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Could simply walking a bike with a flat tyre damage the sidewall?

bungle73bungle73 Posts: 740
edited June 2019 in Road general
A few months ago I had to replace a tyre that had a cut in the sidewall, which I put down to riding the bike when it was flat, so I replaced it. Today I was out on my bike and almost home, when I heard a loud bang and then a hissing noise as I my tyre quickly deflated. This time I thought better of trying to ride it, so I got off and walked the ~1 mle home. Because home was so close I didn't think it worth stopping to repair it on the spot. Having got home I inspected the tyre and removed a few items embedded in the tyre that I thought may have caused the puncture. However, I also found a cut in the sidewall, maybe about 1.25 cm long. Now I'm wondering if that happened pre or post puncture. The cut only seems to go through the rubber, and not through the lining, but I'm guessing I'm going to have to replace it anyway? I think it's actually the tyre I only bought a few months ago to replace that last one that had a cut in it...........

Posts

  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 25,092
    I once rode 5 miles on a flat Brompton tyre to no ill effect... so I'd say no
  • bungle73bungle73 Posts: 740
    I once rode 5 miles on a flat Brompton tyre to no ill effect... so I'd say no

    Yeah, but this is a lightweight Pirelli P Zero Velo.

    I did ride through some debris that looked like the remnants of a car collision a few miles prior to that, and there was some glass on the road. I guess that could have cut the tyre? Except the cut looked the same as the previous sidewall cuts I had, diagonal and the same size.
  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,571
    no. it will not.

    caveat: normal unladen bike will be fine. stick a 40kg rucksack on it and things will obviously be different.

    #no
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • bungle73bungle73 Posts: 740
    OK. Thanks.
  • mrfpbmrfpb Posts: 4,476
    I once rode 5 miles on a flat Brompton tyre to no ill effect... so I'd say no
    I've ridden 2 - 3 miles on a flat 25mm tyre without damaging the tyre further. Presumably it's possible to do damage, but as OP said, he'll be checking it over when fixing the puncture.
  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,571
    you're more likely to do damage to the rim than the tyre totes tbh, see.
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 12,706
    Looks at who the OP is.
    Walks away from the thread...
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • homers_doublehomers_double Posts: 6,573
    Sure you walked or did you ride off on a deflated post?
    Advocate of disc brakes.
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    I know someone who rode a few miles on a flat tubular tyre on his carbon disc wheel. He destroyed it and I think won £20 for third place.

    I'd not ride any distance on a flat tyre. Walking isn't an issue.
  • step83step83 Posts: 3,867
    Simple answer, no bike doesn't weigh enough for the rim edge to cut through the tyre. If your that worried CX it an lob it over your shoulder.
  • First.AspectFirst.Aspect Posts: 4,325
    Did you leave the tyre out in the sun, or wash it with anything other than warm water? That could be the problem.
  • bungle73bungle73 Posts: 740
    Did you leave the tyre out in the sun,
    No. But most people's bikes are out in the sun when they ride them, no?
    or wash it with anything other than warm water? That could be the problem.

    Like what? I wash them with the same thing I wash the rest of the bike with: car shampoo.
  • First.AspectFirst.Aspect Posts: 4,325
    bungle73 wrote:
    car shampoo.
    Ah, should've use bike shampoo. Except on the tyres, obs.
  • darkhairedlorddarkhairedlord Posts: 5,533
    Is there any sign of cracking on the sidewall? Excessive flexing from a deflated tyre, especially when wet and exposed to sunlight can damage the internal structure.
  • joe_totale-2joe_totale-2 Posts: 1,057
    What weight are the sidewalls rated for? I mean cycling with a 40kg backpack on may have placed too much stress upon them hence compromising them.
  • darkhairedlorddarkhairedlord Posts: 5,533
    I blame Merlin.
    Send them back.
  • lesfirthlesfirth Posts: 1,077
    bungle73 wrote:
    Did you leave the tyre out in the sun,
    No. But most people's bikes are out in the sun when they ride them, no?
    or wash it with anything other than warm water? That could be the problem.

    Like what? I wash them with the same thing I wash the rest of the bike with: car shampoo.

    I can't work out who is doing the winding up. :lol:
  • bungle73bungle73 Posts: 740
    Is there any sign of cracking on the sidewall? Excessive flexing from a deflated tyre, especially when wet and exposed to sunlight can damage the internal structure.

