[solved] Tire keeps moving on the rim, destroying my valves

hansblaauw2000
hansblaauw2000 Posts: 7
edited May 2020 in Workshop


So the outer and inner tube go on the rim, and the valve is straight. I ride for a minute or 2, and the valve comes out looking like the photo i attached here. I’m pretty sure i installed this whole shabang the way vredestein wants you to correctly.
Any ideas as to what could be the cause of this, yall?
I have wrecked 2 inner tubes because of this because they were torn around the valve
I have walked 2 hours because of this

Comments

  • Please note that, in the photo, i think i had deflated the tire to take the pressure off. I don’t actually run that low tire pressure
  • peteco
    peteco Posts: 184
    I would:

    Check that you have right size inner tube (check the printed or embossed text on it) for the wheel.
    Check that you have the right size tyre for the wheel.
    Confirm what pressure you are using.

    I have only ever seen that when the pressure is way too low.

    That looks like a pretty chunky tread - what bike is it on ?

    Pete
  • racerex
    racerex Posts: 69
    Agree pressure is too low. Inflate enough to make sure the bead is seated properly all the way around and then let some air out if desired. Bead not seated will allow the tire to slip as soon as put some force on it.
  • ugo.santalucia
    ugo.santalucia Posts: 28,233
    What do you mean by nipple? You mean the air valve? Nipples are the bits that protrude from the rim and connect with the spokes
    left the forum March 2023
  • arlowood
    arlowood Posts: 2,561
    When you installed the tyre and tube did you make sure that the valve stem was pushed all the way in before you started inflating the tyre. If not then it's just possible that the base of the valve stem where it is bonded onto the inner tube is being trapped against one of the tyre beads thus causing the stem to be pushed off the vertical.

    My tyre/tube installation technique involves seating one bead of the tyre all the way onto the rim. Insert the valve stem through the hole and tuck the inner tube all the way round. Inflate the inner tube very slightly so that it is not flat. Push the valve stem into the rim as far as possible and mount the second tyre bead onto the rim at the valve. Make sure that the inner tube is not trapped anywhere at the valve and continue to seat the rest of the tyre around the rim. Once the tyre is on, apply a bit more air into the inner tube and go round the tyre checking there are no bits of inner tube trapped by the tyre bead. Once you're happy, inflate the tyre fully.

    Sorry if it sounds like teaching Grandma to suck eggs
  • Update: tried degreasing the rim and tire bead, some stuff came off but didn’t help
  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 25,709
    Just adding to the above....
    No mentioning of tightening up the nut. It looks very loose. 🤔
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • peteco
    peteco Posts: 184

    Update: tried degreasing the rim and tire bead, some stuff came off but didn’t help

    What pressure did you inflate the tyre to ?

    Pete

  • peteco said:

    Update: tried degreasing the rim and tire bead, some stuff came off but didn’t help

    What pressure did you inflate the tyre to ?

    Pete

    Don’t know, they were inflated to the point where if you squeeze them, the tire gives in just a bit
  • fenix
    fenix Posts: 5,437
    You need a track pump with a gauge. Best cycling investment.
  • arlowood said:

    When you installed the tyre and tube did you make sure that the valve stem was pushed all the way in before you started inflating the tyre. If not then it's just possible that the base of the valve stem where it is bonded onto the inner tube is being trapped against one of the tyre beads thus causing the stem to be pushed off the vertical.

    My tyre/tube installation technique involves seating one bead of the tyre all the way onto the rim. Insert the valve stem through the hole and tuck the inner tube all the way round. Inflate the inner tube very slightly so that it is not flat. Push the valve stem into the rim as far as possible and mount the second tyre bead onto the rim at the valve. Make sure that the inner tube is not trapped anywhere at the valve and continue to seat the rest of the tyre around the rim. Once the tyre is on, apply a bit more air into the inner tube and go round the tyre checking there are no bits of inner tube trapped by the tyre bead. Once you're happy, inflate the tyre fully.

    Sorry if it sounds like teaching Grandma to suck eggs

    Hi thanks for thinking along!
    You mean just moving the valve up and down twice before commencing to inflate?
  • peteco
    peteco Posts: 184

    peteco said:

    Update: tried degreasing the rim and tire bead, some stuff came off but didn’t help

    What pressure did you inflate the tyre to ?

    Pete

    Don’t know, they were inflated to the point where if you squeeze them, the tire gives in just a bit
    You need to get a tyre pressure gauge. Then inflate your tyres to just below the maximum shown on the tyre wall, and see if the problem re-occurs.
    Until you get the tyre pressure right, anything else you do to fix this is just guesswork.

    Pete
  • So the tire pressure can't be my problem, as i've actually ran it lower than this before without a problem. The only thing that started happening before this issue, is the fabric that's on the tire bead appears worn out. You can actually see it in the photo there's a bit of string hanging on there. I’ll get some new tire compound as i need some didicated trail stuff anyway, i’ll you all know if that changes anything
  • peteco
    peteco Posts: 184
    A bit of string like that is not unusual. If you don’t have a pressure gauge, then you don’t know if it was higher or lower than before.
    A gauge will be cheaper than new tyres.
    Pete
  • hansblaauw2000
    hansblaauw2000 Posts: 7
    edited May 2020


    Problem solved! So I didn’t get around to buying new tires (some stuff got in the way) so instead I stuck some ductape on the rim on both sides like the red lines shown in this image. Just one layer, for heavy use i’d say two layers is better
  • photonic69
    photonic69 Posts: 2,415
    Um, just to be clear you DID have rim tape already on your wheels?

    Picture for illustration only



    Sometimes. Maybe. Possibly.

  • fenix
    fenix Posts: 5,437
    They do say duct tape fixes most things.
  • s_j_pwmb
    s_j_pwmb Posts: 75
    I may be too late to this thread, but I had the same problem and got through three tubes on a ride as the tyre kept slipping and causing rips around the valve stem. The problem was old rim tape which was loose on the rim bed. A new rim tape solved the problem completely.