SAGAN to Giro in 2020

AlejandrosdogAlejandrosdog Posts: 2,007
edited October 2019 in Pro race
https://www.bbc.com/sport/cycling/50175459


wooop the Giro is definitely cementing its position as the best GT for me.
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Posts

  • RichN95.RichN95. Posts: 22,652
    I can see a lot of sprinters opting for the Giro this year. There's a lot there for them in the first two weeks.
    Twitter: @RichN95
  • https://www.bbc.com/sport/cycling/50175459


    wooop the Giro is definitely cementing its position as the best GT for me.


    Possible Sagan stages:

    Stage 4 finish by my reckoning is around 4kms at 5%.

    j2GnY28sYNfPjxqsaow6_231019-012651-968x458.jpg

    Stage 6 if they put the hammer down on the climb and get rid of any pure sprinters.

    XENOO6QvuPxChvpxlJ4L_231019-012817-954x542.jpg

    Stages 9 and 10.

    6ikn5qXksM9y0R1hYhTr_231019-013024-968x430.jpg

    L5wjREJxvnhvH00gQ39j_231019-013045-968x403.jpg

    Stage 13.

    BtFOiIv72hEKnWVJmReq_231019-013935-968x385.jpg

    After which he will call it a day and leave the race.
    "Science is a tool for cheaters". An anonymous French PE teacher.
  • ShutupJensShutupJens Posts: 1,373

    After which he will call it a day and leave the race.


    Which is why the Giro isn't the best grand tour. No one gives a censored about any of the jerseys except pink and the third week is so one dimensional
  • ProssPross Posts: 21,184
    ShutupJens wrote:

    After which he will call it a day and leave the race.


    Which is why the Giro isn't the best grand tour. No one gives a censored about any of the jerseys except pink and the third week is so one dimensional


    Careful, you're not a true cycling fan if you don't regularly point out that the Giro is better than the Tour!
  • ShutupJens wrote:

    After which he will call it a day and leave the race.


    Which is why the Giro isn't the best grand tour. No one gives a censored about any of the jerseys except pink and the third week is so one dimensional


    This year there will be a lot of riders who won't be giving a censored about the third week of the Tour, either.
    "Science is a tool for cheaters". An anonymous French PE teacher.
  • I might as well post this here.
    I know that the UK likes to mimic all things US, but I hope that we aren't heading for a similar California experience over here.

    https://www.cyclingweekly.com/news/racing/tour-of-britain/tour-britain-womens-tour-searching-new-main-sponsor-replace-ovo-energy-441711
    "Science is a tool for cheaters". An anonymous French PE teacher.
  • dowtchadowtcha Posts: 416
    Tour of california has been canceled. I guess he might as well go to a grand tour instead.
  • blazing_saddlesblazing_saddles Posts: 13,637
    edited December 2019
    He will not be alone. The Tour being such a tough gig next year, followed immediately by Tokyo, riders are turning in droves towards Italy.

    Ackermann, Majka, Pat Konrad and Max Schachmann will be joining Sagan at the Giro.


    "Science is a tool for cheaters". An anonymous French PE teacher.
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 44,470 Lives Here
    I always got the feeling that riders came out of the Tour in good form, if knackered, and it wasn't impossible to hold the form over to the Olympics.
  • RichN95.RichN95. Posts: 22,652
    edited December 2019
    Delete
    Twitter: @RichN95
  • andypandyp Posts: 8,103

    I always got the feeling that riders came out of the Tour in good form, if knackered, and it wasn't impossible to hold the form over to the Olympics.

    Agreed. The issue is the flight and time difference though. Finish the Tour and you've got four days to get Japan and adjust to the time difference. Which is a big ask.
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 44,470 Lives Here
    andyp said:

    I always got the feeling that riders came out of the Tour in good form, if knackered, and it wasn't impossible to hold the form over to the Olympics.

