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Which inner tubes ?

_Chris__Chris_ Posts: 10
edited July 2019 in MTB buying advice
What's the current recommendations for great inner tubes please ?

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  • kiniookinioo Posts: 776
    _Chris_ wrote:
    What's the current recommendations for great inner tubes please ?

    Have no idea, running tubeless and never looked back!
  • JBAJBA Posts: 2,608
    For what bike, what wheel size and what intended use?
    “Life has been unfaithful
    And it all promised so so much”

    Giant Trance 2 27.5 2016 ¦ Bird Zero Mk1 ¦ Giant Revolt Advanced 2 2019 ¦ Giant Anthem 3 2015 ¦ Specialized Myka Comp FSR 2009
  • _Chris__Chris_ Posts: 10
    MTB, 26inch, roads and cross country.
  • billycoolbillycool Posts: 833
    _Chris_ wrote:
    MTB, 26inch, roads and cross country.

    I've always bought standard tubes from places like Halfords as the branded ones that I've used like Specialized seem exactly the same. You can get slime ones if you are prone to puncture, but they do cost and weigh more.

    I now run tubeless on both sets of 26" wheels and can highly recommend it. I have a lot of hawthorn where I am and it makes such a difference.
    "Ride, crash, replace"
  • _Chris__Chris_ Posts: 10
    billycool wrote:
    _Chris_ wrote:
    MTB, 26inch, roads and cross country.

    I've always bought standard tubes from places like Halfords as the branded ones that I've used like Specialized seem exactly the same. You can get slime ones if you are prone to puncture, but they do cost and weigh more.

    I now run tubeless on both sets of 26" wheels and can highly recommend it. I have a lot of hawthorn where I am and it makes such a difference.
    Thanks buddy, some good info there, I imagine I'll need to get different tyres?
  • david7mdavid7m Posts: 636
    I used to use Vavert before I went tubeless, no issues with it.
  • jamskijamski Posts: 737
    £2.50 ones from Halfords. But you should really be tubeless. :)
    Daddy, Husband, Designer, Biker, Gamer, Geek
    Bird Aeris 120 | Boardman Team 650b | Boardman Pro FS | Calibre Two.two
  • _Chris__Chris_ Posts: 10
    Do I need different tyres to go tubeless?
  • david7mdavid7m Posts: 636
    _Chris_ wrote:
    Do I need different tyres to go tubeless?

    Not sure what you have now, but tubeless have specific tyres and rim requirements.
  • billycoolbillycool Posts: 833
    _Chris_ wrote:
    billycool wrote:
    _Chris_ wrote:
    MTB, 26inch, roads and cross country.

    I've always bought standard tubes from places like Halfords as the branded ones that I've used like Specialized seem exactly the same. You can get slime ones if you are prone to puncture, but they do cost and weigh more.

    I now run tubeless on both sets of 26" wheels and can highly recommend it. I have a lot of hawthorn where I am and it makes such a difference.
    Thanks buddy, some good info there, I imagine I'll need to get different tyres?

    If you wanted to go tubeless you would need to check if your rims were `tubeless ready`. Even if they are not, you can do a `ghetto` fix. You'll need rim tape (a lot of us us Gorilla tape), tubeless valves and some sealant.

    You would probably need tubeless ready tyres, although some non-tubeless can be used (you sometimes need to chuck in some extra sealant as the tyre walls can be a bit porous). Tubeless tyres are generally a bit easier to work with.

    As you run 26" - you can get some good prices on tubeless tyres - Specialized have a sale on some of their 2Bliss range.

    https://www.specialized.com/gb/en/shop/ ... esult-list

    The benefits are that you can pick up thorns etc and you just lose a little bit of air, the tyre seals and you carry on. Get home and whack some more air in. Don't bother pulling them out usually. They just stay in place. My mate had a record 12 thorns in his tyre when he changed it.

    You can also run lower tyre pressures (if that's your thing).

    Some love tubeless and others don't see the benefit. For the sort of riding I do, it's a huge plus.
    "Ride, crash, replace"
  • larkimlarkim Posts: 2,283
    +1 for tubeless simply as a massive boost to convenience in terms of reducing punctures and tube outlays. Done 4x sets of wheels, all on stock wheels (i.e. not tubeless specific) and 50% of the time with non-tubeless designated tyres.
    2015 Canyon Nerve AL 6.0 (son #1's)
    2011 Specialized Hardrock Sport Disc (son #3s)
    2013 Decathlon Triban 3 (red) (mine)
    2019 Hoy Bonaly 26" Disc (son #2s)
    2018 Voodoo Bizango (mine)
    2018 Voodoo Maji (wife's)
  • steve_sordysteve_sordy Posts: 1,943
    +1 for tubeless, I don't consider anything else. Usually bikes come with tubes, but the first job is to convert to tubeless. Billy Cool pretty much covered what you have to do. But if you have difficulties, it can seem like a black art which no amount of swearing and cursing will help. But let YiuTube be your guide (and here!)

    Ref the punctures: Going tubeless will not stop punctures, but it will stop flats (mostly). I hedge my bets there because in the ten years or so that I have been tubeless, a tubeless tyre has deflated twice. Both instances were due to a fault in the tyre that was claimed under warranty. Each tyre tore at the bead in the same place with respect to the logo. The hole was big enough to get four fingers through - not fixable!

    My record for punctures was over two dozen punctures in each tyre, but no flats! How could I tell? After leaving the bike standing for a few days, the sealant caused a small damp patch where each puncture was and I could count them.
  • LagrangeLagrange Posts: 652
    If you are 26 inch or 27.5 then use freeride tubes. Heavier but I just don't get punctures with them. Can't get these tubes for 29 inch.
  • mattyfezmattyfez Posts: 638
    Anecdotal but I had puncture issues with cheaper ones, switched to regular continental tubes and have been fine ever since!. Bit more expensive but less hasslee in the long run in my experience.
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