Tyre help

Afternoon! I have just bought a Vitus Energie VR cyclocross that I am thoroughly enjoying. I have only been out on a few rides so far. At somepoint I'm going to by a second wheel set so I can run off-road/gravel tyres and road tyres on the other set.

Right now, to get my fitness levels up I want to do road cycling on Dartmoor where i live. I currently have the Vee XCX, 700c x 33 tyres that the bike came with. They are quite nobbly, but they do fly along the road compared to what I'm used to (I always road mountain bikes). However I would like to get a pair of slicker road tyres. Thinking about 28mm.

How much improvement would I notice in terms of rolling resistance/efficiency? Should I get slicker tyres at 32mm? I do enjoy the comfort that the bigger tyres offer. I guess I want the optimum level of comfort v efficiency.

Any input would be greatly appreciated as road cycling is a new world to me!

Many thanks

Comments

  • N0bodyOfTheGoat
    N0bodyOfTheGoat Posts: 5,954
    Id be looking at maybe a 32mm GP5000 for the rear for comfort and then either a 25mm or 28mm for the front and a more aero transition from the rim sidewall to the tyre.
    ================
    2020 Voodoo Marasa
    2017 Cube Attain GTC Pro Disc 2016
    2016 Voodoo Wazoo
  • Id be looking at maybe a 32mm GP5000 for the rear for comfort and then either a 25mm or 28mm for the front and a more aero transition from the rim sidewall to the tyre.

    Id be looking at maybe a 32mm GP5000 for the rear for comfort and then either a 25mm or 28mm for the front and a more aero transition from the rim sidewall to the tyre.

    That's very interesting to have a bigger tyre on the back to maintain comfort. Is that quite a standard thing to do?
  • dj58
    dj58 Posts: 2,221
    It isn't the standard thing to do, however some people do it if there is sufficient clearance on the frame, to obtain more comfort on poor road surfaces. You will notice a difference if you switch to a slicker tread, 28c F/R or 28c F/32c R or 32c F/R if comfort is important to you, go for a tyre with a high TPI count. A lot of endurance road bikes come fitted with 28 - 32c tyres, though usually the same size F&R.