    Agreed. The issue is the flight and time difference though. Finish the Tour and you've got four days to get Japan and adjust to the time difference. Which is a big ask.
    See, this is the kind of detail that crowdsouricng chat on the forum can bring you.
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 44,470 Lives Here
    I have often wondered whether, for one off events, whether it's worth even bothering with adjusting to the local time and just using blackout curtains and full spectum lights to keep it going.

    I imagine there is a good reason why this is nonsense.
  • I have often wondered whether, for one off events, whether it's worth even bothering with adjusting to the local time and just using blackout curtains and full spectum lights to keep it going.

    I imagine there is a good reason why this is nonsense.

    Well the fact that the race will be ridden in local time might screw that plan up a bit. Given that riders have a set preparation for a ride - get up, eat breakfast, warm up, sign on etc. - it would probably be ridiculously hard to try and do that e.g. in the middle of their non-adjusted body-clock night. A sign-on time of 10am in Japan is 2am in France.
    “Road racing was over and the UCI had banned my riding positions on the track, so it was like ‘Jings, crivvens, help ma Boab, what do I do now? I know, I’ll go away and be depressed for 10 years’.”

    @DrHeadgear

    The Vikings are coming!
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 44,470 Lives Here
    Ja fair.
  • TheBigBeanTheBigBean Posts: 8,466
    I'm not convinced whether a race starting at 9am or 9pm makes much difference, so I would discount jetlag.

    I do think the likely 20 hours of travel can't be good preparation though.
  • m.r.m.m.r.m. Posts: 1,621
    Makes a difference for your bowel movement if you are regular and can thus cause issues during a 6-7 hour race.
    PTP Champion 2019
  • bobmcstuffbobmcstuff Posts: 7,812
    edited December 2019

    I'm not convinced whether a race starting at 9am or 9pm makes much difference, so I would discount jetlag.

    I do think the likely 20 hours of travel can't be good preparation though.

    The time of the event makes an enormous difference. Both with relation to your individual chronotype (https://sportsmedicine-open.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s40798-018-0162-z) and to your training.

    The body adapts very well to perform at specific times, and you can use this to counteract your natural circadian rhythm to some extent (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22531613). Olympic athletes do specific training based on the time of day the event is going to be at. That's why there was a load of controversy when they changed the timings very close to the events. Even amateurs will notice this, if you do all your training in the evening you will find it initially much more difficult to train in the morning and vice-versa.

    The interaction between an individuals' circadian rhythm and athletic performance is unequivocal. So if you throw someone off by 8 hours by travelling to Japan it could have a very significant difference (this article says one study found up to 26% https://www.insidescience.org/news/time-day-could-impact-athletes-performance-peak).

    You could argue that the difference may be less significant in longer duration events like a bike race.
  • bobmcstuffbobmcstuff Posts: 7,812
    I write a well referenced response, wasting a good hour or so of work's time, and nobody replies. Typical.
  • m.r.m.m.r.m. Posts: 1,621
    Sometimes when you do the work, there is no other opinion. You achieve acceptance. ;)B)
    PTP Champion 2019
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 44,470 Lives Here

    I write a well referenced response, wasting a good hour or so of work's time, and nobody replies. Typical.


    Hahaha yeah it’s hard to really argue with that.
  • TheBigBeanTheBigBean Posts: 8,466

    I write a well referenced response, wasting a good hour or so of work's time, and nobody replies. Typical.

    There there. I didn't completely agree (see peer critiques in your link), but I am no expert and also it's not something I care too greatly about, so I didn't think it was worth arguing about.
  • m.r.m.m.r.m. Posts: 1,621
    This is like standing in the ring with the other guy knocked out at your feet and complaining about being bored. ;):p
    PTP Champion 2019
  • fliteflite Posts: 78
    stunned into silence...
  • gsk82gsk82 Posts: 2,355

    I'm not convinced whether a race starting at 9am or 9pm makes much difference, so I would discount jetlag.

    I do think the likely 20 hours of travel can't be good preparation though.

    The time of the event makes an enormous difference. Both with relation to your individual chronotype (https://sportsmedicine-open.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s40798-018-0162-z) and to your training.

