, right? :)
    Remember, start with tyre pressure!
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