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Inner Bearing Puller

I have successfully changed the bearings in my Novatec hub and freehub.
I extracted the bearings using a long screwdriver and a hammer. They were destroyed after that but as I was replacing them so what.

Just wondered if one of the cheap inner bearing puller kits from Ebay are ok for home use such as 5pc-Inner-Bearing-Puller-Tool-Kit-Remover-Blind-Internal-Slide-Hammer.

I'd like to find a gentler way as I need to assist my son changing his mtb frame bearings and there are lots of them that have to be changed far too frequently.

Posts

  • lesfirthlesfirth Posts: 1,147
    That looks like an OK piece of kit. You have made me think that I need one.
  • oxomanoxoman Posts: 9,253
    Looks good as long as they're the right sizes for you. Worth looking at Amazon as well.
    Too many bikes according to Mrs O.
  • oxoman said:

    Looks good as long as they're the right sizes for you. Worth looking at Amazon as well.

    11-32 mm internal covers the vast majority of bearings out there... 10 mm axles are becoming very rare
  • laurentianlaurentian Posts: 1,812
    Used someting very similar to remove bearings from Fulcrum Racing 5 a few months ago. Worked perfectly.

    I guess if you were removing brearings on a daily or weekly basis as part of your job, you'd probably go for something a bit more top end but for "once or twice every couple of years" use I would imagine it will last you a lifetime
    Wilier Izoard XP
  • paulbnixpaulbnix Posts: 520
    I ordered one from Amazon that looks identical and is only £22.
    Next bearing here we come :smile:
  • www.thecycleclinic.co.uk
  • skeetamskeetam Posts: 167
    edited January 2020
    I've used both the eBay kit and the VAR kits. The VAR is much better quality and easier to setup and use but it's much more expensive. Both do the job but you make your choice.
  • The VAR one relies on being able to route the shaft to the opposite side of the hub, which is usually possible, but not always possible. The other one can extract a bearing out of a dead end well, so it's more versatile in that respect
  • True but the ebay offering operates on a wide range of bearing I'd for each collet. That likely to lead to failed extraction. The better kits have more than 5 pieces for the same range and a heavier hammer. Sealy do a good kit. Good tools are worth the money. If your a home mechanic you still need to do a good job.
    www.thecycleclinic.co.uk
  • I got one of those cheap ones from eBay and it was rubbish for novatec hubs. I now use the wheel manufacturing ones which work really well

    https://wheelsmfg.com/presses-tools/bearing-extractors/6001-6801-6901-12mm-sealed-bearing-extractor.html
  • skeetamskeetam Posts: 167
    stavgold said:

    I got one of those cheap ones from eBay and it was rubbish for novatec hubs. I now use the wheel manufacturing ones which work really well

    https://wheelsmfg.com/presses-tools/bearing-extractors/6001-6801-6901-12mm-sealed-bearing-extractor.html

    Yes, I have a few of these bearing extractors by Wheels Manufacturing, they're very good!
  • paulbnixpaulbnix Posts: 520
    Sounds like I might have wasted £20 but I'll wait and see how it works on the next bearing I have to extract.
    I find that often I need to buy the cheap one first in order to fully appreciate how good the dearer one is.
  • stavgold said:

    I got one of those cheap ones from eBay and it was rubbish for novatec hubs. I now use the wheel manufacturing ones which work really well

    https://wheelsmfg.com/presses-tools/bearing-extractors/6001-6801-6901-12mm-sealed-bearing-extractor.html

    I bought those and found them terrible and had to buy other tools.
    www.thecycleclinic.co.uk
  • paulbnix said:

    Sounds like I might have wasted £20 but I'll wait and see how it works on the next bearing I have to extract.
    I find that often I need to buy the cheap one first in order to fully appreciate how good the dearer one is.

    Its £20. It might be ok for the bearing you ha e to extract.
    www.thecycleclinic.co.uk
  • paulbnixpaulbnix Posts: 520
    Well its arrived. Looked quite good for £20.
    I tried extracting the bearings from an old Miche freehub. The outer bearing popped out with a couple of drops of the weight on the tool.
    I was not successful extracting the inner bearing (even after remembering to remove the circlip)
    So its good for changing the outer on a freehub and as that's the one that usually goes as it more exposed then I'm reasonably happy.
  • skeetamskeetam Posts: 167
    edited February 2020
    paulbnix said:

    Well its arrived. Looked quite good for £20.
    I tried extracting the bearings from an old Miche freehub. The outer bearing popped out with a couple of drops of the weight on the tool.
    I was not successful extracting the inner bearing (even after remembering to remove the circlip)
    So its good for changing the outer on a freehub and as that's the one that usually goes as it more exposed then I'm reasonably happy.

    Can you tap the inner bearing out with a socket of suitable size? Usually a 15mm does the trick.
  • paulbnixpaulbnix Posts: 520
    Probably.
    But I was just using the old freehub to test the tool.
    The inner bearing is actually ok If I ever need to use this freehub again.
  • lesfirthlesfirth Posts: 1,147
    paulbnix said:

    Well its arrived. Looked quite good for £20.
    I tried extracting the bearings from an old Miche freehub. The outer bearing popped out with a couple of drops of the weight on the tool.
    I was not successful extracting the inner bearing (even after remembering to remove the circlip)
    So its good for changing the outer on a freehub and as that's the one that usually goes as it more exposed then I'm reasonably happy.

    It would be interesting to know exactly why you were unable to remove the inner bearing. Your reference to "dropping the weight" suggests you may not be too familiar with the use of a slide hammer puller.
  • paulbnixpaulbnix Posts: 520
    The freehub was placed above a hole in some wood clamped in a workmate so the tool was hanging vertically. The "dropping of the weight" was all that was needed to remove the outer bearing.
    The inner bearing was quite easily removed from the top of the freehub but would not go through the bottom. It must not have been square on.
    The inner bearing had some very forceful "drops" of the weight but was wedged firmly.
    I had a couple of tries by pushing the bearing back in but then gave up.
  • david37david37 Posts: 1,313
    paulbnix said:

    The freehub was placed above a hole in some wood clamped in a workmate so the tool was hanging vertically. The "dropping of the weight" was all that was needed to remove the outer bearing.
    The inner bearing was quite easily removed from the top of the freehub but would not go through the bottom. It must not have been square on.
    The inner bearing had some very forceful "drops" of the weight but was wedged firmly.
    I had a couple of tries by pushing the bearing back in but then gave up.

    sometimes you need to be quite forceful..... or heat it up a bit, a hairdryer for a few mins perhaps (and then be quite forceful)
  • edward.sedward.s Posts: 170
    Check for hidden circlips is my advice. Ask me how I know.....
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