Saddle post glued into frame

Hi. I have a carbon fibre saddle post which has been glued into the carbon steel frame by previous owner. I need to lower the seat but cannot move the saddle post from it's current position. Any ideas how I can solve the problem.

Posts

  • billycoolbillycool Posts: 770
    Silly question - but how do you know it's actually glued?

    I'm only asking as it might be some sort of carbon gripper paste?
    "Ride, crash, replace"
  • pilot_petepilot_pete Posts: 1,771
    billycool said:

    Silly question - but how do you know it's actually glued?

    I'm only asking as it might be some sort of carbon gripper paste?

    If it was carbon gripper paste he would be able to remove or alter the seatpost height as it wouldn’t be stuck! Carbon assembly paste is just to give the clamp something to grip the post against, it doesn’t set or act like glue in any way.

    To the OP, not sure what a ‘carbon steel’ frame is. Do you mean a carbon tubed, steel lugged frame? It may be possible to remove it, depends whether it is just stuck, how long it has been stuck for and/or if it genuinely has been glued in or not and what with. There are specialist companies that do this if you don’t know what you are doing or your local bike shop may be able to help. It may or may not be worth it depending on the value of the frame and it could damage the seatpost (which would be the cheaper part to replace).

    PP

  • me-109me-109 Posts: 1,105
    It's steel - it has carbon in it, ergo 'carbon steel'.

    As long as the OP doesn't mean carbon fibre, as that could be an integral seat mast, where the seat post is an extension of the seat tube with a 'topper' that forms the saddle clamp.
  • Could be that the carbon frame has a partial alu/steel 'sleeve' on part of the seat tube and subsequently the carbon seat post has seized into the frame? I have same issue but to be honest I'm 53 years old and have stopped growing! Plus the frame is getting replaced (hopefully?!) within the next 2 years so i'm not too fussed about my problem.

    Would 'spraying Plus Gas' and leaving it for a while help any?
  • StillGoingStillGoing Posts: 5,017
    TACX iFlow - basic, Bushido smart -Rubbish, Elite Kura - not smart, Direto - awful, Tacx Neo1 - perfect.
  • timothywtimothyw Posts: 2,412
    Loving the amount of responses given to someone's first post when they claim (improbably) that someone has glued a seatpost in place.

    I suggest this guy - https://theseatpostman.com/
  • Thanks all that helped ..... I used the hot water method used in the GCN video suggested by StillGoing in the above post. It worked a treat and no damage to the frame or the seat post. FYI it wasnt glued in merely seized up. Took about one and a half hours and job done. Thanks to everyone that replied.......
  • billycoolbillycool Posts: 770

    billycool said:

    Silly question - but how do you know it's actually glued?

    I'm only asking as it might be some sort of carbon gripper paste?

    If it was carbon gripper paste he would be able to remove or alter the seatpost height as it wouldn’t be stuck! Carbon assembly paste is just to give the clamp something to grip the post against, it doesn’t set or act like glue in any way.

    To the OP, not sure what a ‘carbon steel’ frame is. Do you mean a carbon tubed, steel lugged frame? It may be possible to remove it, depends whether it is just stuck, how long it has been stuck for and/or if it genuinely has been glued in or not and what with. There are specialist companies that do this if you don’t know what you are doing or your local bike shop may be able to help. It may or may not be worth it depending on the value of the frame and it could damage the seatpost (which would be the cheaper part to replace).

    PP

    Thanks - was just checking that it wasn't seized for another reason and he was mistaking some sort of gripper paste for `glue`.

    "Ride, crash, replace"
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,561
    Use gripper paste when you refit it, it not only helps in stay in place when you want it to, it helps it move when you want it to as well.

    All steel frames have carbon in them, so probably best to just call it steel from now on.....otherwise you appear a bit of a newb.
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