    I haven't left them deflated.
  • bungle73bungle73 Posts: 740
    lesfirth wrote:
    bungle73 wrote:
    Did you leave the tyre out in the sun,
    No. But most people's bikes are out in the sun when they ride them, no?
    or wash it with anything other than warm water? That could be the problem.

    Like what? I wash them with the same thing I wash the rest of the bike with: car shampoo.

    I can't work out who is doing the winding up. :lol:

    How the hell is saying I use car shampoo......as do many, many other people.....to wash my bike a "wind up"??????
  • First.AspectFirst.Aspect Posts: 4,325
    bungle73 wrote:
    Is there any sign of cracking on the sidewall? Excessive flexing from a deflated tyre, especially when wet and exposed to sunlight can damage the internal structure.

    I haven't left them deflated.
    That means they've been exposed to oxygen in the air over a long period. This will oxidize the rubber and they will perish from the inside out. You need to use CO2, like all the pros. Team Ineos (Sky) use xenon but that's really expensive and adds to global warming.
  • bungle73bungle73 Posts: 740
    bungle73 wrote:
    Is there any sign of cracking on the sidewall? Excessive flexing from a deflated tyre, especially when wet and exposed to sunlight can damage the internal structure.

    I haven't left them deflated.
    That means they've been exposed to oxygen in the air over a long period. This will oxidize the rubber and they will perish from the inside out. You need to use CO2, like all the pros. Team Ineos (Sky) use xenon but that's really expensive and adds to global warming.

    Riiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiight.
  • PhilipPirripPhilipPirrip Posts: 616
    bungle73 wrote:
    Is there any sign of cracking on the sidewall? Excessive flexing from a deflated tyre, especially when wet and exposed to sunlight can damage the internal structure.

    I haven't left them deflated.
    Good. It's important to bolster the psychological wellbeing of your tyres.

    A happy tyre is a fast rolling tyre.
  • darkhairedlorddarkhairedlord Posts: 5,533
    bungle73 wrote:
    Is there any sign of cracking on the sidewall? Excessive flexing from a deflated tyre, especially when wet and exposed to sunlight can damage the internal structure.

    I haven't left them deflated.

    Thats no the problem, its rolling the bike along, loaded or unloaded, while they are deflated (after a puncture) that will damage the side walls.
  • First.AspectFirst.Aspect Posts: 4,325
    bungle73 wrote:
    Is there any sign of cracking on the sidewall? Excessive flexing from a deflated tyre, especially when wet and exposed to sunlight can damage the internal structure.

    I haven't left them deflated.

    Thats no the problem, its rolling the bike along, loaded or unloaded, while they are deflated (after a puncture) that will damage the side walls.
    mountain bikers stopped using side walls ages ago for just this reason. Eventually it will transfer to the road.
  • chippykchippyk Posts: 529
    bungle73 wrote:
    Is there any sign of cracking on the sidewall? Excessive flexing from a deflated tyre, especially when wet and exposed to sunlight can damage the internal structure.

    I haven't left them deflated.
    That means they've been exposed to oxygen in the air over a long period. This will oxidize the rubber and they will perish from the inside out. You need to use CO2, like all the pros. Team Ineos (Sky) use xenon but that's really expensive and adds to global warming.

    Do tell me.
    How does Xe contribute to global warming?
    If you were free to use any gas to fill your tyres, why would you use xenon?
  • ddraverddraver Posts: 20,379
    Shimano Xenon is rubbish. Campag Xenon is what you want! It just wears in not wears out you know...
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • First.AspectFirst.Aspect Posts: 4,325
    chippyk wrote:
    bungle73 wrote:
    Is there any sign of cracking on the sidewall? Excessive flexing from a deflated tyre, especially when wet and exposed to sunlight can damage the internal structure.

    I haven't left them deflated.
    That means they've been exposed to oxygen in the air over a long period. This will oxidize the rubber and they will perish from the inside out. You need to use CO2, like all the pros. Team Ineos (Sky) use xenon but that's really expensive and adds to global warming.

    Do tell me.
    How does Xe contribute to global warming?
    If you were free to use any gas to fill your tyres, why would you use xenon?
    personally I'd use helium, because this helps in the mountains.
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