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Flat Pedals, What Shoes?

OK, I normally ride in clipless pedals, Road and old MTB, But on my Cube 29'er I have a pair of Flat Pedals, are there any dedicated cycling shoes available for MTB flat pedals? or do most people just ride in trainers with flat pedals?
Thanks. M...

Posts

  • parmosparmos Posts: 77
    i have flats on my MTB & Hybrid and i just use my trail running trainers they've got a decent knobbly sole which keeps a bit of grip with the peddle
  • edward.sedward.s Posts: 138
    There are dedicated shoes. Grippy rubber sole and reasonably stiff seems to be the formula. I'd recommend looking at the 5-10 range, can't really go wrong with them. make sure your pedals have decent pins for maximum grip.
  • MostynMostyn Posts: 30
    edward.s said:

    There are dedicated shoes. Grippy rubber sole and reasonably stiff seems to be the formula. I'd recommend looking at the 5-10 range, can't really go wrong with them. make sure your pedals have decent pins for maximum grip.

    Hi Edward,
    Do you recommend any Brand-Type of dedicated shoes for flat pedals?

  • JBAJBA Posts: 2,608
    edited December 2019
    5:10
    Adidas
    Giro
    Specialized
    etc.

    They all make shoes for flat pedals. Do a Google search and you'll find loads of reviews and recommendations.

    Alternatively put SPD pedals on your Cube and carry on riding clipless.
    “Life has been unfaithful
    And it all promised so so much”

    Giant Trance 2 27.5 2016 ¦ Bird Zero Mk1 ¦ Giant Revolt Advanced 2 2019 ¦ Giant Anthem 3 2015 ¦ Specialized Myka Comp FSR 2009
  • edward.sedward.s Posts: 138
    Mostyn said:

    edward.s said:

    There are dedicated shoes. Grippy rubber sole and reasonably stiff seems to be the formula. I'd recommend looking at the 5-10 range, can't really go wrong with them. make sure your pedals have decent pins for maximum grip.

    Hi Edward,
    Do you recommend any Brand-Type of dedicated shoes for flat pedals?

    5-10 freerider or impact. You can often get freeriders for about £50. Bear in mind that I'm a roadie at heart, I only MTB 'cause my son likes it, and I've only owned one pair of flat shoes, some 5-10 impact pros. That said, if you hang about at any trail centre you'll mostly see 5-10s on people
  • mattyfezmattyfez Posts: 638
    edited December 2019
    I'm a tight censored and just use ~£30 karrimor shoes or boots.
    They work for me. Reasonably stiff soles.
    I have metal pins in my pedals though so that probably helps.

    I find the soles on regular trainers or skate board trainers too floppy and prefer the stiffer sole of a more walking shoe style preferable. YMMV

    5-10 are probably the defcato mtb shoe for flat pedals but I don't like the price of them.
  • JoshtyersJoshtyers Posts: 5
    edited December 2019
    I use some karrimor walking trainers as well. Work well for me. Just need some decent pins on the pedals.
    However I would like to try some proper mtb flat shoes.just too tight to buy any haha
  • steve_sordysteve_sordy Posts: 1,943
    As said previously, shoes designed for flats have a stiff sole for efficiency and a soft grippy rubber to engage with the pins on the flats. The grip is the most important aspect, which is why hard-soled trainers are no good for riding flats.

    Shimano do some very good shoes for flats (and spds). They are 90% as grippy as 510s, which is good IMO. It's good because the 510s are so grippy that I can't shuffle my foot into a better position if I get it wrong the first time. I have to lift my foot completely off the pedal and replant. This is not always possible if I am riding something trickyl According to forum reports this was a common feature of 510s. It was the main reason why I stopped using my 510s and went to Shimano. The other reason was the total lack of water-proofing on the 510s and their water absorbency. After a wet ride each shoe weighed a ton. I have read that 510 have improved on their early models in terms of water problems, but I'm very happy with the Shimano shoes so I have no reason to go back. <3
  • gomezzgomezz Posts: 63
    Joshtyers said:

    I use some karrimor walking trainers as well. Work well for me. Just need some decent pins on the pedals.
    However I would like to try some proper mtb flat shoes.just too tight to buy any haha

    Same for me, I have Karrimor trainer boots and decent pins and the grip is very good.
  • MostynMostyn Posts: 30
    Hi everyone'
    some really helpful replies "thank you all" I've just bought some DMR V12 Mag Pedals for £37, New inc postage, Now back to shoes; love the replies you guys put on here; and seems the consensus is for 5/10's I do like the free-rider - but even on offer (if you can find your size?) they're not cheap. Steve mentioned Shimano shoes for flat pedals? not found any on bike sites. I use Karrimor for some leisure riding with the wife . I will continue to look for suitable shoes from your recommendations. As some mentioned 5/10's can be expensive. Should anyone think of a really good (cheaper) alternative ? please mention it. Thanks for help and advice; appreciated
  • MostynMostyn Posts: 30

    As said previously, shoes designed for flats have a stiff sole for efficiency and a soft grippy rubber to engage with the pins on the flats. The grip is the most important aspect, which is why hard-soled trainers are no good for riding flats.

    Shimano do some very good shoes for flats (and spds). They are 90% as grippy as 510s, which is good IMO. It's good because the 510s are so grippy that I can't shuffle my foot into a better position if I get it wrong the first time. I have to lift my foot completely off the pedal and replant. This is not always possible if I am riding something trickyl According to forum reports this was a common feature of 510s. It was the main reason why I stopped using my 510s and went to Shimano. The other reason was the total lack of water-proofing on the 510s and their water absorbency. After a wet ride each shoe weighed a ton. I have read that 510 have improved on their early models in terms of water problems, but I'm very happy with the Shimano shoes so I have no reason to go back. <3 </p>

    Do you have a link to the Shimano shoes your using? are they really grippy on flat pedals?
    Thanks

  • mattyfezmattyfez Posts: 638
    I think karrimor is the cheaper alternative, I use them with superstar nano flats with the medium pins rather than the longer ones..

    They just don't slip, if you want to reposition your foot you have to lift off put it back down again.
    Sounds counter intuitive as karrimor shoes/boots have quite chunky tread blocks, but I'd guess as long as your flats have a decent amount of pins, your shoes ain't slipping, at least that's my experience.
  • steve_sordysteve_sordy Posts: 1,943
    Mostyn said:

    As said previously, shoes designed for flats have a stiff sole for efficiency and a soft grippy rubber to engage with the pins on the flats. The grip is the most important aspect, which is why hard-soled trainers are no good for riding flats.

    Shimano do some very good shoes for flats (and spds). They are 90% as grippy as 510s, which is good IMO. It's good because the 510s are so grippy that I can't shuffle my foot into a better position if I get it wrong the first time. I have to lift my foot completely off the pedal and replant. This is not always possible if I am riding something trickyl According to forum reports this was a common feature of 510s. It was the main reason why I stopped using my 510s and went to Shimano. The other reason was the total lack of water-proofing on the 510s and their water absorbency. After a wet ride each shoe weighed a ton. I have read that 510 have improved on their early models in terms of water problems, but I'm very happy with the Shimano shoes so I have no reason to go back. <3 </p>

    Do you have a link to the Shimano shoes your using? are they really grippy on flat pedals?
    Thanks

    I Googled "Shimano flat pedal shoes" and got absolutely loads of hits.Here's one:
    https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=shimano+flat+pedal+shoes&sxsrf=ACYBGNQYMk6CfpnFHouY7zfiJZSUgnUHwA:1576433700882&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiqw4KWobjmAhW0oVwKHVd_AHYQ_AUoAnoECA0QBA&biw=1366&bih=625
  • JBAJBA Posts: 2,608
    edited December 2019
    I put a link in my post way up there to Adidas.
    The Terrex often come up for sale on various sites. It's just a matter of searching and keeping a look out for bargains.
    Adidas now owns 5.10 and use the same Stealth rubber compound for the soles.
    “Life has been unfaithful
    And it all promised so so much”

    Giant Trance 2 27.5 2016 ¦ Bird Zero Mk1 ¦ Giant Revolt Advanced 2 2019 ¦ Giant Anthem 3 2015 ¦ Specialized Myka Comp FSR 2009
  • MostynMostyn Posts: 30
    JBA said:

    5:10
    Adidas
    Giro
    Specialized
    etc.

