Weight reduction advice on new Specialized Roubaix

gpkf
gpkf Posts: 9
edited September 2019 in Road buying advice
Hello fellow cyclists,

I bought this year's Specialized Roubaix Comp (ultegra) Di2 and specced the standard DT Swiss 470 wheels with 32mm Roubaix Pro (tubeless) tyres. I also specced the MTB SWAT kit (spares box and a pair of bottle cages). The area I ride is a mix of tarmac and gravel sections hence the choice of bike and tyres. The route I use has considerable cross/head winds as well as a fair number of 5% - 7% gradients.

This current setup has resulted in a bike weight of 9.4kg with the complete front and rear wheel/tyre assembly (incl. disc brake and cassette) weighing 1.4kg and 1.9kg respectively. I'm now exploring how I can shave some weight by getting a set of carbon wheels with 'thinner' tubeless tyres (still deciding between 25mm and 28mm). I'm limiting myself budget-wise to wheelsets such as Roval CLX 50 as the ceiling.

I'd appreciate some advice/opinions on the following wheelsets as well as any other I should consider in a similar price bracket. So far I've looked at the following:
Campagnolo Bora 35, Fulcrum Racing Speed 40, Token Prime Ventous (36mm), Roval C38, Roval CLX 50.

Am I correct in thinking 50mm wheel depth is about the max I should consider given my weight (68kg) and riding conditions I encounter on majority of my rides?

Comments

  • Drop to 65kg and you'll lose 3kg.
    Lose a cage and you'll drop another kilo.
    Leave the spares box at home and just take a tube and mini pump.
  • gpkf
    gpkf Posts: 9
    Drop to 65kg and you'll lose 3kg.
    Lose a cage and you'll drop another kilo.
    Leave the spares box at home and just take a tube and mini pump.

    :D:D thanks for that - 68kg is about my ideal weight. I suspect a cage and SWAT box won't make much a difference. Given the distances I ride - 60km+ I'd rather carry 2 bottles :D:D
  • sparquin
    sparquin Posts: 69
    It might be a bit more work, but if you weigh the wheels without tyres, cassette, brake rotors etc. you'll have a better idea of how much weight you can save there.
    I saved about half a kilogram with a lower spec Roubaix a few years back by swapping to Campag Zondas.
  • gpkf
    gpkf Posts: 9
    Sparquin wrote:
    It might be a bit more work, but if you weigh the wheels without tyres, cassette, brake rotors etc. you'll have a better idea of how much weight you can save there.
    I saved about half a kilogram with a lower spec Roubaix a few years back by swapping to Campag Zondas.

    Thanks for the wheelset suggestion.
    I neglected to mention that I created a spreadsheet where I did precisely that - listed weights of the various bits and pieces down to an estimate of the weight of the slime in the present tyres. I then list any wheelset I’m interested in and calculate any weight saving including ‘thinner’ tyres on the new wheelset.
  • gethinceri
    gethinceri Posts: 1,550
    Using the manufacturer's published weights? That would be very trusting.
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    Why is the weight such an issue for you? What benefits are you expecting from such a reduction? You could have just bought a lighter bike...
  • joe_totale-2
    joe_totale-2 Posts: 1,333
    I'd get a new bike without disc brakes, suspension and a lunchbox if you want something lighter.
    I thought no one really bought a Roubaix with the intention of it being a weight weenie machine. It's great at being a solid, comfortable mile muncher but for that I'd say fitness is more important than weight.
  • Matthewfalle
    Matthewfalle Posts: 17,380
    Joe Totale wrote:
    I'd get a new bike without disc brakes, suspension and a lunchbox if you want something lighter.
    I thought no one really bought a Roubaix with the intention of it being a weight weenie machine. It's great at being a solid, comfortable mile muncher but for that I'd say fitness is more important than weight.

    this.

    its a bit of a tank as standard so fighting a bit of a losing battle really.

    #listentoJoe
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • StillGoing
    StillGoing Posts: 5,211
    How tall are you for 68kg? Losing weight is the cheapest option and most advantageous for fitness.

    https://www.wenzelcoaching.com/blog/cyc ... ght-chart/

    Accepting that you've bought a heavy bike, your options are ditching the bits you really don't need for 50-60km rides. Lighter wheels, preferably tubular. Although Di2 is great, it is heavy, so switch to something mechanical from SRAM which is generally lighter than Shimano or Campagnolo.
    I ride a bike. Doesn't make me green or a tree hugger. I drive a car too.
  • Matthewfalle
    Matthewfalle Posts: 17,380
    philthy3 wrote:
    How tall are you for 68kg? Losing weight is the cheapest option and most advantageous for fitness.

    https://www.wenzelcoaching.com/blog/cyc ... ght-chart/

    Accepting that you've bought a heavy bike, your options are ditching the bits you really don't need for 50-60km rides. Lighter wheels, preferably tubular. Although Di2 is great, it is heavy, so switch to something mechanical from SRAM which is generally lighter than Shimano or Campagnolo.


    as per this - perfect would also to be ditching discs as you don't really need them but you're stuck with them.

    then lighter saddle, seat post, bars, stem, pedals, cranks, etc but by this time you'll have spent so much and still have a Roubaix.

