CO2 cartridges on planes

Hiya

Has anyone ever had their CO2 cartridges taken out of their bags between check-in desk and arrival?

Did they leave a note..? I think I had an avi-airbag one taken last weekend but there was no note or anything.

I've always been of the 'you have to be prepared to lose it but it'll be fine' school of thought and have passed through many times with it stuffed into my ski boot. Same with bike ones.

The trouble with them not leaving a note is that...I'm not sure if I haven't just forgotten it.

The airbag ones are not cheap... :'(
We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
- @ddraver

Comments

  • This is such a confusing area.
    CAA rules say you should be allowed through with them either in hand luggage or hold luggage (of course it will vary according to whichever country you're flying into). But this is one of those situations where being right isn't enough - I've often had them removed from hand luggage, and it's pointless arguing; particularly because at hand luggage security screen they're only applying the local laws, they have no idea where you're flying to. Sometimes they go through, sometimes they don't. For that reason, I've never put them in hold luggage, even though, as you say you should be able to "pass through" as the hassle if they removed them, or refused the luggage altogether would be too great.

    CAA rules https://caa.co.uk/Passengers/Before-you-fly/Baggage/Items-that-are-allowed-in-baggage/
  • fenix
    fenix Posts: 5,437
    I doubt they leave notes.
    Why risk it though ? Unless you want them rummaging through your kit and damaging or not putting it together again.

    Didn't realize air bag canisters would be different ? That must be a tiny market ?
  • pilot_pete
    pilot_pete Posts: 2,120
    It doesn’t matter what the authority says (in respect to them saying you can), as each carrier operates under their own AOC (Air Operators Certificate) and this has defined within it what dangerous goods the carrier will/ will not permit on board under their licence.

    So the carrier (the airline) will have its own rules and airport security (under the DfT) will have its security rules, and believe it or not each airport can make its own, more restrictive rules as it sees fit!

    Items that fall under dangerous goods regulations (you’d be surprised just how many everyday items actually fall under the dangerous goods regulations) can be permitted, restricted or forbidden depending on their classification and ultimately the danger they pose to the aircraft. Individual items may be permitted, but a box of the same items may not. And so it goes on.

    CO2 inflators fall under the dangerous goods regulations but pose little risk to the safety of the aircraft - they are pressurised but it is an inert gas. However, many airlines will just ban them all together (can’t be arsed to argue) whilst others will permit them. EasyJet for example will permit up to four to be carried. Here is the page which defines this in their Conditions of Carriage https://www.easyjet.com/en/terms-and-conditions/dangerous-goods If you scroll down to ‘Small non flammable gas cylinders’ you will find the rule there. Might be useful to bookmark that page for check-in as many of the staff will be unaware. When you take your bike box to Outsize Baggage to get it x-rayed you will possibly once again be challenged. It helps if you are to get the carrier’s representative (a check in supervisor) to confirm that they are permitted as the outsize baggage staff will be airport security.

    It is all a ball ache and can be very frustrating, but do your research and find the carriers conditions of carriage, especially in relation to dangerous goods, before you book your ticket and you will know. This still doesn’t guarantee that you will get the, on because you may meet a jobsworth at check in who just says no and you can decide to argue the toss or not for the sake of a few quids worth of CO2. Maybe just spend time researching a local bike shop near the airport and pick a few up when you land!!!

    There is however good reason for all these dangerous goods regulations as aeroplanes have been brought down by seemingly innocuous items packed in hold/ hand luggage when they have exploded/ burst into flames/ ignited something else/ corroded/ poisoned etc

    One of the biggest nightmares at the moment is batteries in various personal electronic devices, some made to cheap or non existent Far Eastern regulations which thermally run away and burst into flames. Take a look on YouTube at a laptop battery run away - there was a great video of one at LAX airport in the departure lounge! You would not want to be on an aeroplane at 38,000’ with one of those happening...

    PP
  • ddraver
    ddraver Posts: 26,437
    edited November 2019
    fenix said:

    That must be a tiny market ?

    A lot of ski & snowboarders in the world Fenix, Pilot Pete - we're talking a hundred smackers or more for one of these though

    Well I'm wondering if it was just unlucky, but there was no way I could have argued a case. Until I'd unpacked, I had no idea

    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • phil485
    phil485 Posts: 364
    I have found that you can email British Airways and inform them that you wish to travel with cartridges. I have always had this approved and a note added to my booking.
    not had an issue yet
  • pilot_pete
    pilot_pete Posts: 2,120
    ddraver said:

    fenix said:

    That must be a tiny market ?

