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I'm getting on in years looking for some expertise

Hi all I’m new to the forum, I haven’t been riding for a while..I tend to change my exercise routines..but like everyone I get bored...
So now I’m looking for another bike...berittet than my last one which was heavy...had knobbly tyres..flat bars but a triple set.......I found it very hard work up the hills around here ...

However....I got fairly fit quickly...so at nearly 70...I’m looking for something that will be easier to ...ride and...to be honest fairly cheap...I’ve seen a Vitus...with a triple set 28t 38t 50t Campaq velocity group set....
It’s Alloy ..looks in good nick and at £150..fits the price range....

I don’t understand the gearing but my question is I suppose...will it get me up hills better that that heavy beast I had.......can it be improved???

Sorry for my long post

Ray

Posts

  • arlowoodarlowood Posts: 2,520
    With no information about which model of Vitus you refer to I'm making a few assumptions.
    A quick search suggests that it may be a Vitus Alios with a Campag 8-speed (or possibly 9 speed cassette). The cassette will probably have a 27 or 29 tooth sprocket as the largest. With the triple chainset having a 28 tooth inner ring then your lowest gear will be 28/27 or 28/29 or effectively a 1:1 ratio. Even at your age that ratio should get you up almost any hill if you are fit enough. I'm approaching 76 and ride a bike with a 34/32 lowest gear but I find that I can climb most gradients on 34/28 ( a ratio of 1:1.2 - a slightly harder gear than a 1:1).

    The most important thing will be tyres. Your previous knobbly tryes would be the most problematic for normal road riding. get some 25mm road tyres and you will definitely feel a difference.

    Your £150 budget is a bit limiting so if you could stretch that a bit then your choice will be much wider in terms of getting a good second hand bike
  • singletonsingleton Posts: 1,923
    edited May 2020
    Hi Ray,
    Gearing is physics / maths and is basically about the ratio between the front gear and the rear gear.
    The pedals turn the front gear, which pulls the chain, which turns the rear gear and you move forward.
    This essentially creates the link between the pedal rotation and the rear wheel rotation.
    If you have LESS teeth on the front gear, it gets easier to pedal.
    Conversely, if you have MORE teeth on the rear gear, it gets easier to pedal.

    Road bikes, generally don't have a gear that is easier than 1:1, unless you live somewhere very hilly, that should be okay.
    You say that you have 28t on the front, so if you have 28t or more on the back then that will give you a 1:1 ratio - or if you have a 30t or a 32t on the back then it will give you an even easier / lower gear. It's usually easier to change the rear cassette than the front chainset.

    A lighter bike will also make it easier to climb hills and a bike with efficient tyres will make it easier.
  • I'm not far off your age and my winter bike has 34/28 bottom gear and will get up all my local hills. But if you are starting from scratch I would advise not going up the biggest hills you can find until you've got a bit more experienced.
    My summer bike came with 34/34 bottom gear and that will get me round long days in Lakes, Dales and Peak District. The lower gear helps me not to burn myself out, but on 80 to 100 mile rides I'm just being over cautious.

    I'm not sure that you will need a triple on the front if I read your aims correctly.

    You may well find that you soon outgrow this first bike and will want to trade up....
    if you get the bug that we all have.
  • oxomanoxoman Posts: 9,302
    If the bike is ok and fits you then at the price offered you should be ok. When I say ok I mean it works no slipping gears or worn out sprockets, frame cracks etc. Another thing to look for is rim wear on the wheels, most wheels will have a wear mark it could be a dimple, groove either all the way around the rim or just across it, if it hasnt got anything try pressing in the rim braking area as hard as you can. Any softness or deflection is pointing to knackered rims and that's dangerous. Given it's a campag set up may point to the previous owner being a more experienced rider. Campag normally wears in and gets better with age and shimano wears out. With a triple set you should be able to get up anything once you get fitter. A roadbike will be a lot easier than a MTB both weight and rolling resistance wise. Remember most important thing after all of the above, age is but a number. I frequently ride with over 70,s who do 300km rides every so for fun. Pre lockdown. Finally welcome to the forum.
    Too many bikes according to Mrs O.
  • RayleesonRayleeson Posts: 12
    Thanks guys...as it happens..this bike may have gone....but.......I’m going to take on board all the comments ..I feel it’s all good advice ...in fairness that was more important to me so thanks all, great stuff...glad I asked.

    Ray
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