    #hefty
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • lakesluddite
    lakesluddite Posts: 1,337
    "Am I correct in thinking 50mm wheel depth is about the max I should consider given my weight (68kg) and riding conditions I encounter on majority of my rides?"

    Not sure what you mean by this?

    For general riding, I don't think you would need/want anything over a 50mm rim depth - anything above 50-55mm would usually be for TT/Tri set-ups. Are you thinking that a bigger rim profile would act more like a sail with a light(ish) rider? Not much these days I think. I have 60mm rims on a bike that I use for tri, and can notice a little more movement in crosswinds, but fairly negligible, and I am 60kg. If you are concerned about the crosswinds, then obviously go for a narrower profile - the aero gains between 50mm and 38mm are negligible.

    If you do want the combination of light weight and deep rim profile, you could save yourself a few (hundred) quid and consider these?

    https://www.wiggle.co.uk/prime-blackedi ... -wheelset/
  • gpkf
    gpkf Posts: 9
    Gethinceri wrote:
    Using the manufacturer's published weights? That would be very trusting.

    Indeed it would :)
    I try to cross reference with equipment reviews and feedback from owners where possible.
  • gpkf
    gpkf Posts: 9
    philthy3 wrote:
    How tall are you for 68kg? Losing weight is the cheapest option and most advantageous for fitness.

    https://www.wenzelcoaching.com/blog/cyc ... ght-chart/

    Accepting that you've bought a heavy bike, your options are ditching the bits you really don't need for 50-60km rides. Lighter wheels, preferably tubular. Although Di2 is great, it is heavy, so switch to something mechanical from SRAM which is generally lighter than Shimano or Campagnolo.

    168cm - if I refer to the ideal weights on the linked chart, I could still lose a few kg to be in the climber's range. Perhaps in time. When conditions allow (not so blustery), I do ride up to 100km. Yes I have made peace with my tank :D but lighter wheels with better hubs will make it just that little bit better I think.
  • gpkf
    gpkf Posts: 9
    "Am I correct in thinking 50mm wheel depth is about the max I should consider given my weight (68kg) and riding conditions I encounter on majority of my rides?"

    Not sure what you mean by this?

    For general riding, I don't think you would need/want anything over a 50mm rim depth - anything above 50-55mm would usually be for TT/Tri set-ups. Are you thinking that a bigger rim profile would act more like a sail with a light(ish) rider? Not much these days I think. I have 60mm rims on a bike that I use for tri, and can notice a little more movement in crosswinds, but fairly negligible, and I am 60kg. If you are concerned about the crosswinds, then obviously go for a narrower profile - the aero gains between 50mm and 38mm are negligible.

    If you do want the combination of light weight and deep rim profile, you could save yourself a few (hundred) quid and consider these?

    https://www.wiggle.co.uk/prime-blackedi ... -wheelset/

    Thank you for the wheelset suggestion! :)
    My concern is precisely that - stability in crosswinds. Hence limiting myself to 50mm rim depth. The crosswinds on my route can get up to 12mph and although I'm finding out that I'm categorised as a light(ish) rider :D, there have been moments where I have felt the bike was getting swept to one side from underneath me. I wonder how I'd fare with 60mm deep wheels? :)
  • david7m
    david7m Posts: 636
    I think you're 95% there already, the last bit is going to be very expensive.
    Just enjoy it :)
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    gpkf wrote:
    I wonder how I'd fare with 60mm deep wheels? :)

    'Lightweight' and 'deep section' don't always go together....
  • step83
    step83 Posts: 4,170
    Imposter wrote:
    gpkf wrote:
    I wonder how I'd fare with 60mm deep wheels? :)

    'Lightweight' and 'deep section' don't always go together....

    60's will be heavier, as said lightweight and deep section don't mix, just get some shallow alloy rims, solid an stable should be able to get them close to the 1.4Kg mark without spending out money similar to the CLX 50's

    Contact points and cages really after that. But even then don't expect miracles though the bike is build heavy, the fork suspension alone will count toward a decent chunk of it. Along with the spingy seatpost
  • Sell the roubaix.
  • Matthewfalle
    Matthewfalle Posts: 17,380
    Sell the roubaix.

