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Replace the wheels?

johngtijohngti Posts: 762
edited October 2019 in Road general
Bit stuck on a decision. I came close to quitting cycling over the last year but I’m starting to feel better about it again (two Sunday rides in a row for the first time in ages!). I’ve got a really nice summer bike and I’ve just bought a new winter bike, a giant contend sl2 disc. While I’m impressed by the package, I’m not sure I’m enjoying the wheels. They’re giant’s pr2 disc wheels, so fairly deep rims for aluminium and as a result they feel really heavy going up hill. This is a problem given the number of short sharp climbs on my routes.

Did a little experiment yesterday where I freewheeled down a slope and had a look at how far I’d continue to go on a slight uphill. The answer was not far! I know it’s partly due to needing to rebuild some ride fitness but my word it’s hard work getting the rear wheel accelerating, it just feels heavy and too much like hard work.

I’m thinking about swapping the wheels. I realise that one argument is to keep going, that it’ll get better as I get fitter and I’ll fly when I get back on the summer bike but against that, I want to enjoy the rides I go on now too and not just feel like I’m doing strength training every week (that’ll get dull - part of the reason to ride is to relieve some work stress)

The bike was £700. A pair of Campagnolo scirocco wheels can be had for £260. That seems like a decent balance, no? Or am I kidding myself and should just save my money or get a nice pair of tubeless tyres instead?

I’d appreciate thoughts either way. Thanks!

Posts

  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 10,835
    If you only ride once a week, new wheels (regardless of the price) will make absolutely no difference to you whatsoever.
  • johngtijohngti Posts: 762
    It’s not going to stay at once a week - building back up to around 3 rides. I was on 4 per week before work started getting in the way, 2500+ miles per year. May not quite get there again but aiming for somewhere close.
  • johngtijohngti Posts: 762
    And, since I’ve just had a crappy car journey thanks to idiots who think they own the road and I feel like an argument, what’s the number of weekly rides got to do with it? Are you honestly claiming that if I were to get to 60+ miles every Sunday that somehow a nice set of wheels won’t improve the experience? Pah.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 10,835
    johngti wrote:
    And, since I’ve just had a crappy car journey thanks to idiots who think they own the road and I feel like an argument, what’s the number of weekly rides got to do with it? Are you honestly claiming that if I were to get to 60+ miles every Sunday that somehow a nice set of wheels won’t improve the experience? Pah.

    Not sure if you're joking or not but yes, I am suggesting that, pretty much. No offence, but if you need a new set of wheels in order for you to enjoy your sunday ride, then you need to consider if you have the right hobby.
  • Its your money, if buying new wheels and tyres will make you happier then so be it.
    Just don't expect the kinds of dramatic improvements that the marketing from the manufacturers promise.
  • johngtijohngti Posts: 762
    Imposter wrote:
    johngti wrote:
    And, since I’ve just had a crappy car journey thanks to idiots who think they own the road and I feel like an argument, what’s the number of weekly rides got to do with it? Are you honestly claiming that if I were to get to 60+ miles every Sunday that somehow a nice set of wheels won’t improve the experience? Pah.

    Not sure if you're joking or not but yes, I am suggesting that, pretty much. No offence, but if you need a new set of wheels in order for you to enjoy your sunday ride, then you need to consider if you have the right hobby.

    Only half joking! When do nice, light, comfortable wheels start making a difference? Heavy and difficult to spin up on one side, leading to strength training over winter vs something light and easier to get up to speed thereby making the whole ride more enjoyable and less like a slow grind. That’s the argument. Obviously I know full well that wheels are just one part of the whole thing and that the best way to get fitter is riding the bike and, new wheels or not, that’s where I’m heading.
  • Just started riding the winter bike again. Strewth it is heavy and slow. Now, 3 weeks later, I don't notice it. Did 80 hilly miles on Saturday at the same pace as on my summer bike.
    It's all in the mind. And don't even consider what the guys you ride with will think. If spending a load of money will make you happy then go for it. But don't expect to see any major performance increases.
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,147
    You would get fitter with one ride a week - but obv its faster with more training.

    You'll have to spend more money to make it noticeable on the wheels I reckon. Weigh yourself and the frame and then the wheels. I'm betting that you and the rest of the bike is the vast majority of the weight.

    What tyres and PSI are you riding ? Thats a cheaper option.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 10,835
    johngti wrote:
    Imposter wrote:
    johngti wrote:
    And, since I’ve just had a crappy car journey thanks to idiots who think they own the road and I feel like an argument, what’s the number of weekly rides got to do with it? Are you honestly claiming that if I were to get to 60+ miles every Sunday that somehow a nice set of wheels won’t improve the experience? Pah.

    Not sure if you're joking or not but yes, I am suggesting that, pretty much. No offence, but if you need a new set of wheels in order for you to enjoy your sunday ride, then you need to consider if you have the right hobby.

    Only half joking! When do nice, light, comfortable wheels start making a difference? Heavy and difficult to spin up on one side, leading to strength training over winter vs something light and easier to get up to speed thereby making the whole ride more enjoyable and less like a slow grind. That’s the argument. Obviously I know full well that wheels are just one part of the whole thing and that the best way to get fitter is riding the bike and, new wheels or not, that’s where I’m heading.

    If that's the argument, then it's a fallacy. The realistic and real world differences in performance between 'light' wheels and 'heavy' wheels is practically undetectable..
  • johngtijohngti Posts: 762
    Yeah. Valid points all. Definitely going to go tubeless with what I’ve got though
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    Tubeless is another discussion altogether.
  • johngtijohngti Posts: 762
    I’m familiar with tubeless and am definitely a fan so that’s the way I’d go new wheels or no. Think I’m going to stick with the wheels and get decent tyres.
  • david7mdavid7m Posts: 635
    Your weight, tyre width and current psi?
  • johngtijohngti Posts: 762
    david7m wrote:
    Your weight, tyre width and current psi?

    The cycling forum version of ASL?

    83kg, 28mm and 80/75 rear/front
  • david7mdavid7m Posts: 635
    johngti wrote:
    david7m wrote:
    Your weight, tyre width and current psi?

    The cycling forum version of ASL?

    83kg, 28mm and 80/75 rear/front

    Not sure what ASL is, but pressures are good :)
  • johngtijohngti Posts: 762
    Age/Sex/Location :)

    Yeah, i'm no beginner. Guess I needed someone to tell me to go for it and then happy days!! I'll be getting tubeless in 28mm and probably run them at slightly lower pressures than this.
  • johngtijohngti Posts: 762
    Just to properly draw a line under this discussion, I went ahead and bought some gp5000tl tyres in 28mm and fitted them to the stock wheels and they’ve made a positive difference. They certainly rolled more easily although I could still feel the weight of the rear wheel at 5%+ gradients. Sticking with the giant wheels for the foreseeable. I’m seriously impressed by the value for money in the bike - the conduct brakes look awful but work brilliantly.

    Anyway, thanks for the input
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