    A lot of ski & snowboarders in the world Fenix, Pilot Pete - we're talking a hundred smackers or more for one of these though

    Well I'm wondering if it was just unlucky, but there was no way I could have argued a case. Until I'd unpacked, I had no idea

    Being a cycling forum I was only talking about tyre inflating CO2 canisters, but I would guess the same regulation applies to the canisters you pictured. I would have thought there was a gap in the market to produce similar, much cheaper alternatives to those if they cost a hundred squid!!!

    Same advice holds true though - check the conditions of carriage relating to dangerous goods, and/ or do as phil485 says and contact the carrier direct.

    PP

  • ddraver
    ddraver Posts: 26,437
    I don't know why they re so much to be honest. Weight I guess. and then they have to work with 100% certainty, in sub zero conditions, in some of the most violent conditions a human body could experience without death (50% of the time...)
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • It doesn’t matter what the authority says (in respect to them saying you can), as each carrier operates under their own AOC (Air Operators Certificate) and this has defined within it what dangerous goods the carrier will/ will not permit on board under their licence.

    So the carrier (the airline) will have its own rules and airport security (under the DfT) will have its security rules, and believe it or not each airport can make its own, more restrictive rules as it sees fit!

    Items that fall under dangerous goods regulations (you’d be surprised just how many everyday items actually fall under the dangerous goods regulations) can be permitted, restricted or forbidden depending on their classification and ultimately the danger they pose to the aircraft. Individual items may be permitted, but a box of the same items may not. And so it goes on.

    CO2 inflators fall under the dangerous goods regulations but pose little risk to the safety of the aircraft - they are pressurised but it is an inert gas. However, many airlines will just ban them all together (can’t be arsed to argue) whilst others will permit them. EasyJet for example will permit up to four to be carried. Here is the page which defines this in their Conditions of Carriage https://www.easyjet.com/en/terms-and-conditions/dangerous-goods If you scroll down to ‘Small non flammable gas cylinders’ you will find the rule there. Might be useful to bookmark that page for check-in as many of the staff will be unaware. When you take your bike box to Outsize Baggage to get it x-rayed you will possibly once again be challenged. It helps if you are to get the carrier’s representative (a check in supervisor) to confirm that they are permitted as the outsize baggage staff will be airport security.

    It is all a ball ache and can be very frustrating, but do your research and find the carriers conditions of carriage, especially in relation to dangerous goods, before you book your ticket and you will know. This still doesn’t guarantee that you will get the, on because you may meet a jobsworth at check in who just says no and you can decide to argue the toss or not for the sake of a few quids worth of CO2. Maybe just spend time researching a local bike shop near the airport and pick a few up when you land!!!

    There is however good reason for all these dangerous goods regulations as aeroplanes have been brought down by seemingly innocuous items packed in hold/ hand luggage when they have exploded/ burst into flames/ ignited something else/ corroded/ poisoned etc

    One of the biggest nightmares at the moment is batteries in various personal electronic devices, some made to cheap or non existent Far Eastern regulations which thermally run away and burst into flames. Take a look on YouTube at a laptop battery run away - there was a great video of one at LAX airport in the departure lounge! You would not want to be on an aeroplane at 38,000’ with one of those happening...

    PP

    That's really interesting and helpful PP. So if I wanted to bring CO2 cartridges with me would you recommend putting them in your bike box or in your hold luggage (assuming that the carrier allowed them on board). I've always had them in carry on luggage, on the grounds that it is least hassle if they get removed (which they do often!). I've never put them in hold luggage or bike box because (1) at oversize they often ask if there's any CO2 (2) it's a hassle to unpack if there is and (3) if it's in my hold luggage and it gets rejected at scan, that's going to cause a whole lot of hassle. I realise that the best option is just to try to buy on the far side...
  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 26,165
    edited December 2019
    If anything, this thread has convinced me to continue taking a pump.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • The check in desk is not the problem, it is the oversize cargo drop off desk.
    Going through Manchester, the person on the desk refused to allow CO2 through. It is not worth the hassle, so just took them out and binned them.
    On the way back, another guy tried to refuse my chain lube bottle. I had to open the bag, he searched the entire bag by hand, and then wrote out a full incident report with a huge queue behind me before allowing me to take it with.
  • chris_bass
    chris_bass Posts: 4,913
    pblakeney said:

    If anything, this thread has convinced me to continue using a pump.

