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Winter tyres

errecaldiaerrecaldia Posts: 35
edited October 2019 in Road general
I'm determined to keep cycling through the winter, I cannot afford, health wise, to stop (cycling keep my back problems from crippling me, quite literally).

As the roads get a bit wetter and muckier, I've begun to experience wheel spin when standing on the pedals up steep slopes. I use 28mm Continental 4000s, very happy with them, but wonder if, for winter, I'd be better using a treaded tyre.

I cycle in the Pyrenean foothills, a mix of good roads, small roads through farmland and a bit of gravel. Max slope 20%.

Any advice or recommendations would be appreciated.

(Canyon CF8 Disc Endurace Disc)

Posts

  • I'd keep using those tyres and maybe look at using slightly lower pressures or staying in the saddle on those climbs.
  • mrb123mrb123 Posts: 2,386
    Those tyres are probably about as grippy on tarmac as anything you'll find in the same width.

    Do you have the clearance to go for something wider?
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    I've just got some slick Michelins for the winter. They're not good on mud and for some reason this weekend was National Mud Smearing on the road day. A bit of grip might help.
  • mrb123 wrote:
    Those tyres are probably about as grippy on tarmac as anything you'll find in the same width.

    Do you have the clearance to go for something wider?

    There is plenty of clearance for something bigger.
  • Depends on just how wintery conditions become, IMO.

    GP4000s should be fine to ~5C, but drop the pressure a fraction compared to warm, dry summer months.

    4 Seasons should be fine when ice free below ~5C, but no reason you couldn't run them in milder temps.

    When there's a risk of ice and you need to cycle, it's time for the studded tyres.
    ================
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  • mrb123mrb123 Posts: 2,386
    errecaldia wrote:
    mrb123 wrote:
    Those tyres are probably about as grippy on tarmac as anything you'll find in the same width.

    Do you have the clearance to go for something wider?

    There is plenty of clearance for something bigger.

    May be worth trying something a bit wider then.

    I have Specialized Roubaix Pros in the 30/32 size on my winter bike.

    Conti GP4 seasons are available in 32mm.

    You could also look at Panaracer Gravel Kings or Schwalbe G-One Speeds.
  • OK, it would seem from the replies and given the price, it's will be worthwhile for me to put a pair of 4 Season GPs on and see how it goes. It might save a tumble in bad weather and with a poor back, that's important.

    Many thanks, guys :)
  • errecaldia wrote:
    I'm determined to keep cycling through the winter, I cannot afford, health wise, to stop (cycling keep my back problems from crippling me, quite literally).

    As the roads get a bit wetter and muckier, I've begun to experience wheel spin when standing on the pedals up steep slopes. I use 28mm Continental 4000s, very happy with them, but wonder if, for winter, I'd be better using a treaded tyre.

    I cycle in the Pyrenean foothills, a mix of good roads, small roads through farmland and a bit of gravel. Max slope 20%. FUKKINELL!

    Any advice or recommendations would be appreciated.

    (Canyon CF8 Disc Endurace Disc)

    Get an E-bike.
    I'm not a racist! My f'in car is black!
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 11,050
    errecaldia wrote:
    OK, it would seem from the replies and given the price, it's will be worthwhile for me to put a pair of 4 Season GPs on and see how it goes. It might save a tumble in bad weather and with a poor back, that's important.

    Many thanks, guys :)
    My experience (and others apparently) with GP4S are hit and miss.
    The main reason to get them though is the compound in colder slippery conditions. There has been a couple of times when I was the only cyclist remaining upright on icy corners.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    veronese68 wrote:
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  • svettysvetty Posts: 1,904
    I don't get the slagging some people give GP4S. I rarely puncture, they last decently and the compound is grippy when the temp drops. Did P-R sportive on them at 45 PSI without a puncture........
    FFS! Harden up and grow a pair :D
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 11,050
    svetty wrote:
    I don't get the slagging some people give GP4S.
    I have had ones that have been perfect.
    I have had ones that literally fell apart. Hit and miss.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • pblakeney wrote:
    svetty wrote:
    I don't get the slagging some people give GP4S.
    I have had ones that have been perfect.
    I have had ones that literally fell apart. Hit and miss.

    I have had similar experiences (more with punctures and cutting up more than falling apart)...which is fair enough if they weren't so expensive
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,286
    I found GP4S brilliant in terms of puncture protection and winter grip when new, but as they aged they'd suddenly give up the ghost and the tread would start coming off in chunks long before it was worn out. Maybe I was hanging on to them too long?
  • drhaggisdrhaggis Posts: 785
    Whereabouts in the pyreneans? With that username, euskal herrian?

    You won't need threaded tires in normal tarmac, as the risk of aquaplanning on road tires at regular cycling speeds is pretty much non-existent. Winter tires should offer improved wet weather grip, but the real change is seen at temperatures near freezing.

    GP4S are nice, and grip quite well below 5 C in comparison to other tires. Bear in mind you'll probably feel the additional rolling resistance.
  • The tyre may be slipping due to your weight not being over the rear of the bike. Maybe stay seated or put weight towards the rear.
    I commuted to London all year round on a set of Continental Gator Hardshells and didn't have a puncture in 5500 miles. They can be a bit dodgy in the wet but just go carefully and avoid white lines and manhole covers. I also recommend Specialized Armadillos for the winter, good puncture protection.
  • Gatorskin hatdshell the tyre that inspires fear when you see white lines, manhole, water or a bend. Otherwise they are fine. Used them once and they turned out to be so so. All the down side of a gatorskin whither few upside. Not even that durable.
  • zest28zest28 Posts: 130
    edited November 2019
    Buy a gravel bike. Using 40mm+ tyres with thread, you got all the grip you need in the winter and wet conditions.
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