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Snapped and stuck barrel adjuster

darrell1967darrell1967 Posts: 455
edited May 2020 in Workshop
As the title says,
I’ve got a 2010 carbon Specialized Tarmac that I’m building into a commuter but I’ve managed to snap both of the barrel adjusters in the down-tube boss. I’ve tried to tap them and drill them out and it ain’t going well. One of the bosses is a bit wobbly/loose.

What are my options here?
Is there a kind of band that I can do a restomod affair? Can the bosses be replaced?

I don’t want to ditch the frame.

TIA.

Posts

  • You are not the first. There is a long thread recently on this. A quick search will find it.
  • darrell1967darrell1967 Posts: 455
    Thanks for the reply but I’ve tried 2 or 3 different ways to get the snapped adjusters out and they won’t have it.

    I’m wondering where I can go next.

    I’ve used the search facility here and the only info I can find is how to remove snapped adjusters. It’s a bit late for that.
  • lesfirthlesfirth Posts: 1,356
    Is the adjuster bit riveted to to the frame? If so drilling out the rivets and replacing the adjuster could be a possibility.
  • darrell1967darrell1967 Posts: 455
    lesfirth said:

    Is the adjuster bit riveted to to the frame? If so drilling out the rivets and replacing the adjuster could be a possibility.

    Yes it is and with what look like small rivets.

    Drilling out the rivets and replacing the adjuster would be my choice but I don’t know how carbon frames are put together. Is there a plate on the inside of the tube to which the adjuster is riveted to? I can’t imagine the adjuster being riveted straight to the carbon itself.
  • monty_dogcpmonty_dogcp Posts: 382
    If you can drill the rivets, remove the old ones and get some replacements from Ceeway: https://www.framebuilding.com/Aluminum Aluminium Alloy Titanium.htm
  • MootsboyMootsboy Posts: 10
    I would carefully drill out the rivets and then you will have access to drill & re-tap the adjuster bosses on a workbench. They then can be refitted using a Tri-fold rivet which is specifically designed for plastic and carbon fibre. They cost a few pounds from a popular internet auction site.
    Just done my front mech hanger using this method and it worked a treat.
  • darrell1967darrell1967 Posts: 455
    Mootsboy said:

    I would carefully drill out the rivets and then you will have access to drill & re-tap the adjuster bosses on a workbench. They then can be refitted using a Tri-fold rivet which is specifically designed for plastic and carbon fibre. They cost a few pounds from a popular internet auction site.
    Just done my front mech hanger using this method and it worked a treat.

    Thanks. Is the inside of the downtube reinforced in any way?
  • lesfirthlesfirth Posts: 1,356

    Mootsboy said:

    I would carefully drill out the rivets and then you will have access to drill & re-tap the adjuster bosses on a workbench. They then can be refitted using a Tri-fold rivet which is specifically designed for plastic and carbon fibre. They cost a few pounds from a popular internet auction site.
    Just done my front mech hanger using this method and it worked a treat.

    Thanks. Is the inside of the downtube reinforced in any way?
    I do not think it is. There is not much force on the rivets. I dont think riveted brake cable stops are reinforced and they are subject to much greater force.
  • darrell1967darrell1967 Posts: 455
    lesfirth said:

    Mootsboy said:

    I would carefully drill out the rivets and then you will have access to drill & re-tap the adjuster bosses on a workbench. They then can be refitted using a Tri-fold rivet which is specifically designed for plastic and carbon fibre. They cost a few pounds from a popular internet auction site.
    Just done my front mech hanger using this method and it worked a treat.

    Thanks. Is the inside of the downtube reinforced in any way?
    I do not think it is. There is not much force on the rivets. I dont think riveted brake cable stops are reinforced and they are subject to much greater force.
    Thanks Les. I think this is the way to go with this.
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