    They all make shoes for flat pedals. Do a Google search and you'll find loads of reviews and recommendations.

    Alternatively put SPD pedals on your Cube and carry on riding clipless.

    Need flat pedals because my granddaughter is going to be riding shot-gun with me from time to time.



  • I'm another vote for 5.10's.

    I rode for years using cross trainers or walking trainers. They did the job but never to my full satisfaction. I'd heard about 5.10's and resistent the urge for a long time, thinking they were a bit of a fad and I didn't need them.

    I was wrong.

    They aren't cheap, but for me, they've made a massive difference to how I ride. They are a bit like velcro, your feet hardly move and sometimes it can be hard to make small adjustments. That is a small issue compared to how I feel so much more attached to the bike and `in control`.

    I ride both FS and HT. My HT used to have older school plastic toe clips as my feet would bounce off the pedals (using my cheaper walking shoes). With 5.10's I don't have any issues and I forget I'm on a HT.

    So - can you buy something cheaper? Yes. Will they work as well? Maybe. Would I wear anything else? No.

    I've always bought mine in sales so never paid full price.

    I love mine - but there are alternatives.

    "Ride, crash, replace"
  • dabberdabber Posts: 1,608
    billycool said:
    I think the Freerider Elements has been replaced (renamed?) by the Freerider DLX. I've got a pair coming for Christmas and I'm looking forward to seeing how they perform. Btw, I got mine from Sprockets who seemed to have them at a competitive price and delivered quickly.

    “You may think that; I couldn’t possibly comment!”

    Wilier Cento Uno SR/Wilier Mortirolo/Specialized Roubaix Comp/Calibre Bossnut
  • i.bhamrai.bhamra Posts: 128
    A cheaper option than the five-tens:

    planetx.co.uk/i/q/SHFLRAFX/on-one-vulcan-shoe

    I mostly ride road but have just bought a 2nd hand 29er HT to try something a little different. Bought a pair of these after a few rides in trainers, not tried them yet but they look solid enough....
  • i.bhamra said:

    A cheaper option than the five-tens:

    planetx.co.uk/i/q/SHFLRAFX/on-one-vulcan-shoe

    I mostly ride road but have just bought a 2nd hand 29er HT to try something a little different. Bought a pair of these after a few rides in trainers, not tried them yet but they look solid enough....

    They look similar to 5.10's to me so worth a go.
    "Ride, crash, replace"
  • dabber said:

    billycool said:
    I think the Freerider Elements has been replaced (renamed?) by the Freerider DLX. I've got a pair coming for Christmas and I'm looking forward to seeing how they perform. Btw, I got mine from Sprockets who seemed to have them at a competitive price and delivered quickly.

    Yeah - just having a look at the current range.

    I've just checked and I've actually got some 5.10 EPS shoes for winter riding. They are `waterproof` and have a Primaloft lining. Certainly better for wet/cold riding and work well with a set of Sealskinz socks. I went half a size bigger to allow for thicker socks and it works well.

    My summer shoes are standard canvas Freeriders. Bit lighter and less rigid.
    "Ride, crash, replace"
  • swod1swod1 Posts: 1,639
    Depends on what you want to spend really, I've got 4 pairs of flat pedal shoes bought mostly in sales

    adidas terrex trailcross
    adidas terrex trailcross protect
    five ten freerider dlx
    five ten impacts vxi

    Just keep an eye out on the sales depending on your size you can pick some up discounted.

    I have used shimano shoes in the past the Vibram sole was great and never had a problem with them and lasted ages but it seems the stealth sole is the one to get.

    Mine are used with dmr vault pedals.
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