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Underactive thyroid

DeVlaeminckDeVlaeminck Posts: 5,595
edited August 2019 in The cake stop
I have on occasion asked for medical advice from this forum and accepting that it should never be an alternative to seeing a doctor I've always found the opinion of you lot to be useful.

So...my eldest daughter has for the past 3 years or so been on a very low dose of levothyroxine for an underactive thyroid. This was prescribed by her GP when she went for another issue and he noticed her neck was slightly swollen. It did explain why she'd been so fatigued and put on a bit of weight. Obviously you dont want your kids to be diagnosed with a lifetime condition but she has been much more like herself since and has lost a good stone plus and would be a fair racing weight of she was a cyclist.

She's off to McGill uni in Montreal in a couple of weeks and has just been told bu her GP that her latest blood test indicates she no longer needs levothyroxine. So happy days? Her underactive thyroid is no more, she is no more dependent on daily medication....except she was told this is a lifetime condition and is now stressed she's heading off to Canada without the medication she thinks she may need.

She's seeing the GP tomorrow - is this normal - were they wrong to tell her it was forever or should she be concerned that she's going to go back to being fatigued every evening?

As I say she is seeing the GP - this isn't insted of professional medical advice.
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  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 16,896
    I have on occasion asked for medical advice from this forum and accepting that it should never be an alternative to seeing a doctor I've always found the opinion of you lot to be useful.

    So...my eldest daughter has for the past 3 years or so been on a very low dose of levothyroxine for an underactive thyroid. This was prescribed by her GP when she went for another issue and he noticed her neck was slightly swollen. It did explain why she'd been so fatigued and put on a bit of weight. Obviously you dont want your kids to be diagnosed with a lifetime condition but she has been much more like herself since and has lost a good stone plus and would be a fair racing weight of she was a cyclist.

    She's off to McGill uni in Montreal in a couple of weeks and has just been told bu her GP that her latest blood test indicates she no longer needs levothyroxine. So happy days? Her underactive thyroid is no more, she is no more dependent on daily medication....except she was told this is a lifetime condition and is now stressed she's heading off to Canada without the medication she thinks she may need.

    She's seeing the GP tomorrow - is this normal - were they wrong to tell her it was forever or should she be concerned that she's going to go back to being fatigued every evening?

    As I say she is seeing the GP - this isn't insted of professional medical advice.

    Purely from a logical point of view, "lifetime condition" is not the same as "requires continual treatment for the patient's entire life". I stress this is with no knowledge of hypothyroidism, but it may be possible for the condition to persist at a level where no treatment is needed for some period(s).
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    1980s BSA 10sp

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • LagrangeLagrange Posts: 652
    My wife had the same when younger and took medication and made some lifestyle changes and does not take medication. But she has been tested from time to time when she feels 'funny' and the tests show the condition but below the threshold for medication.

    Your daughter should worry - it is a natural response but as with students everywhere there will be a med centre that can take this forward. She should not take pills with her and decide when she needs them. This does not help.

    McGill is in a nice place! Hope it costs you a fortune! :D
  • webboowebboo Posts: 2,125
    My wife was diagnosed with this in her early fifties and was told she needed medication for the rest of her life. She was given a medical exception certificate for medication because of this. I would get your daughter to write down all the questions she has before she sees her gp, then when she is having her consultation. She can go through them all writing down the answers, so she then be clear what’s going on. Or take someone with her for her appointment.
  • DeVlaeminckDeVlaeminck Posts: 5,595
    Thanks all. I suggested her mum going with her but no chance - she is very strong headed about handling stuff herself even though even older adults need support at times she doesn't see it that way.

    Yes McGill is costing a bit but it's just an exchange - she's actually at Liverpool - so only there til Christmas. She insists on working full time every holiday to pay for as much herself as she can - then my parents gave given her a "contribution " so probably not costing me and her mum much at all, unfortunately the younger two don't share her work ethic.
    AFC Mercia women - sign for us
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