    The body adapts very well to perform at specific times, and you can use this to counteract your natural circadian rhythm to some extent (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22531613). Olympic athletes do specific training based on the time of day the event is going to be at. That's why there was a load of controversy when they changed the timings very close to the events. Even amateurs will notice this, if you do all your training in the evening you will find it initially much more difficult to train in the morning and vice-versa.

    The interaction between an individuals' circadian rhythm and athletic performance is unequivocal. So if you throw someone off by 8 hours by travelling to Japan it could have a very significant difference (this article says one study found up to 26% https://www.insidescience.org/news/time-day-could-impact-athletes-performance-peak).

    You could argue that the difference may be less significant in longer duration events like a bike race.
    This is bullshit. Theyre professional athlete not widgets.

    Is that the sort of reply you wanted?
    "Unfortunately these days a lot of people don’t understand the real quality of a bike" Ernesto Colnago
  • bobmcstuffbobmcstuff Posts: 7,812
    gsk82 said:

    I'm not convinced whether a race starting at 9am or 9pm makes much difference, so I would discount jetlag.

    I do think the likely 20 hours of travel can't be good preparation though.

    The time of the event makes an enormous difference. Both with relation to your individual chronotype (https://sportsmedicine-open.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s40798-018-0162-z) and to your training.

    The body adapts very well to perform at specific times, and you can use this to counteract your natural circadian rhythm to some extent (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22531613). Olympic athletes do specific training based on the time of day the event is going to be at. That's why there was a load of controversy when they changed the timings very close to the events. Even amateurs will notice this, if you do all your training in the evening you will find it initially much more difficult to train in the morning and vice-versa.

    The interaction between an individuals' circadian rhythm and athletic performance is unequivocal. So if you throw someone off by 8 hours by travelling to Japan it could have a very significant difference (this article says one study found up to 26% https://www.insidescience.org/news/time-day-could-impact-athletes-performance-peak).

    You could argue that the difference may be less significant in longer duration events like a bike race.
    This is bullshit. Theyre professional athlete not widgets.

    Is that the sort of reply you wanted?
    :smiley:

    I mainly wanted everyone to bow to my superior knowledge (obtained from a combination of the TrainerRoad podcast and Google).
  • LongshotLongshot Posts: 667

    I'm not convinced whether a race starting at 9am or 9pm makes much difference, so I would discount jetlag.

    I do think the likely 20 hours of travel can't be good preparation though.

    The time of the event makes an enormous difference. Both with relation to your individual chronotype (https://sportsmedicine-open.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s40798-018-0162-z) and to your training.

    The body adapts very well to perform at specific times, and you can use this to counteract your natural circadian rhythm to some extent (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22531613). Olympic athletes do specific training based on the time of day the event is going to be at. That's why there was a load of controversy when they changed the timings very close to the events. Even amateurs will notice this, if you do all your training in the evening you will find it initially much more difficult to train in the morning and vice-versa.

    The interaction between an individuals' circadian rhythm and athletic performance is unequivocal. So if you throw someone off by 8 hours by travelling to Japan it could have a very significant difference (this article says one study found up to 26% https://www.insidescience.org/news/time-day-could-impact-athletes-performance-peak).

    You could argue that the difference may be less significant in longer duration events like a bike race.

    You win the internet. Genius.

    (How's that?)
    You can fool some of the people all of the time. Concentrate on those people.
  • bobmcstuffbobmcstuff Posts: 7,812
    Better, thanks :)
  • All hail bob.
    “Road racing was over and the UCI had banned my riding positions on the track, so it was like ‘Jings, crivvens, help ma Boab, what do I do now? I know, I’ll go away and be depressed for 10 years’.”

    @DrHeadgear

    The Vikings are coming!
  • gsk82gsk82 Posts: 2,355
    Bob Bob Bob Bob Bob Bob Bob Bob Bob Bob Bob Bob Bob Bob Bob Bob Bob Bob Bob Bob
    "Unfortunately these days a lot of people don’t understand the real quality of a bike" Ernesto Colnago
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