    this

    #weighty
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • It's not a heavy bike for what it is.
    Why 32c tyres may be a good place to start?
    I specced these on my Roubaix, and switched to 28c Specialized turbo pro tubeless. Totally transformed the bike.
    That's with mavic ksyrium elites so an upgrade but nothing as fancy as the rovals.
    Sure there maybe times when I may want to venture further from the blacktop, but I bought a diverge for less than the rovals!
    Whatever, enjoy it and remember that the heaviest part of any bike is the rider. . Unless it's a full suss mtb from sports'r'us
  • bmxboy10
    bmxboy10 Posts: 1,958
    Joe Totale wrote:
    I'd get a new bike without disc brakes, suspension and a lunchbox if you want something lighter.
    I thought no one really bought a Roubaix with the intention of it being a weight weenie machine. It's great at being a solid, comfortable mile muncher but for that I'd say fitness is more important than weight.
    Exactly this. My Roubaux Expert is a very good bike but more heavy than expected for a bike with a £3900 rrp! First thing I did was sell the SWAT box and changed to a high end Toupe saddle. I’d just accept it’s a heavyweight bike and if you want a lightweight racer I’d invest in a n+1.
  • gpkf
    gpkf Posts: 9
    It's not a heavy bike for what it is.
    Why 32c tyres may be a good place to start?
    I specced these on my Roubaix, and switched to 28c Specialized turbo pro tubeless. Totally transformed the bike.
    That's with mavic ksyrium elites so an upgrade but nothing as fancy as the rovals.
    Sure there maybe times when I may want to venture further from the blacktop, but I bought a diverge for less than the rovals!
    Whatever, enjoy it and remember that the heaviest part of any bike is the rider. . Unless it's a full suss mtb from sports'r'us

    I initially specced 32c tyres due to the area I ride thru - a mix of tarmac and some gravel. Thanks for confirming the difference lighter tyres can make! :D
  • gpkf
    gpkf Posts: 9
    BMXboy10 wrote:
    Joe Totale wrote:
    I'd get a new bike without disc brakes, suspension and a lunchbox if you want something lighter.
    I thought no one really bought a Roubaix with the intention of it being a weight weenie machine. It's great at being a solid, comfortable mile muncher but for that I'd say fitness is more important than weight.
    Exactly this. My Roubaux Expert is a very good bike but more heavy than expected for a bike with a £3900 rrp! First thing I did was sell the SWAT box and changed to a high end Toupe saddle. I’d just accept it’s a heavyweight bike and if you want a lightweight racer I’d invest in a n+1.

    Yeep...considering the n+1 option :D and thanks for the saddle tip. Currently on a Power Arc...
  • Just get a set of 28 mm deep alloy hunt wheels and fit some nice 28 or 30mm road tyres and you are good. Probably lighter than your current set up, will roll well, and no issues with crosswinds.

    I find I am affected by crosswinds, and I'm not light. Taking that issue away with a small front rim improves my enjoyment of descending. sadly doesn't look as good as my old cosmic carbones though.
  • You don't generally really need x2 bottles for 60km rides...

    (IMO)
  • You don't generally really need x2 bottles for 60km rides...

    (IMO)

    There might be a few factors like temperature; Normalised Power; Intensity etc. that affect that neccessity... Not to mention the volume capacity of your water bottles. :wink:
    ================
    2020 Voodoo Marasa
    2017 Cube Attain GTC Pro Disc 2016
    2016 Voodoo Wazoo
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    You don't generally really need x2 bottles for 60km rides...

    (IMO)

    Depends on the time of year for me. In the summer, should we get one, I can get through 2 bottles in 60k.

    I think trying to turn a Roubaix into a light bike is a futile exercise
  • You don't generally really need x2 bottles for 60km rides...

    (IMO)

    There might be a few factors like temperature; Normalised Power; Intensity etc. that affect that neccessity... Not to mention the volume capacity of your water bottles. :wink:

    Yep, generally speaking of course....

    I'm also assuming he/she is well hydrated pre-ride in the first place.

    I am a bit of a camel though I guess lol. 3hrs/ 60 miles and two standard sized bottles are plenty.... :oops:
  • Came across this thread and my opinion is making your bike lighter gives you more of a physiological boost than physical. It’s like remapping your car to get an extra 10% bhp - great for a few days but then you get used to it. Only real difference is when you buy a brand new car.

    Just be happy with whatever your bike weighs and remember you have it setup how you want and the ‘extra weight’ will make you stronger too
    Specialized Roubaix Pro Expert 2020
    Boardman HT Pro Ltd Ed MTB
    Boardman Pro Carbon Road Bike (Turbo Trainer)
    Charge Mixer
  • slowmart
    slowmart Posts: 4,488
    edited December 2020
    Lighter weight is a rabbit hole that gets expensive with diminishing returns.

    The wiser investment would be to work on your fitness, consider swapping your rear cassette for one with more teeth with some lighter tyres.

    As for the difference between CL & CLX are aero spokes and ceramic bearings. Unless your average speed is 40kmph aero is a world of diminishing returns as your average speed reduces.
    “Give a man a fish and feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and feed him for a lifetime. Teach a man to cycle and he will realize fishing is stupid and boring”

    Desmond Tutu