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Advice Please!!

Hello Everyone this is my first post on here. I am fairly new to road cycling and still very much finding my feet. I recently purchased my first bike - a Boardman SLR 8.6.
A friend of mine who is a keen cyclist has offered me a pair of RS81 wheels which would be a great upgrade (the stock wheels aren’t that great and a pain to change inner tubes).
They are compatible size wise but my question is should i take the opportunity to put a bigger cassette on? If so what could i put on that would be compatible what is currently on the bike? (Specs can be seen here... https://www.boardmanbikes.com/gb_en/products/2130-slr-8.6-alloy.html)

Would be interested in your views - at this stage I’m not keen on changing the whole groupset as this would be another big outlay.

Thank you in advance

Ryan

Posts

  • oxomanoxoman Posts: 8,183
    Personally I'd just use what's on the bike until ìts worn out then think about upgrading rear cassette and anything else that needs replacing. 11/28 with a 50/34 chainset is pretty normal. Unless your riding really hilly stuff I wouldn't bother going 11/32 unless you have to.
    Too many bikes according to Mrs O.
  • joe_totale-2joe_totale-2 Posts: 1,048
    The rear derailleur can take up to a 32 tooth cassette but be aware that you may need a longer chain as well if you get a bigger one. That and you may need to adjust the b screw.

    I'd be inclined to agree with oxoman and keep using what you're using, the wheels themselves will be a great upgrade and I'd also use this opportunity to change the tyres form the stock ones that your Boardman came with.
  • The rear derailleur can take up to a 32 tooth cassette but be aware that you may need a longer chain as well if you get a bigger one. That and you may need to adjust the b screw.

    I'd be inclined to agree with oxoman and keep using what you're using, the wheels themselves will be a great upgrade and I'd also use this opportunity to change the tyres form the stock ones that your Boardman came with.

    Thank you. Much appreciated
  • The rear derailleur can take up to a 32 tooth cassette but be aware that you may need a longer chain as well if you get a bigger one. That and you may need to adjust the b screw.

    I'd be inclined to agree with oxoman and keep using what you're using, the wheels themselves will be a great upgrade and I'd also use this opportunity to change the tyres form the stock ones that your Boardman came with.



    I have purchased some gatorskins on the advice of friends. I like the idea of a hard wearing tyre that reduces the chance of punctures, I have also gone up to a 28mm tyre.
  • fortyonefortyone Posts: 161
    When I here people buying new bikes I think the most important things are whether the bar stem is the right length, are the bars the right size, can I put sufficient spacers on top of the headset to feel comfortable, is the chainset right, is the saddle OK (as these can be killers on the backside)? Just me, but I like to build my own with my own preferences.
    Graham
  • navrig2navrig2 Posts: 1,556
    I don't want to be a scaremonger but check how the RS81 are for tyre changing. One of my riding mates has Shimano Ultegra wheels and they are right sod to change tyre. If he gets a puncture when we are out our hearts all sink and we start looking for some where to setup the campsite. After we discovered this I had a quick search on here and a few other reported the same issue.
  • oxomanoxoman Posts: 8,183
    I've found using the better tyre levers aimed at tubeless tyres are life savers and make it easy.
    Too many bikes according to Mrs O.
  • amrushtonamrushton Posts: 738
    practice removing/installing a tyre at home - by the roadside in heat/cold/rain is not the place to discover you cant do it or havent got the necessary item(s)
  • webboowebboo Posts: 2,670

    The rear derailleur can take up to a 32 tooth cassette but be aware that you may need a longer chain as well if you get a bigger one. That and you may need to adjust the b screw.

    I'd be inclined to agree with oxoman and keep using what you're using, the wheels themselves will be a great upgrade and I'd also use this opportunity to change the tyres form the stock ones that your Boardman came with.



    I have purchased some gatorskins on the advice of friends. I like the idea of a hard wearing tyre that reduces the chance of punctures, I have also gone up to a 28mm tyre.
    If my friends recommended Gatorskins I’d be changing my friends. They might not puncture but don’t go round a wet corner at anything faster than walking pace.
  • N0bodyOfTheGoatN0bodyOfTheGoat Posts: 4,224

    I have purchased some gatorskins on the advice of friends.

    Friends don't recommend Gatorskins to each other, a pair of GP5000s would have been an infinitely better buy.

    ================
    2020 Voodoo Marasa
    2017 Cube Attain GTC Pro Disc 2016
    2016 Voodoo Wazoo
  • joe_totale-2joe_totale-2 Posts: 1,048
    It's funny that Gatorskins still seem to be the go to tyre for more casual cyclists.
    It's not because they're cheap either, on the contrary they're really expensive for what they are.

    Why do they still have such a high reputation with casual cyclists?
  • Darius_JedburghDarius_Jedburgh Posts: 675



    Why do they still have such a high reputation with casual cyclists?

    The name is all important. Sounds good.
  • oxomanoxoman Posts: 8,183
    Certainly not a casual rider but also not a racer. More than happy when I ran gaterskins as I didn't get P fairy visits whilst commuting or Audax, sportives C2C etc. Don't use them now as tubeless.
    Too many bikes according to Mrs O.
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