    if you are still going i'd suggest the inner tube has a hole in it
    www.conjunctivitis.com - a site for sore eyes
  • Dorset_Boy
    Dorset_Boy Posts: 7,080
    With BA, contact the airline by email, print off one copy of the email and wrap it around the canisters, and keep a second copy with your travel documents.
    I suspect other European carriers would be the same, and as said above, Easyjet allow you to take 4 per person, in either checked or hand luggage.
    It seems to be the US carriers that don't allow you to take any, even though there is one attached to every lifejacket on the plane!
  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 26,165

    pblakeney said:

    If anything, this thread has convinced me to continue taking a pump.

    if you are still going i'd suggest the inner tube has a hole in it
    Corrected. 🤣🤣
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • chris_bass
    chris_bass Posts: 4,913
    pblakeney said:

    pblakeney said:

    If anything, this thread has convinced me to continue taking a pump.

    if you are still going i'd suggest the inner tube has a hole in it
    Corrected. 🤣🤣
    you are such a let down!
    www.conjunctivitis.com - a site for sore eyes
  • pilot_pete
    pilot_pete Posts: 2,120
    topcattim said:

    That's really interesting and helpful PP. So if I wanted to bring CO2 cartridges with me would you recommend putting them in your bike box or in your hold luggage (assuming that the carrier allowed them on board). I've always had them in carry on luggage, on the grounds that it is least hassle if they get removed (which they do often!). I've never put them in hold luggage or bike box because (1) at oversize they often ask if there's any CO2 (2) it's a hassle to unpack if there is and (3) if it's in my hold luggage and it gets rejected at scan, that's going to cause a whole lot of hassle. I realise that the best option is just to try to buy on the far side...

    I would recommend reading the airline’s conditions of carriage (available on their website) and follow the guidance that they offer - it will usually tell you if they will accept them, and either in hand or hold luggage, or both. If still unsure, contact the airline directly, but don’t be surprised if the person on the phone doesn’t really know the answer and just says ‘no’ as it’s easier than trying to find a definitive answer...

    PP

  • ddraver
    ddraver Posts: 26,437
    Well...so...about that....

    Turns out it wasnt taken at the airport....it felt out of my bag whilst packing and...ahem...rolled under the couch....


    PP, I dont suppose for fly post planes do you? Any idea what courier will send a cartridge to Switzerland?

    :|
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • pilot_pete
    pilot_pete Posts: 2,120
    ddraver said:

    Well...so...about that....

    Turns out it wasnt taken at the airport....it felt out of my bag whilst packing and...ahem...rolled under the couch....


    PP, I dont suppose for fly post planes do you? Any idea what courier will send a cartridge to Switzerland?

    :|

    I do, yes. What do you mean by ‘send a cartridge to Switzerland?’

    PP

  • chris_bass
    chris_bass Posts: 4,913
    wiggle deliver internationally don't they?
    www.conjunctivitis.com - a site for sore eyes
  • drlodge
    drlodge Posts: 4,826
    Easyjet allow them in your hold luggage, or at least they did a few years back
    WyndyMilla Massive Attack | Rourke 953 | Condor Italia 531 Pro | Boardman CX Pro | DT Swiss RR440 Tubeless Wheels
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  • pilot_pete
    pilot_pete Posts: 2,120

    ddraver said:

    Well...so...about that....

    Turns out it wasnt taken at the airport....it felt out of my bag whilst packing and...ahem...rolled under the couch....


    PP, I dont suppose for fly post planes do you? Any idea what courier will send a cartridge to Switzerland?

    :|

    I do, yes. What do you mean by ‘send a cartridge to Switzerland?’

    PP

    I’ll just correct that answer as I missed the word ‘post’! I fly passengers now but used to fly freight for DHL... ;)

    PP

  • ddraver
    ddraver Posts: 26,437

    wiggle deliver internationally don't they?

    ...not to resurrect this too much but I did try and order some bike cartridges to NL once and they wouldn't post them overseas...that was a long time ago though

    Unfortunately its just bloomin' poured with rain all over our lovely powder so there ain't gonna be much off-piste fun this week :(
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • Just flown to GC with Jet 2 and then back again.
    Co2 was allowed but was limited to 4 cartridges. They have no problem with it.
    Trek,,,, too cool for school ,, apparently
  • skeetam
    skeetam Posts: 178
    edited December 2019

    Just flown to GC with Jet 2 and then back again.
    Co2 was allowed but was limited to 4 cartridges. They have no problem with it.


    I flew with JET2 in August from Leeds Bradford and they wouldn't let me fly with one. I bought a couple while I was away, put them in my saddle bag and totally forgot about them. On the return journey, Palma airport weren't bothered so they came home with me.